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View Full Version : Which Leupold Mk4 Scope For Remington 700 chambered in .308


KMosley
06-19-2012, 4:02 PM
Im sure this has question has been asked numerous times already, but I am completely new to bolt action rifles and don't understand much of the previous threads I've found in a search.

With that being said, I recently purchased the Remington 700 SPS AAC-SD chambered in .308. The rifle features a 20" barrel with a 1 in 10" twist for the use of a heavier grain bullet. I intend on learning with this rifle and would like to accurately and precisely shoot from 100 yards all the way out to 1000 yards.

I have decided on a Leupold Mark 4 Scope, but with so many variants I'm really unsure of what would be best for my intended uses. Can anyone shed some insight on which model I should purchase?

AAShooter
06-19-2012, 4:19 PM
What factors bring you to decide on a Leupold Mark 4 Scope? The reason I ask is that I started pretty much in the same situation and folks more knowledgeable than I suggested there are better scopes for the money. The SWSA and Nightforce scopes can highly recommended. I ended up with one of these: http://swfa.com/SWFA-SS-5-20x50-Tactical-30mm-Riflescope-P51642.aspx at a much discounted price.

http://swfa.com/images/sshd520x50mqi.jpg

tacticalcity
06-19-2012, 4:20 PM
Lots of things to consider here.

DISTANCE & MAGNIFICATION

The all the way out to 1000 yards part suggests you want as much magnification as possible. Which can get expensive. Frankly, you're probably BSing yourself there. Few ranges offer that kind of distance, and not many shooters are that good. It is great to get there, but your rifle is not that rifle, you are probably not that shooter, so you probably don't need that massively expensive scope. So for the sake of the budget, perhaps you should be more realistic for now, and get a scope that meets todays needs and worry about tomorrow when it comes.

If in reality your shots will be 100-200 yards max, and the occassional farther shot then you probably want a 10x scope, which will be expensive but not outragiously so for the Mark 4 Series. If you really will be shooting at the outer edge of that, or further then you need to pony up for more magnification.

Here is how a 10x scope will be written.

3.5x10-40 or 3.5x10-50 for example.

If you can afford more power, and want more power...that's cool too. A really good shooter won't need it, but a lot of us do.

ILLUMINATION OR NO ILLUMINATION

IR means the retical lights up. This is more expensive. It helps when it is low light or the target you are aiming at is a dark color that blends in with your reticle, or shaddows are playing games on you. It is a nice thing to have if you can afford it. There will be times you wish you had it. But you can get by without it if you need to.

So for example the description would read Leupold Mark 4 3.5x10-40 IR

TYPE OF TURRENT

The M# or M1, M2, M3 refers to the type of turret. M1 is an older style and might cost less. I believe the amount of movement per click is different with each as well, but do not remember how that breaks down. But you can learn how to use any of the three.

TYPE OF RETICLE

You want Mil-Dot or TMR. The two easiest to learn to use offered by Leupold. Pay close attention to that when ordering. Standard cross hairs will be difficult to use at various distances. You want to be able to use your reticle to correct for distance, wind, etc. Mil-Dot and TMR gives you that once you learn how to use them.

That's what little I know about the Leupold Mark 4 Series, aside from the fact that I like them alot and have used them over the years and always been pleased with them.

slick_711
06-19-2012, 4:30 PM
I'm at work so I'll leave the suggestions and detailed explanations to someone else, but I wanted to chime in with one thought.

Whatever model scope you get, make sure you pony up for a 30mm main tube. Increased light transference, increased field of view, (usually) increased range of adjustment with the reticle. It's worth the price difference.

tacticalcity
06-19-2012, 4:31 PM
I'm at work so I'll leave the suggestions and detailed explanations to someone else, but I wanted to chime in with one thought.

Whatever model scope you get, make sure you pony up for a 30mm main tube. Increased light transference, increased field of view, (usually) increased range of adjustment with the reticle. It's worth the price difference.

