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View Full Version : Will Gloves Become Common in Handgun Shooting?


Excelsior
06-03-2012, 6:43 PM
Will the wearing of gloves become more and more common in the handgun shooting sports? I remember as a small child watching baseball players very reluctantly adopt a single golf glove. Many never did at all. After decades now most wear two gloves. Will we see this in the shooting shorts?

The reason I asked is that I have seen more and more gloves worn in certain events like 3-Gun. Gloves are also getting better and better. I was at the range and shooting in a steel challenge setting and one of the faster guys pulled on a single golf glove on his right hand (he was a right-handed shooter.) I asked if there was something wrong with this hand he said no, then smiled and said "try it."

I just tried my G17L using two very thin/tactile batting gloves and I must say the grip seems superb. Easily handle a mag replacement without any change. Any comments? Thanks.

blakdawg
06-03-2012, 7:04 PM
I often shoot with nitrile gloves because I have psoriasis and often have compromised skin on my hands and don't want lead or other combustion byproducts to get beneath the skin or into my bloodstream that way. I haven't noticed any particular performance benefit from that but maybe thicker gloves are helpful in that regard.

Is the purported benefit a "stickier" attachment to the gun's surfaces, or reduction of perceived recoil, or ..?

Bug Splat
06-03-2012, 7:08 PM
Golf gloves actually make great shooting gloves but won't last long. They are very thin which gives the shooter great tactile feel over the controls but they rip easy and don't wear well. I'm a golfer so I have worn a pair or two in my day. Gone through more than I can remember.

I wear a set of thin mechanix gloves sometimes while shooting. If you have ever gone shooting outdoors for long periods of time your guns gets SUPER hot just from sitting on a bench or in your holster from the sun. In cold rain or on bright sunny days gloves can help.

Bug Splat
06-03-2012, 7:11 PM
Is the purported benefit a "stickier" attachment to the gun's surfaces, or reduction of perceived recoil, or ..?

Yes to all. They can help with holding the gun, reducing felt recoil and keeping your nubs nice and toasty on cold days. I shoot with them at the range so my hands are use to operating a pistol with them on. It totally changes the feel of shooting. Practice for the worst.

EDIT: Also, Gloves protect your hands from cuts from glass, rocks, or other sharp objects. All it takes is a small cut on your hand to take it out of the fight.

wjc
06-03-2012, 7:13 PM
I don't wear gloves while shooting. I can't understand the reason for it. I can grip the firearm fine without them.

I *do* use a glove when playing golf but that's because I tend to rip off skin from my fingers because I grip the club to hard.

daybreak
06-03-2012, 7:18 PM
I wear gloves all day for work, but I don't wear them while shooting, and probably never will. I just like the sensory feedback of my skin on the gun I guess. That and I doubt I'll ever be wearing gloves in the event that I will have to use a gun in self defense, so I don't see the point in training with them on.

Bug Splat
06-03-2012, 7:23 PM
I wear gloves all day for work, but I don't wear them while shooting, and probably never will. I just like the sensory feedback of my skin on the gun I guess. That and I doubt I'll ever be wearing gloves in the event that I will have to use a gun in self defense, so I don't see the point in training with them on.

Thats exactly what these guys thought ;)

http://reddawndvd.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/reddawn-1.jpg

dwtt
06-03-2012, 7:25 PM
I recently got a pair of Lousville Slugger batting gloves for this purpose. The gloves add a little bit of bulk, but the feel is about the same as bare handed once you get used to the gloves. The biggest advantage is better grip on the gun, and with the way I shoot Production, I need all the help I can get. :)

Striker
06-03-2012, 7:26 PM
Personally, for pistol shooting, it depends on the gun and the weather. Some guns, at least for me don't need any enhancement in the grip area. TRP comes to mind as it's very well thought out. Control is excellent. Some guns like my Sig for instance has slick grips on it. You can stipple them if you like, but I generally use a new set of grips, grip tape or both or a grip sleeve on those guns. IMHO, they aid in control of the gun when running it at speed. But in an emergency or if you don't want to do any of those, gloves will you better control of the gun. Also, if I'm shooting outside in the winter and it's cold, I'll wear tactical gloves just to give my hands a little more warmth without losing as much dexterity as I would with winter gloves. A compromise. When I shoot ARs, i always wear gloves.

glockman19
06-03-2012, 7:28 PM
I do have a pair of finger tip less cycling golves that double as shooting gloves.

meaty-btz
06-03-2012, 7:28 PM
I find that I like gloves with sub-compacts but everything else is done bare. I use biking gloves, leather, mesh + strategic padding that makes the tiny arse grip a better size. Seriously improved my shooting of subcompact.

Everything else is bare.

Bobula
06-03-2012, 7:34 PM
Hope not

jlbflyboy172
06-03-2012, 8:02 PM
Only when hunting in the mountains in the late fall when it is friggin cold!

Not at the local range. Never will.

skyscraper
06-03-2012, 8:12 PM
Man up, nancy. Gloves are for girls and Internet badasses.

This reminds me of guys who walk into the gym with 2 gallons of water and leather gloves, even though they can't lift more than 20lbs for the life of them.

No thanks

MA2
06-03-2012, 8:24 PM
I tried my baseball gloves, it was okay.

Grip tape or stippling is the way to go, I think.

Excelsior
06-03-2012, 8:25 PM
I wear gloves all day for work, but I don't wear them while shooting, and probably never will. I just like the sensory feedback of my skin on the gun I guess. That and I doubt I'll ever be wearing gloves in the event that I will have to use a gun in self defense, so I don't see the point in training with them on.

That's not dulled much (if any) while wearing thin batting gloves. It certainly would be while wearing something like mechanics' gloves.

jlbflyboy172
06-03-2012, 8:25 PM
LOL! That's funny.

Excelsior
06-03-2012, 8:27 PM
Man up, nancy. Gloves are for girls and Internet badasses.

This reminds me of guys who walk into the gym with 2 gallons of water and leather gloves, even though they can't lift more than 20lbs for the life of them.

No thanks

Close your hole, nanette. This not about being a man -- not that you would know in the first place.

I'm not sure what 2 gallons of water and leather gloves have to do with lifting more than 20 pounds but we'll just leave that to your screwy logic. :rolleyes:

Agent Orange
06-03-2012, 8:33 PM
The pussification continues...

JTecalo
06-03-2012, 8:40 PM
I started using thin batter's gloves in cold weather and liked them so just kept using them.

The thin ones from Big 5 work good for my occasional shooting, but probably wouldn't hold up too long in every weekend shooting matches.

G60
06-03-2012, 8:54 PM
Man up, nancy. Gloves are for girls and Internet badasses.


Ironic, isn't it?

Asher L
06-03-2012, 8:57 PM
The pussification continues...

Yeah, it's bad enough that all you sissies need gunpowder to launch a projectile. Me, I spit lead...

skyscraper
06-03-2012, 9:05 PM
The pussification continues...

Sadly, it's a growing trend. It's funny when guys complain about 20 LPI

JTecalo
06-03-2012, 9:06 PM
Yeah, it's bad enough that all you sissies need gunpowder to launch a projectile. Me, I spit lead...

you must be fun when the doc says "turn your head and cough.." :)

nhattran_1528
06-03-2012, 9:20 PM
I have a pair of fingerless mechanics gloves in my BOB. One day i might have to shoot my way through a bunch of zombies and reppel down a line to safety

Packy14
06-03-2012, 9:43 PM
Man up, nancy. Gloves are for girls and Internet badasses.

This reminds me of guys who walk into the gym with 2 gallons of water and leather gloves, even though they can't lift more than 20lbs for the life of them.

No thanks

haha...and which of the above are you? (fyi I don't wear gloves, but I can understand the appeal, especially when running drills w/ AR's)

Ubermcoupe
06-03-2012, 10:09 PM
Only time I find them useful is when its cold outside, keep my hands warm and such. :thumbsup:

Excelsior
06-03-2012, 10:45 PM
The pussification continues...

Been looking in a mirror?

Excelsior
06-03-2012, 10:47 PM
Sadly, it's a growing trend. It's funny when guys complain about 20 LPI

Stop whining, nanette.

stix213
06-04-2012, 6:50 AM
Ive cut my fingers a couple times while out shooting, so sometimes I wear gloves. Not wearing them for grip or any other reason.

hossb7
06-04-2012, 6:57 AM
The bigger question is: who cares?

I'm sure 90% of the people on this website preach "Don't tread on me", so take a page from your own book and stop worrying about what other people do.

nocomply25
06-04-2012, 8:17 AM
I think it depends on the situation. I do not see the advantage of going shooting when its really cold and not wearing a glove. your fingers do not even work well like that. Either way to each his own.

Paradiddle
06-04-2012, 8:31 AM
I hope not as well.

I see no need to wear them. Perhaps if I were repelling from a helicopter or in combat I would change my tune (although no one wore them in WWI, WWII, Korea, or Vietnam).

Mongoblack23
06-04-2012, 8:44 AM
i often wear a pair of under-armor batting gloves when i am shooting for extended periods, it saves the webbing between my thumb and finger, its more comfortable when the gun has been sitting in the sun for the last hour while i was shooting something else, and since i am often outdoors and in the hills, they protect my hands from other sharp bits. now, when im ging for longer range precision, i take them off to get a better feel of my trigger. and when i am doing self defense drills with soon to be defensive carry pistols, i dont wear them since i wont be wearing them if the situation should present its self. but shooting paper, bowling pins, clays and other such targets, i wear them. id rather save my hands and be able to shoot a few hundred more rounds, then "feel like a man and never wear gloves." im curious to those that think wearing gloves is a "pussification" do you shoot without eyes and ears too?

dfletcher
06-04-2012, 8:57 AM
I'd guess that until manufacturers figure out whether shooting gloves are for comfort or better grip they won't be all that popular. I bought a pair for shooting my Encore pistol in the heavier calibers - 375 H & H, 405 Win, 416, 45/70 and such. Never got to like them because they were hot in the summer and prevented a good feel of the gun and trigger. After a few times shooting without them I just got used to a little more recoil.

Excelsior
06-04-2012, 9:06 AM
The bigger question is: who cares?

I'm sure 90% of the people on this website preach "Don't tread on me", so take a page from your own book and stop worrying about what other people do.

