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View Full Version : Here is some fascinating information: CA top political donors, 2001-2011


DVSmith
06-04-2012, 6:42 AM
http://rainmaker.apps.cironline.org/

Vacaville
06-04-2012, 6:50 AM
Interesting site. Thanks! You can spend hours looking at this stuff.

Maestro Pistolero
06-04-2012, 6:52 AM
95 percent men. Interesting.

Clownpuncher
06-04-2012, 7:04 AM
Interesting.

I think the most facinating information is under the groups tab. When a public employee union is the #1 donor (by more than 1.5 times the #2 donor) you know you have problems. Talk about the tail wagging the dog.

Actually, 10 of the top 50 group donors are public employee unions. Wow.

bulgron
06-04-2012, 7:45 AM
Check out that guy Bing. $49 million to a failed proposition? Wow.

I'd never heard of him before, so I googled him. In addition to funding losing propositions, he also certainly has a problem with losing DNA tests. LOL!

DVSmith
06-04-2012, 10:50 AM
From another article:
http://californiawatch.org/money-and-politics/states-top-100-political-donors-contribute-125-billion-16436

In a state with nearly 38 million people, few have more influence than the top 100 donors to California campaigns – a powerful club that has donated overwhelmingly to Democrats and spent $1.25 billion to influence voters over the past dozen years.

These big spenders represent a tiny fraction of the hundreds of thousands of individuals and groups that donated to California campaigns from 2001 through 2011. But they supplied about a third of the $3.67 billion lavished on state campaigns during that time, campaign records show.

With a few exceptions, these campaign elites have gotten their money’s worth, according to an analysis by California Watch of data from the National Institute on Money in State Politics and state finance records.

The state’s top 100 donors gave nearly five times as much to winning candidates as they did to losers. And they helped steer initiative campaigns to success as well – about 55 percent of every dollar they contributed to propositions aided a winning campaign, the analysis shows.

Some of these top 100 donors are continuing to donate heavily in the 2012 election cycle. For their part, tobacco companies Philip Morris and R.J. Reynolds have spent more than $30 million since January to defeat an initiative on tomorrow’s ballot that would increase the cigarette tax.

“Major players with major stakes in statewide issues are going to make sure their opinions are heard,” said Jack Pitney, a political science professor at Claremont McKenna College who focuses on California issues.

Given its size and wealth, California automatically sets national records for campaign donations – more money is spent here on politics than in any other state.

Not surprisingly for California, the top 100 directed their money in large part toward the Democratic Party, which controls the governor’s office and the state Legislature. Overall, these top donors – 50 wealthy individuals and 50 special interest groups analyzed by California Watch – gave twice as much to Democratic candidates as they did members of other political parties.

But there was a split: Special interest donors favored Democrats, while individual donors favored Republicans by a slim margin.

When broken down, records show the top 50 group contributors – including labor unions, energy companies and tribal governments – were three times more likely to give to Democratic candidates. The top 50 individuals, however, gave slightly more to Republicans.

nicki
06-04-2012, 11:30 AM
This is one of the reasons we will have a hard time getting rid of incumbents, it is also a strong reason why our best bet for getting pro gun candidates starts at the local level.

If we want pro gun candidates in office, then we may have to cut deals on other issues and with other groups and individuals.

Let's be honest, most of our opponents started at the local level, as they rose up the political food chain, they made promises to donors. Keeping promises to donors ensures other donors.

If we got to the point that we could consistently deliver 100,000 dollars in campaign funds and 1000 volunteers who would commit 8 hrs to campaign work in every assembly race we target, we wouldn't have a gun control problem.

This is not impossible, but it is unlikely because the reality is why we already have the bodies out there, the vast majority of those bodies are not committed.

Thanks to the original poster for showing us the light.

Nicki

Yemff
06-04-2012, 11:53 AM
Without even looking i'm going to guess the teachers union is at the top

highpowermatch
06-04-2012, 1:08 PM
Interesting.

I think the most facinating information is under the groups tab. When a public employee union is the #1 donor (by more than 1.5 times the #2 donor) you know you have problems. Talk about the tail wagging the dog.

Actually, 10 of the top 50 group donors are public employee unions. Wow.

Union employees need to start exercising their Beck law rights!

CBruce
06-04-2012, 1:34 PM
Interesting.

I think the most facinating information is under the groups tab. When a public employee union is the #1 donor (by more than 1.5 times the #2 donor) you know you have problems. Talk about the tail wagging the dog.

Actually, 10 of the top 50 group donors are public employee unions. Wow.

How is that worse than large contributions from corporations, special interst groups, or private donations from a very wealthy individual?

jwkincal
06-04-2012, 2:02 PM
How is that worse than large contributions from corporations, special interst groups, or private donations from a very wealthy individual?

Not so much as folks might think, I imagine. However, I'd posit that the feedback cycle for a PUBLIC Employee Union is empirically shorter and as a consequence the path to corruption is correspondingly truncated.

Bolillo
06-04-2012, 3:27 PM
How is that worse than large contributions from corporations, special interst groups, or private donations from a very wealthy individual?