Agreed. The Mark 4 Series all have 30mm tubes. It is the Mark 2 and Mark AR series that have 1" tubes if I remember correctly. Of course, if he gets something other than a Mark 4, he will need to pay close attention to tube size as well and look for 30mm.

KMosley
06-19-2012, 4:56 PM
Yeah I'm looking to get a Mil Dot reticle. The scope that I have been eyeing is the Leupold Mark 4 ER/T 6.5-20 x 50mm, so assuming that since it has a wide range of magnification that it would be a good candidate for my intended uses, correct me if I'm wrong. As TacticalCity mentioned the turret is a factor that I am unfamiliar with. I have noticed the options as M1, M3, and M5?

KMosley
06-19-2012, 4:59 PM
Also, thanks everyone for your time and responses. Im really new to all of the factors that go into a rifle scope. Any advice is appreciated.

CSACANNONEER
06-19-2012, 5:05 PM
The Mark4 is a fine choice and 6.5-20 is the minimum I'd recomend for 1000 yard shooting. That said, I have no use for Mil Dot reticles. The dots are way too big for my liking and, I prefer moa adjustments so, I also prefer a retical that better matches my adjustments.

I happen to use NF NXS scopes for 1000 yard shooting but, there's nothing wrong with a Mark 4 or even a NF BR model. In fact, the next 1000 yard scope I buy new will be a NF BR scope.

2000Yards
06-19-2012, 5:29 PM
Im sure this has question has been asked numerous times already, but I am completely new to bolt action rifles and don't understand much of the previous threads I've found in a search.

With that being said, I recently purchased the Remington 700 SPS AAC-SD chambered in .308. The rifle features a 20" barrel with a 1 in 10" twist for the use of a heavier grain bullet. I intend on learning with this rifle and would like to accurately and precisely shoot from 100 yards all the way out to 1000 yards.

I have decided on a Leupold Mark 4 Scope, but with so many variants I'm really unsure of what would be best for my intended uses. Can anyone shed some insight on which model I should purchase?

I did what you are planning on doing. I have a Mark 4, illuminated reticle with M2 turrets and it's fantastic (mounted on a Rem 700 tactical, in .308). The optics are excellent, but you won't really notice much difference between the Mark 4 and much less expensive scopes unless: light level is low, or you're looking beyond 400 yards. In either case the difference in optical quality really starts to show. My buddies with cheap scopes - they can barely see our far-field targets when the sun sets.

Alright, you're questions on the Mark 4:

Illuminated reticle - It's really beneficial for twilight shooting, about an hour to 1.5 hours before and after the sun rises and sets. Night shooting has a host of problems that I won't get into, but if you are going to shoot at night (for whatever reason) - an illuminated reticle can be very helpful. Doing it again I'm not sure I'd get one. I don't regret it, but I've yet to need it outside of a training environment.

M1/M2/M3 reticle - M1 is 1/4 MOA per "click." Slower to get on target then either of the others, but it offers the ultimate in precision adjustment (from Leupold) at distance. The downside is that with the M1 you need to turn it more than a full revolution to get the total elevation travel. Under stress you can easily loose mental track of where the turret is, end up a whole revolution out and miss your target. But at 1000 yards, each adjustment of the M1 turret moves the bullet about 2.5 inches, hence the precision. This would be a classic choice for a police sniper, for example, who needs to make a very precise shot.

M3 is 1 MOA per "click." Faster to get on target than either of the others and very easy to dial in elevation. The dial makes one turn and that's it, you'll never be a rev out, thinking you're dialed in. Gross adjustments, it's roughly 1 inch every hundred yards so at 1000 yards you're moving the bullet about 10 inches every click. This isn't a bullseye turret, it's not for pin-pointing the rounds, it's to get them on target, fast and minimizing user-induced error. Watching two shooters in a race, one with M1 and the other with as M3 type turret, the M3 shooter will finish a course of fire hands down faster than the M1 shooter. In this caliber (.308), this is the classic choice for a military sniper, for whom speed and a fool-proof design trump pin-point precision at the ranges in question.