Obviously you cared enough to open your yap... :rolleyes:

Excelsior
06-04-2012, 9:07 AM
I hope not as well.

I see no need to wear them. Perhaps if I were repelling from a helicopter or in combat I would change my tune (although no one wore them in WWI, WWII, Korea, or Vietnam).

Why would you "hope not as well?" I could see how you might say "no, not in my case" but why would you care about others in this context?

Excelsior
06-04-2012, 9:09 AM
i often wear a pair of under-armor batting gloves when i am shooting for extended periods, it saves the webbing between my thumb and finger, its more comfortable when the gun has been sitting in the sun for the last hour while i was shooting something else, and since i am often outdoors and in the hills, they protect my hands from other sharp bits. now, when im ging for longer range precision, i take them off to get a better feel of my trigger. and when i am doing self defense drills with soon to be defensive carry pistols, i dont wear them since i wont be wearing them if the situation should present its self. but shooting paper, bowling pins, clays and other such targets, i wear them. id rather save my hands and be able to shoot a few hundred more rounds, then "feel like a man and never wear gloves." im curious to those that think wearing gloves is a "pussification" do you shoot without eyes and ears too?

How have those gloves held-up in this application? They are the same I have tried and they work real well.

I think those that mentioned "pussification" were simply projecting their own...limitations...

p1choco
06-04-2012, 9:25 AM
I hope not as well.

I see no need to wear them. Perhaps if I were repelling from a helicopter or in combat I would change my tune (although no one wore them in WWI, WWII, Korea, or Vietnam).

Where did you learn your history? Troops wore them when it was appropriate, especially in the cold.

I prefer not using gloves, but while training in the military, I learned to appreciate using them. My favorite were made using a thin layer of kangaroo leather for the palm. And I have had a wrist length pair made using Kangaroo leather. Roo leather can be made half as thick compared to golf glove thickness, will offer a better feel, and wear way longer than your average leather.

Lumpia is sarap!
06-04-2012, 9:40 AM
Tried it once and been bare handed since.

Mongoblack23
06-04-2012, 9:58 AM
How have those gloves held-up in this application? They are the same I have tried and they work real well.

I think those that mentioned "pussification" were simply projecting their own...limitations...

theyve been through around 6000 rounds of 9mm, .40, .45, .223, and who knows how much .22, and i have just starting to gear some small cuts on the right thumb from loading my 1911 mags when my girlfriend steals my uplula... they have worked out great. they are light and they take almost nothing away from my dexterity...

zfields
06-04-2012, 10:10 AM
I wear one on my left hand when shooting action shotgun. Cut my fingers to many times on the receiver and loading gate on my Mossberg.

Call it pussification if you want, but you probably arent doing the same type of shooting as I am.

Lead Waster
06-04-2012, 10:59 AM
Some guys wear them in club matches because after shooting, you have to help reset the targets and setting up steel poppers and plates can really hurt if you get your fingers caught in the plate holders when they snap shut. Or maybe it's cold?

I think for 3 gun, you are doing all sorts of nutty things, so you might want gloves on.

I won't wear them because I don't want to ND because a gloved hand gets stuck on the trigger or something like that. Also, the first match I went to, someone wore gloves and his magazines kept falling out during his run ... because he kept pressing the release with his gloved fingers (Which I guess makes your fingers fatter and you can't feel the button?)

duc748bip
06-04-2012, 11:45 AM
I think we are going to see a shooting glove picture thread coming soon ;)
now i know what to do with that golfing glove i got as a gift and never used.

Cyphre
06-04-2012, 12:11 PM
Pretty sure a lot of people don't even know what 'shooting gloves' are. Mechanix are about the only thing that comes close in that sense (golf gloves are a bit weak in the durability department), but there are already tons of dedicated shooting gloves out there.

The last time I went shooting, I wish I had brought gloves with me. We ended up firing several hundred rounds in 9mm, .40, and .45 and at the end, the tip of my trigger finger was in pain and nearly completely black with carbon. The use of gloves would have mitigated the shock, as well as protected my hand from a variety of things. The person next to us let me try their FN FiveSeven, which had a pretty meatgrind-y texture to the grip that 'takes some getting used to' as he put it.

Shooting gloves can provide a lot of benefits, such as abrasion resistance, shock absorption (in the case of higher calibers), or inclement weather. This even includes hot and cold weather, where you either can't feel your fingers or you have sweaty hands. All of which becomes increasing noticeable to those who happen to shoot more than others, so pay no mind to the resident Chair Force.

Chief-7700
06-04-2012, 12:27 PM
Only when I do repetitive Type 1, Type 2, and Type 3 malfunction drills. My 1911 likes my to make me bleed.

bsg
06-04-2012, 12:34 PM
Pretty sure a lot of people don't even know what 'shooting gloves' are. Mechanix are about the only thing that comes close in that sense (golf gloves are a bit weak in the durability department), but there are already tons of dedicated shooting gloves out there.

The last time I went shooting, I wish I had brought gloves with me. We ended up firing several hundred rounds in 9mm, .40, and .45 and at the end, the tip of my trigger finger was in pain and nearly completely black with carbon. The use of gloves would have mitigated the shock, as well as protected my hand from a variety of things. The person next to us let me try their FN FiveSeven, which had a pretty meatgrind-y texture to the grip that 'takes some getting used to' as he put it.

Shooting gloves can provide a lot of benefits, such as abrasion resistance, shock absorption (in the case of higher calibers), or inclement weather. This even includes hot and cold weather, where you either can't feel your fingers or you have sweaty hands. All of which becomes increasing noticeable to those who happen to shoot more than others, so pay no mind to the resident Chair Force.


some very valid issues pointed out here. it is noteworthy as well... that more and more people are being diagnosed with medical problems that affect the hands; for some folks, gloves are mandatory when shooting.

G38xOC
06-04-2012, 12:35 PM
after seeing pistols kaboom using factory ammo , i wear it all time .

Excelsior
06-04-2012, 1:00 PM
theyve been through around 6000 rounds of 9mm, .40, .45, .223, and who knows how much .22, and i have just starting to gear some small cuts on the right thumb from loading my 1911 mags when my girlfriend steals my uplula... they have worked out great. they are light and they take almost nothing away from my dexterity...

Thanks. Sounds good. I'm going to try them at the next match I shoot.

Excelsior
06-04-2012, 1:09 PM
Pretty sure a lot of people don't even know what 'shooting gloves' are. Mechanix are about the only thing that comes close in that sense (golf gloves are a bit weak in the durability department), but there are already tons of dedicated shooting gloves out there.

The last time I went shooting, I wish I had brought gloves with me. We ended up firing several hundred rounds in 9mm, .40, and .45 and at the end, the tip of my trigger finger was in pain and nearly completely black with carbon. The use of gloves would have mitigated the shock, as well as protected my hand from a variety of things. The person next to us let me try their FN FiveSeven, which had a pretty meatgrind-y texture to the grip that 'takes some getting used to' as he put it.

Shooting gloves can provide a lot of benefits, such as abrasion resistance, shock absorption (in the case of higher calibers), or inclement weather. This even includes hot and cold weather, where you either can't feel your fingers or you have sweaty hands. All of which becomes increasing noticeable to those who happen to shoot more than others, so pay no mind to the resident Chair Force.

I made no mention of "shooting gloves." I mentioned baseball batting gloves and golf gloves -- both world's apart from mechanics' gloves. I am really interested to see if Under Armour batting gloves will last because if they will, they are just about perfect for my needs. I don't think I would wear mechanics' gloves for the most part based on loss of tactile feedback, but I might in some applications.

"Mongoblack23" provided some great feedback saying that his batting gloves have lasted over 6,000 rounds of shooting so far. I suspect members of the "pussification" whiner corps have yet to fire 6K rounds in their entire lives -- if they even own any firearms that is...

Excelsior
06-04-2012, 1:13 PM
I wear one on my left hand when shooting action shotgun. Cut my fingers to many times on the receiver and loading gate on my Mossberg.

Call it pussification if you want, but you probably arent doing the same type of shooting as I am.

If he's actually doing any shooting at all that doesn't include a bar stool...

DTatum
06-04-2012, 1:25 PM
The pussification continues...

Ain't freedom grand :cool2:

HK35
06-04-2012, 1:32 PM
...but you probably arent doing the same type of shooting as I am.
This! Wearing gloves may be called for in certain situations or shooting drills.

Lead Waster
06-04-2012, 2:26 PM
This reminds me of the old "Should I wear workout gloves when I lift weights" debate. I had once opted not to and my hands got all callousy, which I sort of liked. But I also found that wearing them gave me more grip and I didn't need to death grip the bars. That was "back then" now wearing gloves would just slow me down when I eat donuts on the couch. :p

And I think when someone said "Mechanix" they meant "Mechanix brand" not "Mechanic's" as in gloves worn by actual auto mechanic (Mechanix makes those too, but also makes shooting gloves I think).

Anyway, this debate is simply resolved. Go buy a pair of batting/golf/shooting/driving gloves and give them a test run!

geedavell
06-04-2012, 2:37 PM
I've never tried them for shooting but my employer gives us G-TEK work gloves. Pretty durable and excellent grip. You can pick up 10-32 screws without taking them off !

tacticalcity
06-04-2012, 2:37 PM
Gloves decrease your sense of touch, and can actually make the guns harder to hang onto and control. So many people do not use them for that reason.

Some of the man reasons you see gloves worn by professionals are...

1. Required by department because the protect from hazardous chemicals such as those found in flash bangs.

2. Required by department because they are stab proof and you are expected to frisk suspects who may have "sharps" on them and you don't want to get stitches, or worse aids.

3. Your enviorment will contain rocks, broken glass, etc and you will likely be diving for cover and need to protect the skin on your hands.

4. The weather is such that you truly need them to stay warm or preven frost bite.

The least likely reason worn is the shooter feels they aid in their shooting. Sweaty palms, things like that. The loss in the sense of touch usually outweighs this factor. Not always of course. Everybody is different. It's just not all that common for a non-SWAT guy (see # 1 & 2 above) to wear them in normal weather.

More often than not when somebody is wearing gloves at an advanced course, the instructors make everyone remove them. They can be a safety risk depending on your point of view. Lack of feeling can lead to lack of control. If you are already doing some hairy stuff, but not working with chemicals, and the instructors are just meeting you - they'd rather not risk it.

