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View Full Version : LockTite & Staking on AR15 Castle Nut


Fractured
06-04-2012, 7:12 PM
So I've read that some people put locktite on their buffer tube castle nut, some people stake it and some people just give it an "umph".

I'm at the point in my build where I need to do one of those things.

What do YOU do calgunners, and why?

tomd1584
06-04-2012, 7:14 PM
Tighten and stake. Don't put loctite on it.

Plisk
06-04-2012, 7:16 PM
Tighten and stake. Don't put loctite on it.

+1

Loctite on the buffer tube just causes problems.

WDE91
06-04-2012, 8:14 PM
What about something like green loctite??

Plisk
06-04-2012, 8:22 PM
Loctite is just asking for trouble. Staking is the best way to go.

NSR500
06-04-2012, 8:26 PM
Torque and Stake.

tanakasan
06-04-2012, 8:28 PM
I gave mine an extra firm tightening...green (cylindrical bond?!) would be a bear to remove although it would come off with heat.

Robert

Dhena81
06-04-2012, 10:25 PM
Stake it.

You can still remove it and it needs to be done unless you barely shoot.

Grumpyoldretiredcop
06-05-2012, 1:17 AM
Stake it since that's what it's designed for.

mdib870
06-05-2012, 4:01 AM
throw a spot weld on with an arc welder :jump:

mdib870
06-05-2012, 4:04 AM
actually staking wasnt in eugene stoners original design

ohnozombeez
06-05-2012, 5:11 AM
Tighten and torque

gunnerstuff
06-05-2012, 5:21 AM
What mdib870 and ohnozombeez said. The correct torque is what resists any forces that would allow the fastner to come loose. If the castle nut is coming loose, then it sounds like you may have some other problem as in out of spec threads on the nut or buffer tube. You don't locktite or stake your lug nuts on your car tires, do you?

FX-05 Xiuhcoatl
06-05-2012, 5:24 AM
I have it LockTite on mine, "only 2 drops" 2 years later and 3000rds and no problem.

dbo31
06-05-2012, 5:59 AM
One of my AR's came with loctite on the castle nut...giannnnt pain in the ***** when putting on a single point sling attachment..don't do it.

Fractured
06-05-2012, 6:45 AM
What do you guys torque it to? 40in lbs?

jchen76@gmail.com
06-05-2012, 7:42 AM
I've used blue loctite on my buffer tube with no issues. I used it sparingly, and have taken it off to install a sling loop plate. I used a hair dryer for 3 minutes on the buffer tube to loosen the loctite, scraped off the old loctite with a pick. It's been 3 years since I've used loctite with no issues.

tonyxcom
06-05-2012, 7:52 AM
You don't locktite or stake your lug nuts on your car tires, do you?

No, but they also don't have a wrench attached to them all the time.

The castle nut isn't necessarily what comes loose. Its the receiver extension that does. Your stock acts as a wrench on the RE and if even if you have sufficient torque on the castle nut, the RE can eventually start to back out in the lower which then loosens the castle nut.

Just stake it. The stakes are just as easy to pound out than pound in.

All you need is a hammer and $10 center punch. I do mine on the computer desk in my home office :)

When you use loctite on your castle nut and you find yourself needing to change your receiver extension; when you try to loosen the castle nut you are likely to just spin the RE in the lower and gouge it across the notch in the end plate which will then damage your lower receiver threads.

IPSICK
06-05-2012, 8:20 AM
No loctite or staking, just torque for me. Tried loctite once and I won't do it again. I had to replace my receiver extension, castle nut, and end plate when trying to install a Magpul ASAP plate. I just check my castle nut and receiver extension periodically instead of staking.

gunnerstuff
06-05-2012, 8:31 AM
Tonyxcom, I can see your point. Guess good recommendation would be to start out by just torquing it and if it becomes an issue then apply a stake. Kinda like my 1919, it just rattles itself apart if not just about everything is staked/double staked.

tonyxcom
06-05-2012, 9:09 AM
Tonyxcom, I can see your point. Guess good recommendation would be to start out by just torquing it and if it becomes an issue then apply a stake. Kinda like my 1919, it just rattles itself apart if not just about everything is staked/double staked.

This is sound. I doubt any of us are talking about a duty or fighting weapon so if it came loose at the range it wouldn't be the end of the world.

If you are taking any kind of carbine class though, make sure that its staked. The last thing you want to do is hold up the class.

HK Dave
06-05-2012, 9:12 AM
I used to just torque but I had one come loose in the middle of a drill last year and it kinda sucked when the stock turned 90 degrees. :P Stake it and then go eat a nice steak. :D

If you're really worried, just red loctite and spot weld. ;)

p1choco
06-05-2012, 9:35 AM
Nothing wrong with using loctite if you're still thinking about changing/upgrading your endplate later on. Loctite with a little heat is a non-issue when it comes time to disassembly. It's just like any tool, you have to learn how to use it. And if you're using your AR as a range plinker and not wringing it out on some tac course, it's not going to be a big issue. But once your setup and finalized staking it will provide piece of mind and is the preferred method used by the military for a reason.

tonyxcom
06-05-2012, 9:50 AM
Nothing wrong with using loctite if you're still thinking about changing/upgrading your endplate later on. Loctite with a little heat is a non-issue when it comes time to disassembly. It's just like any tool, you have to learn how to use it. And if you're using your AR as a range plinker and not wringing it out on some tac course, it's not going to be a big issue. But once your setup and finalized staking it will provide piece of mind and is the preferred method used by the military for a reason.

Locktite still isn't the answer unless you are putting it on the RE threads that go in the lower. Putting locktite on the castle nut is USELESS. All you are doing is preventing the nut from spinning on the RE. The RE can still spin in the lower.

That is why you stake. The end plate cannot spin on the lower. When you stake the castle nut to the end plate you now cannot spin the castle nut or the RE.

p1choco
06-05-2012, 11:44 AM
Locktite still isn't the answer unless you are putting it on the RE threads that go in the lower. Putting locktite on the castle nut is USELESS. All you are doing is preventing the nut from spinning on the RE. The RE can still spin in the lower.

That is why you stake. The end plate cannot spin on the lower. When you stake the castle nut to the end plate you now cannot spin the castle nut or the RE.

I understand the whole staking bit. You may be reading too much into my post. I didn't mention where to place the loctite. Agreed that it should be used on the RE/BT and the castle nut. The castle nut does however place lateral pressure on the RE help to prevent it from moving like the lug nut reference above and the BARREL. If the castle nut isn't torqued properly, you may still be able wiggle the RE as much at the indentation in the endplate will let it move. Without staking you'll be ok as mentioned above if it's torqued properly.

I suggested that if he would be upgrading the endplate, using loctite will be fine. And if not, stake it. I'm not against staking (I prefer that), but unless he's going to be rocking and rolling through some courses and putting thousands of rounds down range, it's not going to fall apart.

FYI, to all concerned, check to make sure that your barrel hasn't loosened up after a few hundred rounds or when ever you'd like. If you start noticing some accuracy issues, check this. If you have a A2 type front sight post, grab a hold of that and try and twist that using your other hand to hold on to the receiver. If you can wiggle the barrel, the barrel nut needs to be re-torqued. No staking needed there. If you donít have a front sight post, you'll have to figure out some other way to check for barrel looseness. This is common practice when inspecting rifles before firing in the military. And something I have found on a few home builds at the range.

LAL6
06-05-2012, 11:49 AM
I haven't locktited or staked, but I did have one wiggle loose on me so I'd say staking is a good idea.