M2 is a compromise between the two, with the drawback of needing more than one rev to get the full elevation travel of the scope. It's what I choose, it's reasonable and keeps me on target to 1100 yards or more.

I recommend the TMR reticle - very useful for ranging.

Let me know if you have other questions, happy to help.

2KYDS

(*side note: if you plan on becoming a proficient, long range shooter and your equipment is capable, then you can absolutely do it. anyone telling you otherwise means well and is on-point with respect to the average shooter, but that need not be you. I went from a novice to being very capable at long distance shooting, and I love it.*)

KMosley
06-19-2012, 5:46 PM
I did what you are planning on doing. I have a Mark 4, illuminated reticle with M2 turrets and it's fantastic (mounted on a Rem 700 tactical, in .308). The optics are excellent, but you won't really notice much difference between the Mark 4 and much less expensive scopes unless: light level is low, or you're looking beyond 400 yards. In either case the difference in optical quality really starts to show. My buddies with cheap scopes - they can barely see our far-field targets when the sun sets.

Alright, you're questions on the Mark 4:

Illuminated reticle - It's really beneficial for twilight shooting, about an hour to 1.5 hours before and after the sun rises and sets. Night shooting has a host of problems that I won't get into, but if you are going to shoot at night (for whatever reason) - an illuminated reticle can be very helpful. Doing it again I'm not sure I'd get one. I don't regret it, but I've yet to need it outside of a training environment.

M1/M2/M3 reticle - M1 is 1/4 MOA per "click." Slower to get on target then either of the others, but it offers the ultimate in precision adjustment (from Leupold) at distance. The downside is that with the M1 you need to turn it more than a full revolution to get the total elevation travel. Under stress you can easily loose mental track of where the turret is, end up a whole revolution out and miss your target. But at 1000 yards, each adjustment of the M1 turret moves the bullet about 2.5 inches, hence the precision. This would be a classic choice for a police sniper, for example, who needs to make a very precise shot.

M3 is 1 MOA per "click." Faster to get on target than either of the others and very easy to dial in elevation. The dial makes one turn and that's it, you'll never be a rev out, thinking you're dialed in. Gross adjustments, it's roughly 1 inch every hundred yards so at 1000 yards you're moving the bullet about 10 inches every click. This isn't a bullseye turret, it's not for pin-pointing the rounds, it's to get them on target, fast and minimizing user-induced error. Watching two shooters in a race, one with M1 and the other with as M3 type turret, the M3 shooter will finish a course of fire hands down faster than the M1 shooter. In this caliber (.308), this is the classic choice for a military sniper, for whom speed and a fool-proof design trump pin-point precision at the ranges in question.

M2 is a compromise between the two, with the drawback of needing more than one rev to get the full elevation travel of the scope. It's what I choose, it's reasonable and keeps me on target to 1100 yards or more.

I recommend the TMR reticle - very useful for ranging.

Let me know if you have other questions, happy to help.

2KYDS

(*side note: if you plan on becoming a proficient, long range shooter and your equipment is capable, then you can absolutely do it. anyone telling you otherwise means well and is on-point with respect to the average shooter, but that need not be you. I went from a novice to being very capable at long distance shooting, and I love it.*)


Thank you, your information and explanation has been very helpful. Now is there any advantages or disadvantages between MOA or MILS?

KMosley
06-19-2012, 5:47 PM
As I progress would there be any advantages or disadvantages between the two systems? Mil/Mil or Moa/Moa

AeroEngi
06-19-2012, 7:12 PM
Obviously MOA is easier to understand at this novice stage, but I am fairly familiar with the metric system. As I progress would there be any advantages or disadvantages between the two systems?

It's not a matter of the british system or the metric system. MOA and mils are both measurements of angle. 1 MOA is one-sixtieth of a degree and 1 mil is one-thousandth of a radian (milliradian).