On the rare occassion I wear Gloves I wear Nomex flight gloves. I prefer not to, but sometimes the weather is such that it is required. They have a little too much movement to wear them for the sake of wearing them. However, they offer a surprising amount of warmth for how thin they are, and they are fireproof. Mostly I have them because I got used to them during my years serving in the USAF as a young man.

MustangSteveGT
06-04-2012, 2:38 PM
I use gloves with my Desert Eagle putting .50AE through it. Yes, it does make a difference.
I don't bother using them with my other pistols, rifles or shotgun.

Agent Orange
06-04-2012, 2:57 PM
I use boxing gloves.

HK35
06-04-2012, 3:29 PM
I use boxing gloves.
Great idea, works best for recoil reduction or force-on-force as long as you wrap your hands the legal way!

MisplacedTexan
06-04-2012, 3:39 PM
So I shouldn't start a thread asking if people don nitrate gloves when the clean their guns :innocent:

Excelsior
06-04-2012, 4:00 PM
Gloves decrease your sense of touch, and can actually make the guns harder to hang onto and control. So many people do not use them for that reason.

Some of the man reasons you see gloves worn by professionals are...

1. Required by department because the protect from hazardous chemicals such as those found in flash bangs.

2. Required by department because they are stab proof and you are expected to frisk suspects who may have "sharps" on them and you don't want to get stitches, or worse aids.

3. Your enviorment will contain rocks, broken glass, etc and you will likely be diving for cover and need to protect the skin on your hands.

4. The weather is such that you truly need them to stay warm or preven frost bite.

The least likely reason worn is the shooter feels they aid in their shooting. Sweaty palms, things like that. The loss in the sense of touch usually outweighs this factor. Not always of course. Everybody is different. It's just not all that common for a non-SWAT guy (see # 1 & 2 above) to wear them in normal weather.

More often than not when somebody is wearing gloves at an advanced course, the instructors make everyone remove them. They can be a safety risk depending on your point of view. Lack of feeling can lead to lack of control. If you are already doing some hairy stuff, but not working with chemicals, and the instructors are just meeting you - they'd rather not risk it.

On the rare occassion I wear Gloves I wear Nomex flight gloves. I prefer not to, but sometimes the weather is such that it is required. They have a little too much movement to wear them for the sake of wearing them. However, they offer a surprising amount of warmth for how thin they are, and they are fireproof. Mostly I have them because I got used to them during my years serving in the USAF as a young man.

That is by no means always true...

Paradiddle
06-04-2012, 4:04 PM
That is by no means always true...

Next you will tell him the Glock isn't the finest pistol ever inventory - and then it will be ON!

;)

Cyphre
06-04-2012, 4:11 PM
So I shouldn't start a thread asking if people don nitrate gloves when the clean their guns :innocent:
What kinda sissy bullpucky is that?? If ya ain't got Hoppes in yer blood, ya ain't even a man!

Excelsior
06-04-2012, 4:19 PM
First off - nice trolling in this thread. Second off - I think it looks flat out stupid.

Now you can call me nanette or some other lame word and go on about your day.

While some people have provided some really good inputs, it's remarkable how many people like you simply crapped-on this thread. Losers like you crap-on too many threads on CGF. When you don't get the response you desire you start whining about "trolls" and eventually start demanding that threads you personally do not like be "locked." Ironically enough it's you and people like you that are the real trolls.

I posted this on a serious forum -- "California handguns" and not "The 'off topic' discussion lounge" in the hopes of getting some honest feedback and ideas from people who actually shoot and not crap from losers like you. Unfortunately losers like you cannot seem to control yourselves. Shame on you.

Hoping to get some real feedback (from actual shooters) I also placed the exact some thread on another non-CGF forum. While 1-2 losers like yourself still couldn't control themselves, the thread certainly didn't get crapped on like it did here.

http://www.brianenos.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=153230

Just how seriously do you think anyone is going to take the comment "I think it looks flat out stupid" from a loser like you? Why did you even stop here? Why did you read at least part of the thread? Why did you opine? Did you see a little too much nanette in yourself and you just couldn't remain quiet?

dadoody
06-04-2012, 4:20 PM
Will the wearing of gloves become more and more common in the handgun shooting sports? I remember as a small child watching baseball players very reluctantly adopt a single golf glove. Many never did at all. After decades now most wear two gloves. Will we see this in the shooting shorts?

The reason I asked is that I have seen more and more gloves worn in certain events like 3-Gun. Gloves are also getting better and better. I was at the range and shooting in a steel challenge setting and one of the faster guys pulled on a single golf glove on his right hand (he was a right-handed shooter.) I asked if there was something wrong with this hand he said no, then smiled and said "try it."

I just tried my G17L using two very thin/tactile batting gloves and I must say the grip seems superb. Easily handle a mag replacement without any change. Any comments? Thanks.

They help, but they're a pain to put on and take off all the time, so I focus on adding comfortable grips.

tbc
06-04-2012, 4:37 PM
I have tried them once. I lost most of my finger sensitivity resulted in poor trigger control. The gloves were somewhat thick though.


Sent from my iPhone

The Fugitive
06-04-2012, 4:40 PM
Tried them once, I prefer without.

InkHammer
06-04-2012, 4:42 PM
I wear a pair of Fox Unabomber MTB gloves that I cut the last finger digit length of the pointer and middle finger off. They have ax suede palms, and are padded in the right places and tough! The open two fingers on each glove are great for trigger and mag manipulation , and the bottom two full length are nice for drills and prone shooting. They are really great for the AR and AK , and my hands thank me when shooting the 870.
Oh and yeh I Do wear nitrile gloves when cleaning my guns! Haha

Mongoblack23
06-04-2012, 4:50 PM
sweating hands IS another big reason i use them. like i said earlier, i do my shooting outdoors and i sweat a lot. the thin leather of the batting glove provides me with with a tough layer between my skin and the gun, while not taking too much away from my 'feel' of the gun. it helps me control my sig 225 especially well because of the plastic grips. it also helps tremendously when im shooting clays with my 870. that wood stock gets super slick with sweaty hands. i dont use them when im shooting my 700 because im not moving it much, but i like the most control possible when im moving around with my pistols and my AR and the gloves provide that control for me.

Paradiddle
06-04-2012, 4:53 PM
While some people have provided some really good inputs, it's remarkable how many people like you simply crapped-on this thread. Losers like you crap-on too many threads on CGF. When you don't get the response you desire you start whining about "trolls" and eventually start demanding that threads you personally do not like be "locked." Ironically enough it's you and people like you that are the real trolls.

I posted this on a serious forum -- "California handguns" and not "The 'off topic' discussion lounge" in the hopes of getting some honest feedback and ideas from people who actually shoot and not crap from losers like you. Unfortunately losers like you cannot seem to control yourselves. Shame on you.

Hoping to get some real feedback (from actual shooters) I also placed the exact some thread on another non-CGF forum. While 1-2 losers like yourself still couldn't control themselves, the thread certainly didn't get crapped on like it did here.

http://www.brianenos.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=153230

Just how seriously do you think anyone is going to take the comment "I think it looks flat out stupid" from a loser like you? Why did you even stop here? Why did you read at least part of the thread? Why did you opine? Did you see a little too much nanette in yourself and you just couldn't remain quiet?

Hmmm. Multiple violations of forum rules by immature people like you are what gets your threads locked. Careful what you say about people you don't know - you just might meet them one day.

You attacked everyone that said they didn't like gloves or saw no point - and then you wonder why when they sling a little back at you. You are obviously defending what you believe to be cool or worthwhile - do not degrade people who don't agree with you. Running 3 gun and wearing gloves is slightly different from wearing them at your local indoor range.

PS - funny how you didn't attack the guys that goofed on gloves over on the BE forum, including the guy who posted a picture of Jackson's glove.

tacticalcity
06-04-2012, 5:07 PM
That is by no means always true...

How so? I ask nicely. Not picking a fight. Friendly debate, not drop the "gloves" and brawl time.

To my knowledge, no glove has ever been invented that does not result in a noticable loss of sense of touch.

Putting something, anything between your skin and the object you are holding is going to decrease your sensitivity and sense of touch. Even something as thin as a condom cuts your sense of touch in half, if not more so. Shooting gloves are considerably thicker than a condom. Even Mechanix.

Now if you mean that to you personally feel the benefits of whatever glove you use outweigh that loss of sensitivity, or that to your way of thinking it is not a huge deal that I can accept and have no argument. We all have our own individual quirks and preferrances. Somethings bother some more than others. What I hate about gloves, might not bug you at all. I can only point out my observations, and pass along the observations that were passed along to me on the subject by shooting professionals and instructors when the subject comes up. If you don't share those opinions, it's no skin off my back.

But the laws of the physical world apply to us all my friend. As good as gloves like Mechanix are at limiting the loss of sense of touch and slippage, they still result in a large loss of sensitivity. Too much for my taste. I have yet to see anything reduce it more than Mechanix that provide any benefit. Surgical gloves would offer more feeling, but other than to look cool in a crime movie or TV show I cannot imagine why anyone would want to wear them while shooting.

So you might as well say up is down, the world is flat, etc. Your comment as written makes no sense.

Excelsior
06-04-2012, 5:13 PM
Hmmm. Multiple violations of forum rules by immature people like you are what gets your threads locked. Careful what you say about people you don't know - you just might meet them one day.

You attacked everyone that said they didn't like gloves or saw no point - and then you wonder why when they sling a little back at you. You are obviously defending what you believe to be cool or worthwhile - do not degrade people who don't agree with you. Running 3 gun and wearing gloves is slightly different from wearing them at your local indoor range.

PS - funny how you didn't attack the guys that goofed on gloves over on the BE forum, including the guy who posted a picture of Jackson's glove.

You're just digging yourself a deeper hole. I asked a serious question on a serious forum ("California handguns") and not on "The 'off topic' discussion lounge." While there is excellent and continued valuable feedback from some there is also pure crap from losers like you. Why is it that you and other losers can't control yourselves? It's not simply this thread, it's many, many threads here on CGF. Why can't you remain from spewing crap on an honest thread seeking a real exchange of information and ideas? Is it simply a matter of you seeking attention?