Because union members have no choice but to "contribute" via mandatory dues deducted from their paycheck. No dues, no job.

Corporations have stockholders to answer to for doing stupid stuff with money.

Special interest groups get their money from individuals or organization who voluntarily choose to give.

Wealthy individuals can do whatever they choose to with their own money.

hoffmang
06-04-2012, 5:37 PM
Check out that guy Bing. $49 million to a failed proposition? Wow.


And this is why most thinking gun rights folks hesitate to run an initiative proposition...

-Gene

Clownpuncher
06-04-2012, 5:45 PM
How is that worse than large contributions from corporations, special interst groups, or private donations from a very wealthy individual?

Because when the employees are determining who the boss is, especially at the expense of the rest of us, things are a bit shady.

Not to mention that many of the union members don't have a choice in continuing to pay the union.

I just have a real problem with a union, with all the collective rights that come with that status, can simply pick the candidate they want that will give them the most no matter the cost to the rest of us. If a corporation were run that way, say the UAW got to elect the CEO of Ford, based on how much better that elected individual will make their wages no matter the cost, how long do you think that company would last?

And when we, the people, realize that we got the shaft, we can't change anything because of those collective rights that corporations and special interest groups don't have.

The latest union tactic, and I believe these numbers support it and it will eventually finish this state off, is not to support ballot initiatives but to simply pour the money into district races where the candidate who will give them the most is running in order to take over a 2/3 majority with friendly candidates, the taxes are raised and the public employees get what they want.

I hope Wisconsin is a harbinger of things to come in the future for public service unions.

BigDogatPlay
06-04-2012, 5:56 PM
None of the groups named on the linked list particularly surprise me. Public employee unions have been largely running Sacramento for a couple of decades now, and it likely won't end until the state settles into full free fall insolvency.

Taken back just a few years, the largest group contributors to Governor Gray Davis in his first term, when he was already running for his second, were the California Association of Highway Patrolmen and the California Correctional Peace Officers Association. Those who can remember back that far will also recall that it was during that time that Governor Davis in relatively good economic times signed the 3% @ 50 public safety retirement option, along with a massive pay increase spread out over several years, for both unions. At the time a quite powerful Democrat state senator opined for the record that the Governor had given every state employee's raise for the next several years to CHP and the prison guards, and that the plan was not in the state's best interests.

And where are we now?

Clownpuncher
06-04-2012, 6:36 PM
None of the groups named on the linked list particularly surprise me. Public employee unions have been largely running Sacramento for a couple of decades now, and it likely won't end until the state settles into full free fall insolvency.

Taken back just a few years, the largest group contributors to Governor Gray Davis in his first term, when he was already running for his second, were the California Association of Highway Patrolmen and the California Correctional Peace Officers Association. Those who can remember back that far will also recall that it was during that time that Governor Davis in relatively good economic times signed the 3% @ 50 public safety retirement option, along with a massive pay increase spread out over several years, for both unions. At the time a quite powerful Democrat state senator opined for the record that the Governor had given every state employee's raise for the next several years to CHP and the prison guards, and that the plan was not in the state's best interests.

And where are we now?

I remember it. Unfortunately I have to agree with you. Nothing will change in this state until it goes bankrupt and breaks it's contracts.

It's sad because I really don't think that anyone, lib or conservative, thinks that public employees shouldn't have a good wage and even a retirement plan but the abuse of the collective bargaining system has obliterated that trust and makes people sound like it's an either/or proposition.
Things like pension spiking, retiring at 50 from a non physically tasking job and then taking another public job in order to double dip both salary and pension, getting paid to walk from the parking lot to your job, and all of the other perks that these unions have bought are going to ruin this state and any sentiment that the general public has for them when the system implodes.

Bolillo
06-04-2012, 7:56 PM
And where are we now?

What's worse than broke-azz?

In California, you don't go to Greece -- Greece come to you. On High-Speed Rail.

motorhead
06-05-2012, 12:32 AM
Interesting.

I think the most facinating information is under the groups tab. When a public employee union is the #1 donor (by more than 1.5 times the #2 donor) you know you have problems. Talk about the tail wagging the dog.

Actually, 10 of the top 50 group donors are public employee unions. Wow.
AND their rank and file as individuals. kinda makes you feel owned.

motorhead
06-05-2012, 12:34 AM
even if the host dies, how long a wait for the parasites to fall off?

Smokeybehr
06-05-2012, 1:19 PM
even if the host dies, how long a wait for the parasites to fall off?

As long as there's a drop of blood left, they'll keep on sucking.

Wherryj
06-06-2012, 10:11 AM
How is that worse than large contributions from corporations, special interst groups, or private donations from a very wealthy individual?

It isn't worse, but I would ask how is it better? The Democratic party is livid about the SCoTUS decision allowing contributions from corporations. They are mad because us to now only the Democrats had figured out how to have corporate donations-have a union steal the money from their members and vote "party".

motorhead
06-06-2012, 10:27 AM
most butthurt they are!