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

Omega13device
06-19-2012, 7:32 PM
Mils are not metric. The measurement of a mil simply equals 1/1000th of the distance you're shooting at. If you're shooting 100 yards that's 3600 inches so 1 mil is 3.6 inches. If you're shooting at 100m that's 10,000 centimeters so 1 mil is 10 cm. At 1000 yards, 1 mil is 1 yard, and so on. (ETA: AeroEngi beat me to it.)

Whatever scope you get, make sure it uses the same system in both the turrets and the reticle, i.e., mil/mil or MOA/MOA. Here's why. You shoot a group that's left of your point of aim, and measuring the error with your mil reticle you can see that you're off by 3.25 mils. With a mil/mil scope you just dial in 3.2 or 3.3 mils.

Let's say you're using a scope with a mil reticle and MOA turrets. Now adjust your turrets for the same shot. Well 1 mil is 3.4 MOA, so 3 mils is 3 * 3.4 = 10.2, and .25 mils is, hmm, let me get out my calculator...ok .25 * 3.4 = .85 MOA, so you need to adjust by 11 MOA.

This doesn't mean mil/MOA scopes are unusable. Plenty of them are out there getting lots of use today. But if you're starting fresh why bother? This is why it makes a lot of sense to look at the SWFA SS scopes. They offer matching turrets and good glass at a competitive price.

jeddandbreakfast
06-19-2012, 7:37 PM
I'm in the market for a Rem 700. I'm such a noob but I wanted to ask this question. You said you were buying a "SD" version of that TAC 700, I was under the impression this would be illegal. This is my first gun, so forgive my ignorance. Are those actually legal in CA even though they are "SD" model?

JamminJ
06-19-2012, 7:43 PM
Great thread, thanks to all for the educational posts!

AAShooter
06-19-2012, 8:47 PM
Great thread, thanks to all for the educational posts!

I agree . . . I appreciate the discussion/education.

KMosley
06-19-2012, 9:09 PM
AAC-SD is available in CA

ExtremeX
06-19-2012, 9:40 PM
What factors bring you to decide on a Leupold Mark 4 Scope? The reason I ask is that I started pretty much in the same situation and folks more knowledgeable than I suggested there are better scopes for the money. The SWSA and Nightforce scopes can highly recommended. I ended up with one of these: http://swfa.com/SWFA-SS-5-20x50-Tactical-30mm-Riflescope-P51642.aspx at a much discounted price.

http://swfa.com/images/sshd520x50mqi.jpg

I got myself the SWFA SS 5-20 FFP as well. Killer deal

AAShooter
06-19-2012, 10:09 PM
This is a pretty good deal. It is not a Leupold but thought I should post it:

http://swfa.com/SWFA-SS-HD-1-6x24-5-20x50-Tactical-Rifle-Scopes-P56681.aspx

They have a Facebook likes promotion happening for the next couple days with a discount code of 10000 for 10,000 Facebook likes. With the discount code, the subtotal is $1,586.93. I do not know what they do about shipping. I thought I would mention it.

2000Yards
06-20-2012, 1:10 AM
Thanks to everyone that has contributed to this thread, glad to see others appreciate the information as much as I do. I have decided to go mil/mil with the Leupold Mark 4 ER/T 6.5-20x50mm M5 with the TMR reticle.

Also to Jeddandbreakfast - The Remington 700 SPS AAC-SD version is legal in california, I purchased mine at a local Turner's Outdoorsman. Its a gun to start with in my opinion due to the barrel being ready for a muzzle break.

As another poster pointed out, it's easier to have the reticle and turret in either mil or MOA, but a combination works and you get used to it (mine is mixed - turrets are MOA while reticle is mil).

In case anyone is wondering, FFP is an acronym for front focal plane, which means the reticle increases in size as you increase magnification in a zoom scope. This allows the shooter to range at any magnification. In contrast, non-FFP scopes (most) have to be on their highest mag. level in order to range correctly. I can't see why you'd range at anything less than full magnification, but one can forget to fully zoom when ranging, and you'd be off on your range estimation. Some people complain that the reticle gets too "thick" when fully zoomed - I haven't seen that as a problem in the FFP scopes that I've used.