I didn't "attack" anyone that did not crap on this thread for absolutely no reason. That's simply a lie on your part. I don't think wearing gloves is "cool" as you suggest but I do think they might have some value, hence this thread. A thread that would be one heckuva lot more useful if losers like you could control yourselves and not crap on it simply to bring attention to yourselves.

mindofarock
06-04-2012, 5:22 PM
Ironclad Tac-Ops Gloves bought them for 20 bucks off amazon.
Not only to protect the hand, keeps gun shot "residue" off.

InkHammer
06-04-2012, 5:23 PM
You're just digging yourself a deeper hole. I asked a serious question on a serious forum ("California handguns") and not on "The 'off topic' discussion lounge." While there is excellent and continued valuable feedback from some there is also pure crap from losers like you. Why is it that you and other losers can't control yourselves? It's not simply this thread, it's many, many threads here on CGF. Why can't you remain from spewing crap on an honest thread seeking a real exchange of information and ideas? Is it simply a matter of you seeking attention?

I didn't "attack" anyone that did not crap on this thread for absolutely no reason. That's simply a lie on your part. I don't think wearing gloves is "cool" as you suggest but I do think they might have some value, hence this thread. A thread that would be one heckuva lot more useful if losers like you could control yourselves and not crap on it simply to bring attention to yourselves.

Dude, you need to relaaaaxxx... You are quite honestly making yourself look pretty childish. If posts are bothering you, ignore and move on to those that fit your stringent criteria.

VictorFranko
06-04-2012, 5:24 PM
Excelsior,
Your comments to other members are downright rude.
Considering your attitude, these shooting gloves should fit you just fine :p

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81iIrXDcYLL._SL1500_.jpg

tacticalcity
06-04-2012, 5:24 PM
sweating hands IS another big reason i use them. like i said earlier, i do my shooting outdoors and i sweat a lot. the thin leather of the batting glove provides me with with a tough layer between my skin and the gun, while not taking too much away from my 'feel' of the gun. it helps me control my sig 225 especially well because of the plastic grips. it also helps tremendously when im shooting clays with my 870. that wood stock gets super slick with sweaty hands. i dont use them when im shooting my 700 because im not moving it much, but i like the most control possible when im moving around with my pistols and my AR and the gloves provide that control for me.

I actually experienced the opposite problem. Sweat or no sweat I experienced a lot of slippage of the gloves themselves (just a tiny little bit but enough to make me weary). Plus it was hot, and wearing gloves causes me to sweat more than usual which causes even more slippage. Mechanix are said not to do this as much as flight gloves or other shooting gloves, but provide little to no warmth. At least not the ones that reduce slippage of the fabric and materials. Usually when I wear gloves, it is because it is cold. I train regardless of the weather.

So I think this is a "to an each his own" sort of thing. I've only heard a handful of people say they prefer them however. And that is not including plinkers (since sweat would not big a huge issue for them comparitively speaking) but people that actually run and gun and work up a sweat while shooting like you and I do. Usually those guys list the reasons I posted above as to why they wear them, if they wear them.

Excelsior
06-04-2012, 5:31 PM
How so? I ask nicely. Not picking a fight. Friendly debate, not drop the "gloves" and brawl time.

To my knowledge, no glove has ever been invented that does not result in a noticable loss of sense of touch.

Putting something, anything between your skin and the object you are holding is going to decrease your sensitivity and sense of touch. Even something as thin as a condom cuts your sense of touch in half, if not more so. Shooting gloves are considerably thicker than a condom. Even Mechanix.

Now if you mean that to you personally feel the benefits of whatever glove you use outweigh that loss of sensitivity, or that to your way of thinking it is not a huge deal that I can accept and have no argument. We all have our own individual quirks and preferrances. Somethings bother some more than others. What I hate about gloves, might not bug you at all. I can only point out my observations, and pass along the observations that were passed along to me on the subject by shooting professionals and instructors when the subject comes up. If you don't share those opinions, it's no skin off my back.

But the laws of the physical world apply to us all my friend. As good as gloves like Mechanix are at limiting the loss of sense of touch and slippage, they still result in a large loss of sensitivity. Too much for my taste. I have yet to see anything reduce it more.

So you might as well say up is down, the world is flat, etc.

I was responding to this:

Gloves decrease your sense of touch, and can actually make the guns harder to hang onto and control. So many people do not use them for that reason.

by saying: "That is by no means always true..."

First, depending on the type of gloves and the application they can in some cases make the firearm more difficult to retain and control but that's not always the case. I don't think you would disagree with that.

Now let's focus on the decrease of "sense of touch." That might always be true from a physical sense but it's certainly no always true from a practical sense. Let me give two examples. During competition a firearm can get so hot to the touch that much of the practical sensitivity gets lost in pain. Our focus becomes that of NOT feeling, or of NOT burning ourselves. We make subconscious grip changes or we hurry the shots to end the painful encounter. This may well not be true if we were wearing gloves. We might actually feel more if there was a tiny bit more insulation.

The other side would be if we injured our hand before our during competition. Our subconscious desire not to cause more damage might cause our hands to compensate in a way (grip change, etc.) to lesson the tactile feedback we receive. With gloves that may not be the case. We might actually feel "more." Same goes with sweating. We become so preoccupied with hanging onto our firearms that we grip the thing even tighter and in the process we lose grip sensitivity. This might not be the case if we were wearing gloves.

Excelsior
06-04-2012, 5:35 PM
Dude, you need to relaaaaxxx... You are quite honestly making yourself look pretty childish. If posts are bothering you, ignore and move on to those that fit your stringent criteria.

It's not a matter of "stringent criteria." It's about watching threads getting crapped-on because some lack self control. I think those that look "childish" are those that do the crapping on different threads.

InkHammer
06-04-2012, 5:49 PM
You are exhibiting quite a display of "Lack of self control" yourself, moreso than anyone else in this abortion of a thread... I feel embarrassed for having posted in it.

tacticalcity
06-04-2012, 5:50 PM
I was responding to this:

Gloves decrease your sense of touch, and can actually make the guns harder to hang onto and control. So many people do not use them for that reason.

by saying: "That is by no means always true..."

First, depending on the type of gloves and the application they can in some cases make the firearm more difficult to retain and control but that's not always the case. I don't think you would disagree with that.

Now let's focus on the decrease of "sense of touch." That might always be true from a physical sense but it's certainly no always true from a practical sense. Let me give two examples. During competition a firearm can get so hot to the touch that much of the practical sensitivity gets lost in pain. Our focus becomes that of NOT feeling, or of NOT burning ourselves. We make subconscious grip changes or we hurry the shots to end the painful encounter. This may well not be true if we were wearing gloves. We might actually feel more if there was a tiny bit more insulation.

The other side would be if we injured our hand before our during competition. Our subconscious desire not to cause more damage might cause our hands to compensate in a way (grip change, etc.) to lesson the tactile feedback we receive. With gloves that may not be the case. We might actually feel "more."

So basically it was the entire post you dissagreed with, not just the portion you highlighted. Makes more sense now.

Allow me to retort.

During competition you're not sending enough rounds down range to burn yourself. You shoot for a very short period of time, and then another shooter gets their turn. During training however it is more than possible, though not all that likely unless you are just wasting lead and not actually training to improve, i.e. paying attention to your consistancy, mixing up your drills and going dry when you start to go wide, etc. Pushing through when you are performing badly usually just makes it worse, hence trigger control drills and so forth. Competition shootings do a lot more than just poor lead down range all day.

Honestly, a lot of the competition guys do things for the cool factor. One guy does it, then another, pretty soon all the cool kids are doing it so they do it as well. In a sport you are looking for every possible edge real or imagined. Even fake things can give you a pshycological edge. If you think it helps, then it helps.

I train defensively, "combat shooting" to use the technical term that always gets noobs panties in a bunch. Like a competition shooter that means the round count is extremely high during my 8 hour training days. But it also means I am not just throwing lead down range. I push myself to my limits, but I also do corrective drills when I start to open up too much. I spend as much time running dry doing drills as not. My Glock and 1911 both get very hot. But not hot enough to burn my hands. My m4 gets very hot as well, but not the areas I actually come into contact with. You learn after the first mistake not to grab your rifle by the front sight post or barrel.

The best reason I've heard for a non-SWAT guy is one I failed to mention above. Prevention of slide bite. Some people, myself included, have very meaty hands. Their oversized web of skin between their thumb and trigger finger can slip into the path of the slide even when gripping the gun properly. And at speed you do not have the luxury of adjusting your grip. What you get is what you get. Once, or even ten times it's not a big deal. It only leaves a small scratch. But on an 8 hour training day, that scratch can quickly become a legitimate gash. There are however, other solutions for this. Not all guns can cause slide bite. One of my favorites is notorious for it however. They make a device that pins onto the back of the Glock to stop it. A lot of competition guys are using them.

Excelsior
06-04-2012, 6:12 PM
So basically it was the entire post you dissagreed with, not just the portion you highlighted. Makes more sense now.

Allow me to retort.

During competition you're not sending enough rounds down range to burn yourself. You shoot for a very short period of time, and then another shooter gets their turn. During training however it is more than possible, though not all that likely unless you are just wasting lead and not actually training to improve, i.e. paying attention to your consistancy, mixing up your drills and going dry when you start to go wide, etc. Pushing through when you are performing badly usually just makes it worse, hence trigger control drills and so forth. Competition shootings do a lot more than just poor lead down range all day.

That's just not the case all the time. I've shot in some matches where each shooter runs though each stage several times in a row. Guns can get mighty hot (from shooting) fairly easily. Burns seem to come about when something unusual happens -- trouble clearing a jam or something along those lines.

Honestly, a lot of the competition guys do things for the cool factor. One guy does it, then another, pretty soon all the cool kids are doing it so they do it as well. In a sport you are looking for every possible edge real or imagined. Even fake things can give you a pshycological edge. If you think it helps, then it helps...

It may be "cool" in your neck of the woods. It's certainly not here. Those that do wear gloves seem to do so in an almost apologetic manner. Glove use is fairly new in competitive shooting compared to glove use in say baseball.