Some other notes - it's nice not to have too much magnification. My Mark 4 is 3.5-10 and I use 3.5 for target acquisition, around 6 power for observation and 10 for shooting. The more magnification you have, the more problems you will have with mirage, low light and your own moving of the gun (heart beat, breathing, shifting, etc.). Personally I think a max magnification in the 10-15 range is ideal for around 1000 to 1200 yards. Beyond 1200 I'd take higher magnification with its downsides.

Finally, and to expand on the lower magnification, if you will ever shoot at night, keep this in mind. The ratio between your magnification level and objective lens should not be less than seven. My Mark 4 has a 40mm objective lens, so the formula is 40/7 = just under 6, around 5.8 or so. That's the highest level of magnification that I'd use at night. To put it in terms of a ratio, if I put the magnification on 10x, the ratio is (objective lens diameter in mm divided by the power rating of the scope at a particular setting) 40/10, which is 4 - not ideal because it's less than 7. So for my scope with it's 40mm objective lens, the ideal magnification level at night is about 5.8. This optimizes the light-gathering ability of the scope to eye pupil diameter when fully dilated (which is about 7mm for a healthy young adult when adjusted for darkness - as we age it will decrease to 4-5mm). You can certainly crank the mag. up, but you're loosing light and therefore detail, not worth it in my experience. So for a Mark 4 with a 50mm objective lens, the most magnification you would use at night would be 7 - 50mm/7 is about 7.1.

2KYDS

KMosley
06-20-2012, 7:56 AM
My friend is using a mixed scope as well, mil dot reticle with 1/4 moa turrets. I figure ill just learn with the mil/mil set up. As for the magnification, I understand what you are saying. Would you recommend a lower power scope or do you think its fine to have the wide range of adjustability? They do have a 4.5-14x50mm model of the ER/T.

Hoop
06-20-2012, 8:09 AM
Why are you dead set on Leupold? Are you LE or Mil? If so you can get a discount...grab one of these rather than the Mk4:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CY_XYt73ToY

If you want to keep it under a 1k bucks find a deal on a vortex PST FFP or Bushnell 3-12 with G2DMR reticule.

Pryde
06-20-2012, 8:39 AM
2 things to consider regarding your questions:

1: As previously mentioned, get matching turrets/reticle. In your case make sure you get M5 knobs, they are the newest version released in 2010 with .1 mil adjustments. All the others are MOA adjustments. Leupold does not make MOA reticles so moa/moa is not an option.

2: Do not get the 6.5-20!!! I had one before and they all have an inherent design flaw of shifting eye relief. This means that as you adjust magnification, your eye relief changes forcing you to move your head back and forth in about a 3 inch range in your stock to get a proper sight picture.
The 3.5-10 and 4-14 do not have this problem.

2000Yards
06-20-2012, 10:36 AM
2 things to consider regarding your questions:

1: As previously mentioned, get matching turrets/reticle. In your case make sure you get M5 knobs, they are the newest version released in 2010 with .1 mil adjustments. All the others are MOA adjustments. Leupold does not make MOA reticles so moa/moa is not an option.

2: Do not get the 6.5-20!!! I had one before and they all have an inherent design flaw of shifting eye relief. This means that as you adjust magnification, your eye relief changes forcing you to move your head back and forth in about a 3 inch range in your stock to get a proper sight picture.
The 3.5-10 and 4-14 do not have this problem.

Sheesh, I wish Lp had mil/mil scopes when I bought mine. It would have graduated the learning curve. That would be the way to go.

Pryde - wow, that sounds really bad. Is there any overlap between the relief zones? You will loose some eye relief in most scopes, comparing the highest mag level to the lowest, but to have it shift that much makes a single shooting position sound unachievable. My 3.5-10 has less relief at 10x than at 3.5x, but it's entirely within the zone of relief at 3.5x.

As to how much magnification - just be aware there are tradeoffs. If you're thinking of taking prairie dogs or squirrels at 600 yards, you'll want a lot of magnification just to identify them. If you want to find IPSC-size targets from 200 to 1000 yards and consistently hit them, a 3.5-10 zoom has worked great for me.

Oner more thing to keep in mind - in the zoom world of cameras, high-end zoom lenses will rarely (I actually don't know of any that break this guideline) if ever have more than a multiple of 3 between lowest and highest magnification. Meaning, if your lowest mag level is 5 then your highest is 15 (5x3=15; look at all of Canon and Nikon's high-end lenses, their zoom multiple is 3 or less). Zoom optics are compromises, so clarity, brightness, color rendition, etc. start to suffer as soon as you have a zoom lens. Most of the camera manufacturers have found that you get too many compromises in cost/quality when zooming more than a 3 multiple, for high-end optics, so they stick with 3 or less. There are tons of zoom lenses that have wider range than that - I'm talking only about HIGH END OPTICS - expensive camera zoom lenses. The physics and cost/quality balance apply equally to rifle scopes which is one reason that some scope manufacturers limit the mag range of their high end scopes to 3 (I think the entire Mark 4 line is a 3 multiple, for example). I'm not saying it's never done - Zeiss makes zoom lenses with a multiple of 4, and most people who own Zeiss and Mark 4s agree that Zeiss has better optics (not necessarily better scopes, but better optics) - the hitch is that comparable Zeiss scopes start at $2000 and you can easily pay 4 grand if you want one of their top-of-the-line scopes.

2KYDS

2000Yards
06-20-2012, 10:50 AM
My friend is using a mixed scope as well, mil dot reticle with 1/4 moa turrets. I figure ill just learn with the mil/mil set up. As for the magnification, I understand what you are saying. Would you recommend a lower power scope or do you think its fine to have the wide range of adjustability? They do have a 4.5-14x50mm model of the ER/T.

For shooting to 1K yards I think both the 3.5-10 and the 4.5-14 are fine. Higher than that for your top end is needed for either ID'ing small things at distance or getting much beyond 1000 yards (say 1200 or more). If you were building a .300 WM you'd want the 14 mag top end; for a .338 LM a 16-20 mag top end, and 20x or more for really long shots (over 1 mile) in a .40 cal or larger rifle.

2KYDS

Divernhunter
06-20-2012, 12:44 PM
My Nightforce NXS 5.5X22X56 NPR-2 scopes works just fine on both of my 50bmg rifles. They are high end scopes for sure and they also break your 3X mag rule of thumb. I have shot mine at over 1400 yards ranges with a good quality lazer rangefinder. Last time out I shot well over that and no trouble with the scope.
One other thing to consider is that you will want alot of vertical adjustment in the scope even with an angled base. Both the Leupold MKIV and the Nightfore have 100+ units of elvation. My Nightfore has 140 and I believe the Leupold has 100. Some of your other brands have 30- 80 only and that is not good.

2000Yards
06-20-2012, 1:26 PM
My Nightforce NXS 5.5X22X56 NPR-2 scopes works just fine on both of my 50bmg rifles. They are high end scopes for sure and they also break your 3X mag rule of thumb. I have shot mine at over 1400 yards ranges with a good quality lazer rangefinder. Last time out I shot well over that and no trouble with the scope.
One other thing to consider is that you will want alot of vertical adjustment in the scope even with an angled base. Both the Leupold MKIV and the Nightfore have 100+ units of elvation. My Nightfore has 140 and I believe the Leupold has 100. Some of your other brands have 30- 80 only and that is not good.

Great point. It isn't an issue with the Mark4s, but some scopes marketed as "long range" have an alarming lack of elevation travel.

X-NewYawker
06-20-2012, 2:15 PM
Yeah I'm looking to get a Mil Dot reticle. The scope that I have been eyeing is the Leupold Mark 4 ER/T 6.5-20 x 50mm, so assuming that since it has a wide range of magnification that it would be a good candidate for my intended uses, correct me if I'm wrong. As TacticalCity mentioned the turret is a factor that I am unfamiliar with. I have noticed the options as M1, M3, and M5?