If I was a marketing individual for someone like Under Armour I would be looking very closely at this market -- although it's probably minuscule by most sporting goods standards.

capturedlive
06-04-2012, 6:21 PM
I don't apologize for wearing gloves when I shoot my Ruger New Blackhawk .327. Don't need them for any of the semi's, though.

Packy14
06-04-2012, 8:50 PM
I definitely wear nitrile gloves when I clean my guns, why would I want to absorb lead and other heavy metals into my bloodstream? Sometimes calguns gets really tired with all the tough guy comments. I don't see people going up to people at the range talkin trash to people wearing gloves... if u aint gonna say it in person, maybe just don't say it online either, otherwise you are a PUNK.

lilro
06-04-2012, 9:41 PM
Batting gloves with the index fingers cut to the first knuckle work well. Get a nice solid grip, and you don't lose any feel on the trigger squeeze.

Excelsior
06-04-2012, 11:04 PM
Batting gloves with the index fingers cut to the first knuckle work well. Get a nice solid grip, and you don't lose any feel on the trigger squeeze.

Great feedback. This is precisely the sort of ideas I hoped to see when I posted this topic. Thanks!

m98
06-04-2012, 11:15 PM
I use glove when i gotta run drills shootn, reloadin, crawling or lotsa shootin offhand when its scorchin hot out.

The guys that says gloves=pansy obviously dont shoot much, shoot just off the bench on nice days out or Have Absolutely no firearm shooting experience whatsoever, other than just pure armchair cod mw professional.

NSR500
06-04-2012, 11:34 PM
I only wear gloves when I use my throwdown gun.

Grumpyoldretiredcop
06-04-2012, 11:51 PM
I've worn gloves in the past when the job called for them (mostly having to do with physical surroundings, weather, or need to search folks with a habit of hiding sharp things). I also took time to practice things as simple as writing (you'd be surprised how what you thought were thin gloves can change how you do that) as well as weapon handling.

Nowadays, having no job need, the gloves stay in the gear bag unless I actually manage to fire enough shots from a rifle to heat it uncomfortably (rare these days) or I go shooting and have to leave weapons on an unshaded surface. The last time I went to a match in Nevada, I was very happy to have those gloves in the bag as the temps were in the triple digits, there wasn't enough shade for everyone's guns, and some were Class 3 and tended to heat up a just a trifle.

Having a good pair of shooting gloves is a good idea IMO, even if you don't think you'll be using them often. If you do have them, practice in them a little bit and you won't feel clumsy when you put them on.

fullrearview
06-05-2012, 12:37 AM
I train with and without, with all of my weapons. At least 3 months out the year, I'm working in freezing temps. Even during the summer months, I'm hiking harsh terrain with a full load out, so in that case, it's better to have and not need.

JaeOne3345
06-05-2012, 8:49 AM
So basically it was the entire post you dissagreed with, not just the portion you highlighted. Makes more sense now.

Allow me to retort.

During competition you're not sending enough rounds down range to burn yourself. You shoot for a very short period of time, and then another shooter gets their turn. During training however it is more than possible, though not all that likely unless you are just wasting lead and not actually training to improve, i.e. paying attention to your consistancy, mixing up your drills and going dry when you start to go wide, etc. Pushing through when you are performing badly usually just makes it worse, hence trigger control drills and so forth. Competition shootings do a lot more than just poor lead down range all day.

Honestly, a lot of the competition guys do things for the cool factor. One guy does it, then another, pretty soon all the cool kids are doing it so they do it as well. In a sport you are looking for every possible edge real or imagined. Even fake things can give you a pshycological edge. If you think it helps, then it helps.


We do things for the cool factor? Like what? What on a competition rig is just cool? MY 2011 isn't cool, it just works. My CR Speed/Double Alpha rig isn't cool, but rather works for competition. I'd say all of the equipment I use for pistol and 3 gun matches is 100% based on functionality. I would also say the way I break down a stage in and every time is 100% for functionality. Functionality in this case meaning being the fastest and most accurate.

Being cool? This could definitely be applied to all the fake operators I know who get fully decked out for their "classes" and pose as if they are hardcore gunfighters who actually SUCK at the actual job of shooting/handling their weapons. No disrespect to the guys who are actually great at training/defense, but I have seen far too many classes with 20 guys on a line dressed up like Costa, getting yelled at by somebody with no credentials while doing what are some of the most basic drills known to man. But wait, they are dressed like the real thing! They must be cool! I often see the defensive/operator types come over and try USPSA at our local ranges, get their asses kicked, and then say the same thing about looking cool, etc.

Don't make such an assumption. Just as many defensive types do it "be cool." It happens on both sides.

And high round count? That's another can of worms people don't wanna open. It takes extremely long days of shooting to get the top level of a match.

BucDan
06-05-2012, 9:39 AM
I bet the trend would move to leather gloves, and then something "revolutionary" that is exactly like a sticky football glove.

sneather
06-05-2012, 10:29 AM
I shoot with these: http://people.rit.edu/~pxn2927/320/project2/media2/Gloves/wolfglove.jpg

They work well.

zfields
06-05-2012, 10:47 AM
Jeez. I just use the same gloves I have for moving lumber/furniture/yard work etc.

MustangSteveGT
06-05-2012, 10:55 AM
I just use a set of mechanix gloves. They arent even that thick. It just gives a little extra layer between the thumb and index finger to absorb the .50 ae impulse. The glove is plenty thin enough to not interfere with the trigger and doubles as a glove for working on my cars and other various tasks. They slip off or on pretty quickly with no straps or anything. They have served me well with the Desert Eagle.
Sometimes I shoot outdoors on the ground on rocks and hot surfaces. These help for that too.

MudCamper
06-05-2012, 11:07 AM
Man up, nancy. Gloves are for girls and Internet badasses.

I guess I'm a girl then.

I use gloves when shooting my Ruger Super Redhawk 44 magnum. If I don't use gloves, after shooting a box of 50 rounds, I end up bleeding in two places. While shooting one-handed, the lower back edge of the hammer spur comes back like a knife edge and hits the web of my thumb. When shooting two-handed, the steel edge protruding from the wood grip just a little bit can sometimes slam/slice into my support hand's palm. Wearing gloves alleviates all these problems.

I guess I could shoot some sissy caliber instead, but where's the fun in that? ;)

Briancnelson
06-05-2012, 11:14 AM
I tend to wear a pair of thin Camelbak gloves when I'm outdoors hiking, shooting, or whatever, if I think I might have to go digging after hot brass somewhere *****ly, or what have you. I like them for my rifles, as I tend to wear gloves when I hunt anyway, for the hiking, so it's good practice. Also, it keeps my hand from getting smoked if the hand guard isn't doing its job on my AR, or if I accidentally come in contact with hot metal.

Indoor pistol shooting, not so much. Not that I care if anyone else does it, but I don't notice that it makes my hand feel much better, and its just an extra thing I don't need with me. I will wear them indoors sometimes to protect cuts or injuries to the hand when shooting however, like the time I had lacerations from my car door and a couple of stitches/bandages. I occasionally wish to have them when I'm collecting brass, sometimes I can't wait for it to cool down a minute after shooting, as the vultures at the range will swoop in for the kill before I can collect it, and 10mm brass is expensive.

Shenaniguns
06-05-2012, 11:17 AM
I never wear gloves period.

clutchy
06-05-2012, 11:19 AM
I wear gloves shooting my rifles but haven't started yet w/ the pistol. maybe i'll try it.

Excelsior
06-05-2012, 2:50 PM
Thanks for all the good inputs. This has been a very worthwhile thread after all...

STI
06-05-2012, 7:13 PM
I recently started wearing gloves and I like how my hands stay clean after shooting for hours. Before I started wearing gloves my hands would get black, especially after shooting a lot of Blazer .22. I'm still searching for the perfect pair though, going to have to look into those under armour gloves.

HighLander51
06-05-2012, 7:25 PM
Will the wearing of gloves become more and more common in the handgun shooting sports?
The reason I asked is that I have seen more and more gloves worn in certain events like 3-Gun.

You have seen gloves in 3 Gun because if you are a right handed shooter, and load the shotgun by rolling it over in your left hand, it is to prevent the hot barrel from burning your hand. That's all. There is no advantage to wearing gloves in competition.

Excelsior
06-05-2012, 7:37 PM
You have seen gloves in 3 Gun because if you are a right handed shooter, and load the shotgun by rolling it over in your left hand, it is to prevent the hot barrel from burning your hand. That's all. There is no advantage to wearing gloves in competition.

So you say. It seems like a lot depends on the shooter, how much experience they have using gloves, the sort of gloves they use and most of all, how open minded they are to new ideas/applications.

tbc
06-05-2012, 7:59 PM
OP's question made me curious so I looked up in YouTube last night for all professional handgun competitive shooters (i.e. World shoot XVI).

Well, from those videos, none of those pros had gloves on their hands. But then again, the weather in the videos appeared to be very hot.

The only guy I saw wearing gloves was Nutnfancy.


Sent from my iPhone

Irv
06-05-2012, 8:06 PM
I definitely wear nitrile gloves when I clean my guns, why would I want to absorb lead and other heavy metals into my bloodstream? Sometimes calguns gets really tired with all the tough guy comments. I don't see people going up to people at the range talkin trash to people wearing gloves... if u aint gonna say it in person, maybe just don't say it online either, otherwise you are a PUNK.

I will say one thing that is anyone thinking it is not manly to use nitrile gloves for cleaning with Hoppes 9 you are doing a dis-service to yourself and family. From the position I worked in I have used a lot of nasty chemicals and if you think this Hoppes isn't, all I am going to say is go online and read the MSDS to this product. You should always check MSDS on all chemicals you use without gloves. On some people I'll guarantee it will come back to haunt them.

Lead Waster
06-05-2012, 9:09 PM
I'm pretty sure glove usage has nothing to do with masculinity! I just wear them to match my stockings. :p

loosewreck
06-05-2012, 9:27 PM
I wore a padded pistol glove on my shooting hand every time I shot a wood gripped 357 snubby I used to have.

I've also had to wear a glove on my support hand once. This was because I forgot to trim my nails and they literally were cutting into the palm of my support hand.

I keep a pair of Mechanix Gloves in my range bag just in case I might need them.