I used to put the Mark IV 6.5-20x on my bolt guns until I discovered the 4.5-14x gave me less mirage visibility. The 30mm tube ER/T 6-20 is a great scope. I would go with it over a Nightforce on price/quality alone

Cypriss32
06-20-2012, 5:01 PM
I used to put the Mark IV 6.5-20x on my bolt guns until I discovered the 4.5-14x gave me less mirage visibility. The 30mm tube ER/T 6-20 is a great scope. I would go with it over a Nightforce on price/quality alone

NOt me, Every leupold I have had EXCEPT the 3.5-10x VX3 Tactical with M3 knobs have NOT held zero period. My nightforce and vortex scopes are the best yet. I am also VERY happy with the NEW bushnell and weaver tactical. Leupold HAS stepped up this year with the Mark 6 and 8 scopes....... They seem to be AWESOME. But the new HDMR 3.5-21x is about the best deal going.

KMosley
06-21-2012, 9:38 AM
Also when installing a scope mount do you recommend it being bedded? I installed mine without bedding and it seems to be sitting pretty flush, but I'm not one hundred percent sure that it is. I look at the edges at some angles and I can see a slight bit of light peering through. If bedding is needed Id like to have it done by a professional. Can anyone refer me to a competent gun smith that works on precision rifle's?

jpscoot_21
06-21-2012, 9:53 PM
The scope mount/rings are a weak link on a precision rifle, so make sure you get good quality rings, and perhaps a base with a downward cant for dialing in longer shots. Btw, the base won't be bedded, and hopefully the base holes are inline and centered. (The rings might get lapped but a good set probably wont need it) and rubber cemented to avoid marking the scope. Been doing lots of reading on this while I'm building a M700. Thanks to everyone for contributing to this thread.

KMosley
06-22-2012, 5:14 AM
Right on, I mounted my base up and am now in search of some rings. Cant decide between the Badger Ordnance, Nightforce, or Larue. Eager to get my rifle out and break her in.

Wernher von Browning
06-22-2012, 6:31 AM
Also when installing a scope mount do you recommend it being bedded? I installed mine without bedding and it seems to be sitting pretty flush, but I'm not one hundred percent sure that it is. I look at the edges at some angles and I can see a slight bit of light peering through. If bedding is needed Id like to have it done by a professional. Can anyone refer me to a competent gun smith that works on precision rifle's?


If you can see light, it's way too loose. The rings are not conforming to the tube. With this, which is considered a high-power caliber, bedding is just about a must. Sure, some get away without it -- but besides the thing moving around on you, you risk permanently deforming or even damaging your very expensive scope's tube and tweaking the internal bits.

Once I built up a milsurp with a scope, thought I could get away without bedding it. Nope. It was moving from shot to shot.

I'd offer to let you borrow my bedding tools (some fine valve grinding compound and a piece of 1" ground steel shafting) but you have 30mm and I don't have a bar for that.

KMosley
06-27-2012, 7:18 AM
Now that I have done more research on the magnification, I'm curious, what is everyone's take on the 4.5-14 mag variant and do any of you have first hand experience with both the 14 and 20? Would it suit my needs of a scope for 1000 yards +? The idea of it being less effected by mirage and the even cheaper cost would definitely benefit me.

Hoop
06-27-2012, 8:07 AM
Also when installing a scope mount do you recommend it being bedded? I installed mine without bedding and it seems to be sitting pretty flush, but I'm not one hundred percent sure that it is. I look at the edges at some angles and I can see a slight bit of light peering through. If bedding is needed Id like to have it done by a professional. Can anyone refer me to a competent gun smith that works on precision rifle's?

People bed or shim them because sometimes the action isn't 100% in spec. Like, the back will be a bit too high or something. Some old timers would bed them with epoxy but I wouldn't go that far.

Without looking at it I am going to bet that you are fine.

BTW I would have already bought a super sniper 5-20, bushnell HDMR or IOR 4-16 FFP by now.