Squidward
06-05-2012, 9:33 PM
I only wear them when surfing the internet. Safety first! :43:

JaeOne3345
06-05-2012, 9:36 PM
I just tried my G17L using two very thin/tactile batting gloves and I must say the grip seems superb. Easily handle a mag replacement without any change. Any comments? Thanks.

Maybe your grip and reloads just need work? How much time have you spent actually drilling?

What are you gonna do when you forget your gloves the day of a match?

It's cool to try such things, but don't rely on them.

There is such a thing as too much grip especially with reloads. I had Dawson grip tape on my STI 2011 limited gun and it was hard to flip the gun in my hands for the mag release/mag changes. It was too tacky.

So I stippled my grip on my gun and now it has just enough grip for handling but also not too much that it slows my reloads down.

I can tell you that repeatedly doing drills has helped my match shooting more than any gear ever will. Don't get caught up on gear band aids.

locosway
06-06-2012, 12:24 AM
Will the wearing of gloves become more and more common in the handgun shooting sports? I remember as a small child watching baseball players very reluctantly adopt a single golf glove. Many never did at all. After decades now most wear two gloves. Will we see this in the shooting shorts?

The reason I asked is that I have seen more and more gloves worn in certain events like 3-Gun. Gloves are also getting better and better. I was at the range and shooting in a steel challenge setting and one of the faster guys pulled on a single golf glove on his right hand (he was a right-handed shooter.) I asked if there was something wrong with this hand he said no, then smiled and said "try it."

I just tried my G17L using two very thin/tactile batting gloves and I must say the grip seems superb. Easily handle a mag replacement without any change. Any comments? Thanks.

If you've played baseball, you know why you'd wear gloves. In shooting, I see no reason to wear gloves unless you're doing some duty related things, and even then it can get in the way.

Excelsior
06-06-2012, 1:31 AM
You responded to this:

...I just tried my G17L using two very thin/tactile batting gloves and I must say the grip seems superb. Easily handle a mag replacement without any change. Any comments? Thanks.

with this:

Maybe your grip and reloads just need work? How much time have you spent actually drilling?

What are you gonna do when you forget your gloves the day of a match?

It's cool to try such things, but don't rely on them.

There is such a thing as too much grip especially with reloads. I had Dawson grip tape on my STI 2011 limited gun and it was hard to flip the gun in my hands for the mag release/mag changes. It was too tacky.

So I stippled my grip on my gun and now it has just enough grip for handling but also not too much that it slows my reloads down.

I can tell you that repeatedly doing drills has helped my match shooting more than any gear ever will. Don't get caught up on gear band aids.

Why would you ask if my grip and reloads need work based on what I posted? :confused:

I wouldn't forget my gloves. They would become part of my kit. What do you do when you forget your guns?

"Rely" on them? :confused:

Drilling is always important. Drilling would be an important part of adding gloves to one's shooting.

Gloves would be more more "band aids" than the things you mentioned.

Excelsior
06-06-2012, 1:34 AM
If you've played baseball, you know why you'd wear gloves. In shooting, I see no reason to wear gloves unless you're doing some duty related things, and even then it can get in the way.

Grip.

Hand protection.

There's too biggies for you right off the bat. I don't see how you could even make such a universal claim when there is so much variation to so many different types of shooting.

daybreak
06-06-2012, 5:04 AM
Because he personally doesn't see a need, duh. You listed two reasons why YOU would wear gloves. He did not say: There is no reason to wear gloves.

HighLander51
06-06-2012, 5:43 AM
So you say. It seems like a lot depends on the shooter, how much experience they have using gloves, the sort of gloves they use and most of all, how open minded they are to new ideas/applications.

Have you ever actually shot a 3 Gun match, or any competition match like USPSA/IDPA or Steel Challenge? Nobody wears gloves, except for loading the shotgun.

Did you read tbc's comment, NO ONE at the World Shoot wore gloves.

Nutfancy is NOT a competition shooter.

JaeOne3345
06-06-2012, 11:24 AM
Why would you ask if my grip and reloads need work based on what I posted? :confused:

I wouldn't forget my gloves. They would become part of my kit. What do you do when you forget your guns?

"Rely" on them? :confused:

Drilling is always important. Drilling would be an important part of adding gloves to one's shooting.

Gloves would be more more "band aids" than the things you mentioned.

It is simply a question bro. Nevermind. You ask people for their opinion. Nobody was flaming you. I have seen people talk about gloves helping them with grip and both reloads/fumbling. That is why. You took it as if it was a statement totally off basis.

Forgetting guns? Bad analogy. I have seen smaller things like ear plugs and eye pro forgotten. That is why I said that.

On my G34 I just got some Gorilla Grip from Chris at cpwsa.com. It has just the right amount of tackiness. Try that. With that on my G34 I found no use for gloves.

You should go to a big national match and ask these same questions to many of the GM shooters. See what they say.

In my experience, my grip got better without any use for gloves from just continuous shooting and competing each and every weekend.

Do you exercise? Try some dead lifts and pulling exercises that force you to use your grip strength. Don't use any bull**** straps or other aids you see people use in the gym.

The guys over on brianenos.com always recommend those "Captains of Crush" grip exercise tools, but I find no need. Olympic lifts requiring you to grip the bar will do the same thing.

And yes, I said rely. I have seen numerous shooters at matches who use grip enhancement liquids like Pro Grip and Prince Grip (that tennis players use) and when they don't have it, they freak out. I am merely sharing my observations from actual experiences at matches. I am not just making **** up. lol.

At the end of the day, if it works for you, then just do it. No need finding some sort of validation on a forum for something you seem to have already made up your mind about. Just use the damn things, lol.

Excelsior
06-06-2012, 12:13 PM
Have you ever actually shot a 3 Gun match, or any competition match like USPSA/IDPA or Steel Challenge? Nobody wears gloves, except for loading the shotgun.

Did you read tbc's comment, NO ONE at the World Shoot wore gloves.

Nutfancy is NOT a competition shooter.

Yes I have. Actually I have seen people wear gloves at 3-Gun and ICORE matches. The fact that "NO ONE at the World Shoot wore gloves" (I'm not even sure if that's true) is not proof that gloves won't become popular in the future. As noted they were long shunned in baseball and football too.

I'm trying to engage forward-thinking people here who will evaluate the use of gloves based on their merits and not one what they saw doing youtube searches. Forward thinking is definately a foreign concept to some here.

I'm not sure why you felt the need to bring up nutnfancy so I will ignore it.

JaeOne3345
06-06-2012, 12:32 PM
Just use the gloves dude. You like them. Use them. Who cares if they will become common or not. As long as they work for YOU, and YOU feel they offer an advantage to your shooting, who gives a **** about whether or not they will become common among the general population of shooters in the future. What other folks do currently or in the future really has no bearing on your progression as a shooter. You have already made your decision anyway.

Do YOU. Use them.

skyscraper
06-06-2012, 1:10 PM
Hey look it's another thread you started and got your feelings hurt. Like others said, just use the gloves Rambo.

Iknownot
06-06-2012, 1:27 PM
There are these amazing things called rubber grips, or grip tape, or strap checkering. All things that provide grip with out reducing tactile sensation.

I'm not sure why you'd forgo any of those things for wearing gloves instead.

The only times I could see wearing gloves is if it is 1) really cold or 2) for whatever reason my hands needed protection.

If neither of those things is happening, for regular trips to the range, why would you bother?

Do you wear driving gloves all the time for a better "grip" on your steering wheel?

It's just silly.

Paradiddle
06-06-2012, 1:42 PM
Yes I have. Actually I have seen people wear gloves at 3-Gun and ICORE matches. The fact that "NO ONE at the World Shoot wore gloves" (I'm not even sure if that's true) is not proof that gloves won't become popular in the future. As noted they were long shunned in baseball and football too.

I'm trying to engage forward-thinking people here who will evaluate the use of gloves based on their merits and not one what they saw doing youtube searches. Forward thinking is definately a foreign concept to some here.

I'm not sure why you felt the need to bring up nutnfancy so I will ignore it.

I just wanted to "save" this post.

SDM44
06-06-2012, 3:03 PM
I wear gloves when it's cold outside and we're shooting, like the mid-Jan pistol class I took. Really cold so the gloves I wore really helped out.

If it's sunny outside, I won't wear any gloves because I don't want any tan lines on my hands :).

Excelsior
06-06-2012, 6:37 PM
There are these amazing things called rubber grips, or grip tape, or strap checkering. All things that provide grip with out reducing tactile sensation.

I'm not sure why you'd forgo any of those things for wearing gloves instead.

The only times I could see wearing gloves is if it is 1) really cold or 2) for whatever reason my hands needed protection.

If neither of those things is happening, for regular trips to the range, why would you bother?

Do you wear driving gloves all the time for a better "grip" on your steering wheel?

It's just silly.

Your premise is flawed. One need not "forgo" grip or tactile sensation if they chose to wear gloves. You're offering your personal opinion as if it was fact and it's not.

Excelsior
06-06-2012, 6:42 PM
Just use the gloves dude. You like them. Use them. Who cares if they will become common or not. As long as they work for YOU, and YOU feel they offer an advantage to your shooting, who gives a **** about whether or not they will become common among the general population of shooters in the future. What other folks do currently or in the future really has no bearing on your progression as a shooter. You have already made your decision anyway.

Do YOU. Use them.

Relax. I just wanted some feedback. I got some very good feedback along with some crap. Yeah, yeah, I know, one is supposed to simply ignore the crap but it gets a little old non listening to the same group of Dale Gribbles crapping up threads.

So you know, you're quite wrong when you suggest "You have already made your decision anyway." You don't know that based on what I said. The dearth of critical thinking on these forums by some is...difficult.

Iknownot
06-06-2012, 7:10 PM
Your premise is flawed. One need not "forgo" grip or tactile sensation if they chose to wear gloves. You're offering your personal opinion as if it was fact and it's not.

If you are putting a barrier between your skin and the object you are holding, you are by definition reducing tactile sensation. If you think otherwise, I really don't know what to say.

Or do people use oven mits just for craps and giggles?

HighLander51
06-06-2012, 8:39 PM
Yes I have. Actually I have seen people wear gloves at 3-Gun and ICORE matches.

I'm not sure why you felt the need to bring up nutnfancy so I will ignore it.

Ok, where did you shoot a 3 Gun match at? How many? USPSA MutltiGun, or Outlaw 3 Gun? Ignore anything you want, fancynut is not a competitive shooter, period. If you have actually shot a 3 gun match, local,or not, just say where, name the match and the club, otherwise why bring it up. And speaking of ICORE, have you actually shot an ICORE match, or just watched? You may bull**** the newbies, but you are not fooling anyone who really shoots competitive matches on a regular basis.

Just tell the truth, or post up a vid of you shooting a 3 gun, or any match, for that matter.

It's real ****ing simple, if gloves resulted in faster times, then all the USPSA Grand Masters would be using them, they are not.

SuperSet
06-06-2012, 9:11 PM
Like anything, the situation will dictate your equipment.
In competition, if I foresee the need to move from standing to rapid prone, the first thing that'll hit the ground is my support hand to cushion my fall. If I look around me and all I see are remnants of nails, splintered wood from target stands, rusted-out casings, then I'm going to put on a glove on my support hand so it doesn't get torn up when I slam it into the ground. A glove is also nice when dealing with the newer, lighter carbon fiber handguards which feel extremely unpleasant after pressing off 20-30 rounds while baking in the California summer sun.
Outside of that, I don't remember seeing any gloves in competition except for those situations. You will see them quite a bit in carbine class due to the amount of time you'll have the weapon system in your hands and manipulating something that has a lot of sharp corners to it. For pistol, not so much.

BlackDrop50
06-06-2012, 10:12 PM
Train like you fight. I don't wear gloves to sleep.

NewbieDave
06-06-2012, 10:36 PM
No gloves for just pistol... but if s rifle is involved, I usually slap on some gloves. No "ouchy" when touching FSB after dumping a beta-mag, LOL.

SuperSet
06-06-2012, 10:37 PM
If you truly train like you fight, you should take the course in your PJs or boxers and without hearing or eye protection. You don't sleep with those either.

zfields
06-06-2012, 10:55 PM
If you truly train like you fight, you should take the course in your PJs or boxers and without hearing or eye protection. You don't sleep with those either.

Or in my case, butt naked with a spare mag clenched between my buns in fear.

Sent from my Incredible 2 using Tapatalk 2

Excelsior
06-07-2012, 12:22 AM
If you are putting a barrier between your skin and the object you are holding, you are by definition reducing tactile sensation. If you think otherwise, I really don't know what to say.

Or do people use oven mits just for craps and giggles?

See posting #77.

Excelsior
06-07-2012, 12:23 AM
If you truly train like you fight, you should take the course in your PJs or boxers and without hearing or eye protection. You don't sleep with those either.

NICE!! ;)

Excelsior
06-07-2012, 12:43 AM
Have you ever actually shot a 3 Gun match, or any competition match like USPSA/IDPA or Steel Challenge? Nobody wears gloves, except for loading the shotgun.

Did you read tbc's comment, NO ONE at the World Shoot wore gloves.

Nutfancy is NOT a competition shooter.

Ok, where did you shoot a 3 Gun match at? How many? USPSA MutltiGun, or Outlaw 3 Gun? Ignore anything you want, fancynut is not a competitive shooter, period. If you have actually shot a 3 gun match, local,or not, just say where, name the match and the club, otherwise why bring it up. And speaking of ICORE, have you actually shot an ICORE match, or just watched? You may bull**** the newbies, but you are not fooling anyone who really shoots competitive matches on a regular basis.

Just tell the truth, or post up a vid of you shooting a 3 gun, or any match, for that matter.

It's real ****ing simple, if gloves resulted in faster times, then all the USPSA Grand Masters would be using them, they are not.

You really don't get it, do you? There's more to evaluating the question I asked then youtubing a few matches and then proclaiming something you don't know, namely "if gloves resulted in faster times, then all the USPSA Grand Masters would be using them, they are not." They may not be wearing gloves but that does not necessarily mean they wouldn't possibly be faster if they did. Absurd you say! They would do it if would make them faster! That's not necessarily the case.

Some may simply have your limited mindset. Some may not want to detract from their existing training regimes to spend the time to integrate gloves into their shooting. Some are no doubt rightfully leery of what might be a lengthy learning curve. Some might not want to chance messing with a perfect balance it took them years to achieve Some no doubt are leery about being trendsetters etc. etc. There were golf gloves available in Babe Ruth's day and he never wore them yet it's almost certain he would have benefited if he would have. Stretch your mind just a touch and start to consider such things.

You compound your mistake by trying to suggest that if it's not used by GM's then it cannot be good. That's just garbage. There is a huge difference between spending years and years full time trying to hone one's shooting style and then integrating a new variable versus some B or C that might actually have some limitations where gloves would provide immediate help.

Things just aren't always as "****ing simple" as you might think them to be, hotshot. In other words I'm not buying your steer manure. Finally I'm not sure what your obsession is with nutnfancy but I'd rather not hear any more about it.

Iknownot
06-07-2012, 1:02 AM
See posting #77.

I can't believe I'm even bothering but post 77 illustrated why you MAY want to wear gloves, as in very specific situations, not why anyone would need to wear them all the time, which is what you really seem to be advocating.

If you look at my post, I agree that there may be specific situations for gloves, but why you would need them for a normal range trip, or even a class or a competition is beyond me.

Just admit you think you look cool wearing them and move on. None of your arguments make any sense in the normal 99 % of situations most people on these boards would find themselves participating in the hobby or sport of shooting and for the other 1% most people in the thread agree with you gloves might be useful.

If you want to wear gloves, knock yourself out. However, to see yourself as some amazing forerunner in creating a whole new idea when gloves have probabaly been around for longer than firearms, is just a bit silly. You don't think people shooting 100 years ago would have used gloves if they did anything beyond protect your hands from cold or rocks?

BlackDrop50
06-07-2012, 6:02 AM
If you truly train like you fight, you should take the course in your PJs or boxers and without hearing or eye protection. You don't sleep with those either.

I'm already halfway blind and deaf and I fight naked to scare intruders. They don't let me go like that to the range though....

Mongoblack23
06-07-2012, 9:57 AM
I'm already halfway blind and deaf and I fight naked to scare intruders. They don't let me go like that to the range though....

imagine the places to accidently catch hot brass.....:D

Excelsior
06-07-2012, 11:44 AM
I can't believe I'm even bothering but post 77 illustrated why you MAY want to wear gloves, as in very specific situations, not why anyone would need to wear them all the time, which is what you really seem to be advocating.

If you look at my post, I agree that there may be specific situations for gloves, but why you would need them for a normal range trip, or even a class or a competition is beyond me.

Just admit you think you look cool wearing them and move on. None of your arguments make any sense in the normal 99 % of situations most people on these boards would find themselves participating in the hobby or sport of shooting and for the other 1% most people in the thread agree with you gloves might be useful.

If you want to wear gloves, knock yourself out. However, to see yourself as some amazing forerunner in creating a whole new idea when gloves have probabaly been around for longer than firearms, is just a bit silly. You don't think people shooting 100 years ago would have used gloves if they did anything beyond protect your hands from cold or rocks?

Where do you come up with this steer manure? If anything it's the exact opposite -- one feels just a bit odd going against the grain on stuff like this. Gloves are definitely not "cool" where I shoot. None of my comments make sense to YOU. That's something that YOU have to come to grips with.

Excelsior
06-07-2012, 11:45 AM
Or in my case, butt naked with a spare mag clenched between my buns in fear.

Sent from my Incredible 2 using Tapatalk 2

High capacity?

Paradiddle
06-07-2012, 11:57 AM
They may not be wearing gloves but that does not necessarily mean they wouldn't possibly be faster if they did. Absurd you say! They would do it if would make them faster! That's not necessarily the case.

Some may simply have your limited mindset. Some may not want to detract from their existing training regimes to spend the time to integrate gloves into their shooting. Some are no doubt rightfully leery of what might be a lengthy learning curve. Some might not want to chance messing with a perfect balance it took them years to achieve Some no doubt are leery about being trendsetters etc. etc. There were golf gloves available in Babe Ruth's day and he never wore them yet it's almost certain he would have benefited if he would have. Stretch your mind just a touch and start to consider such things.


You are entertainingly arrogant. Do you think for a minute that the guys that compete at the top of the game haven't tried everything. Do you really think a guy that shoots 100,000 rounds a year would have a "steep learning curve" when it comes to gloves? These are the guys trying to shave 100ths of a second off their reload time. Their thinking of the game (especially after Enos published his book) is far far beyond you, and most of us. The game of professional combat/action shooting has become very advanced both in mental and physical aspects since Cooper started it in Big Bear.

Do you know Ruth's career numbers? Hard to think he would/could have been any better then he was. Hope you realize that when he hit 60 homeruns he hit more homeruns then every team in the league except for 2 or 3. Let that sink in that would mean a modern player (with batting gloves) would have to hit over 200 HRs in a season to equal that feat.

There are many modern players that do not wear gloves. Wearing batting gloves while swinging a bat does not provide any improvement in your ability to SEE the ball and react with a perfect swing.

Talk about bull****....you are shoveling it at such a proficient rate I bet your back hurts.

Iknownot
06-07-2012, 12:28 PM
Where do you come up with this steer manure? If anything it's the exact opposite -- one feels just a bit odd going against the grain on stuff like this. Gloves are definitely not "cool" where I shoot. None of my comments make sense to YOU. That's something that YOU have to come to grips with.

Why would you WANT to wear gloves for ANYTHING if you did not HAVE to?

There are plenty of grip options (have you tried hogue warp around rubber grips?) that provide plenty of grip that there is no real reason to wear gloves unless there is a specific condition you are trying to protect against, such as cold or sharp objects.

And when it comes down to it, how often does the average shooter, in participating, in their hobby, come across these conditions? Not very often.

So where do the gloves come in?

Even someone in competition or a class, who is shooting more than the average person at a trip to the range, is going to be taking breaks. How many rounds are you going to be do all at once? 50? 100? Your hands can't hold up to 100 rounds in 2 or 3 or 5 minutes before you get a break?

Yet again, where do gloves come into this, especially if you have a set of comfy rubber grips or other grip device?

The fact that you are so stuck on this idea boggles my mind. It's like you are looking for a unicorn holding a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. They're just gloves man. I don't see people, in real life anywhere, wearing them that often unless it's really cold outside or they are handling sharp objects, or they are doing a lot of physical work and want to avoid blisters or tears on their hands.

Don't you think there is a reason for this? Perhaps, people don't like having their hands covered up because they are an important part of our sensory system and we don't like the loss of tactile sensation and fine motor control ability? Perhaps?

Nah...... Anyway, I'm done. Knock yourself out wearing your gloves 24/7 at the range.

Excelsior
06-07-2012, 1:36 PM
I hope not as well.

I see no need to wear them. Perhaps if I were repelling from a helicopter or in combat I would change my tune (although no one wore them in WWI, WWII, Korea, or Vietnam).

You are entertainingly arrogant. Do you think for a minute that the guys that compete at the top of the game haven't tried everything. Do you really think a guy that shoots 100,000 rounds a year would have a "steep learning curve" when it comes to gloves? These are the guys trying to shave 100ths of a second off their reload time. Their thinking of the game (especially after Enos published his book) is far far beyond you, and most of us. The game of professional combat/action shooting has become very advanced both in mental and physical aspects since Cooper started it in Big Bear.

Do you know Ruth's career numbers? Hard to think he would/could have been any better then he was. Hope you realize that when he hit 60 homeruns he hit more homeruns then every team in the league except for 2 or 3. Let that sink in – that would mean a modern player (with batting gloves) would have to hit over 200 HRs in a season to equal that feat.

There are many modern players that do not wear gloves. Wearing batting gloves while swinging a bat does not provide any improvement in your ability to SEE the ball and react with a perfect swing.

Talk about bull****....you are shoveling it at such a proficient rate I bet your back hurts.

And you are resoundlying ignorant. Just look at your comment "...(although no one wore them in WWI, WWII, Korea, or Vietnam)..." Pure steer manure. Do you think you're to be taken seriously after that?

I think the top pro shooters of today and past generations have put a great deal into developing and honing their styles. You're simply ignorant if you think it would be a cinch for them to integrate a new variable into their routines. It might well be different one day if juniors begin wearing gloves at an early stage of development. It might also be different if someone like Jerry Michulek or Rob Leatham started wearing gloves for whatever reason including an injury. You'd likely see younger shooters follow suit and the practice might well grow in popularity.

I think of how two-handed competitive point shooting of pistols only began to take off in the 1950's when Jack Weaver began using the technique (along with the stance named after him) with success in competition where it was subsequently endorsed by luminaries like Jeff Cooper. Do you really think two-handed shooting of revolvers had not at least been experimented with for the 100+ years that they had existed by that point? Do you really believe that custom and machismo ("real men shoot with one hand!") didn't play a part in keeping the technique from being more widely adopted? How long did the Army teach one-handed shooting of the M1911? Why the resistance to change? Certainly not because there was benefit to using both hands.

You show your inability to think when you speak about Babe Ruth. Your comment "Hard to think he would/could have been any better then he was." is simply your guess. You don't know. You offer this comment because you have nothing to refute what I typed. If you were actually a student of Ruth's career you'd know that he also struck out more than anyone, so he did have room to improve despite his remarkable career. Striking out (or hitting a dinger) is largely a product of bat control and grip is a part of that. That's precisely why it is VERY rare to see ballplayers today not wearing batting gloves. Hey, there's a good question for you. Why do just about ALL ballplayers wear batting gloves today? That seems to be overwhelming evidence that at least some benefit is derived by wearing batting gloves at the plate.

Keep on going but I'll never back down to someone like you.

Excelsior
06-07-2012, 1:45 PM
Why would you WANT to wear gloves for ANYTHING if you did not HAVE to?

There are plenty of grip options (have you tried hogue warp around rubber grips?) that provide plenty of grip that there is no real reason to wear gloves unless there is a specific condition you are trying to protect against, such as cold or sharp objects.

And when it comes down to it, how often does the average shooter, in participating, in their hobby, come across these conditions? Not very often.

So where do the gloves come in?

Even someone in competition or a class, who is shooting more than the average person at a trip to the range, is going to be taking breaks. How many rounds are you going to be do all at once? 50? 100? Your hands can't hold up to 100 rounds in 2 or 3 or 5 minutes before you get a break?

Yet again, where do gloves come into this, especially if you have a set of comfy rubber grips or other grip device?

The fact that you are so stuck on this idea boggles my mind. It's like you are looking for a unicorn holding a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. They're just gloves man. I don't see people, in real life anywhere, wearing them that often unless it's really cold outside or they are handling sharp objects, or they are doing a lot of physical work and want to avoid blisters or tears on their hands.

Don't you think there is a reason for this? Perhaps, people don't like having their hands covered up because they are an important part of our sensory system and we don't like the loss of tactile sensation and fine motor control ability? Perhaps?

Nah...... Anyway, I'm done. Knock yourself out wearing your gloves 24/7 at the range.

The fact that you won't recognize that wearing gloves is of benefit to some people boggles MY mind. There is no question that gloves benefit some. That's proven by this thread alone. My question is if their use will ever become common?

Iknownot
06-07-2012, 1:56 PM
I don't think you are actually reading what I'm writing. But that's okay. I hope you enjoy your cash money prize when you finally win at the Internet.

skyscraper
06-07-2012, 2:31 PM
Greatest thread ever hahaha

Paradiddle
06-07-2012, 3:07 PM
You show your inability to think when you speak about Babe Ruth. Your comment "Hard to think he would/could have been any better then he was." is simply your guess. You don't know. You offer this comment because you have nothing to refute what I typed. If you were actually a student of Ruth's career you'd know that he also struck out more than anyone, so he did have room to improve despite his remarkable career. Striking out (or hitting a dinger) is largely a product of bat control and grip is a part of that. That's precisely why it is VERY rare to see ballplayers today not wearing batting gloves. Hey, there's a good question for you. Why do just about ALL ballplayers wear batting gloves today? That seems to be overwhelming evidence that at least some benefit is derived by wearing batting gloves at the plate.

Keep on going but I'll never back down to someone like you.

Got you with some facts - which doesn't seem to be hard to do in your case. In fact Babe Ruth is NO WHERE NEAR THE TOP OF THE LIST IN CAREER STRIKEOUTS. Do some research. You will find out the all time strikeout king wore number 44 and not number 3 (PS - since you are such an expert - tell me why Ruth's number is 3?)

All of the modern players do not wear gloves - many still bat without them. Like shooting, or driving nails, gloves most often offer PROTECTION - not PERFORMANCE. Some sports and activities - like football - are different because they use those sticky gloves which do increase your ability to hold onto a hard thrown football.

Someone like me is rich - maybe I'll see you around at the range - I'll look for the guy wearing gloves.

Paradiddle
06-07-2012, 3:08 PM
I don't think you are actually reading what I'm writing. But that's okay. I hope you enjoy your cash money prize when you finally win at the Internet.

I need to shoot an elephant - at a 1000 yards - what caliber would you suggest?

:)

skyscraper
06-07-2012, 3:13 PM
I need to shoot an elephant - at a 1000 yards - what caliber would you suggest?

:)

Forget about caliber, it's not a factor in the equation... What matters is if you're wearing gloves or not.

Iknownot
06-07-2012, 3:22 PM
With out gloves, why not 577 T-Rex?

With gloves, .357 magnum out of a S&W Model 27. Maybe 44 mag out of a Model 29, if your gloves aren't quite up to spec.

Excelsior
06-07-2012, 4:52 PM
Got you with some facts - which doesn't seem to be hard to do in your case. In fact Babe Ruth is NO WHERE NEAR THE TOP OF THE LIST IN CAREER STRIKEOUTS. Do some research. You will find out the all time strikeout king wore number 44 and not number 3 (PS - since you are such an expert - tell me why Ruth's number is 3?)

All of the modern players do not wear gloves - many still bat without them. Like shooting, or driving nails, gloves most often offer PROTECTION - not PERFORMANCE. Some sports and activities - like football - are different because they use those sticky gloves which do increase your ability to hold onto a hard thrown football.

Someone like me is rich - maybe I'll see you around at the range - I'll look for the guy wearing gloves.

Ruth DID strike out more than anyone else in his era. Do some research before you pop-off. Almost ALL modern players wear batting gloves including those who aren't about to take an extra base. Your belief that players wear gloves only for protection is absurd.

I'll look for you as you wander around in circles looking for the restroom...

Excelsior
06-07-2012, 4:53 PM
Forget about caliber, it's not a factor in the equation... What matters is if you're wearing gloves or not.

I could see how you would believe that...

Excelsior
06-07-2012, 5:05 PM
Jack Weaver: "I think I'm going to use the new stance I have been working on and use both of my hands to aim and fire my gun this weekend at the match."

Paradiddle: "Do you think for a minute that the guys that compete at the top of the game haven't tried everything?!"

Jack Weaver: "Pardon me." (while walking away.)

Iknownot
06-07-2012, 5:17 PM
Nevermind.

JaeOne3345
06-07-2012, 8:37 PM
Jack Weaver: "I think I'm going to use the new stance I have been working on and use both of my hands to aim and fire my gun this weekend at the match."

Paradiddle: "Do you think for a minute that the guys that compete at the top of the game haven't tried everything?!"

Jack Weaver: "Pardon me." (while walking away.)

Then why don't you just use the gloves without being concerned about what other people think, or worrying about whether or not they will become popular in the future.

Weaver just used the damn stance. Just use the gloves! It's really simple.

You feel as though they will offer an advantage, so just use em.

Paradiddle
06-07-2012, 8:44 PM
Then why don't you just use the gloves without being concerned about what other people think, or worrying about whether or not they will become popular in the future.

Weaver just used the damn stance. Just use the gloves! It's really simple.

You feel as though they will offer an advantage, so just use em.

And deny the interweb his genius and "forward thinking"!!!

NEVER I SAY NEVER!!!!

This thread still doesn't come close to the elephant thread - that was Calguns at its height.

Excelsior
06-07-2012, 9:24 PM
And deny the interweb his genius and "forward thinking"!!!

NEVER I SAY NEVER!!!!

This thread still doesn't come close to the elephant thread - that was Calguns at its height.

Go watch a few more youtube clips... :rolleyes:

Excelsior
06-07-2012, 9:25 PM
Then why don't you just use the gloves without being concerned about what other people think, or worrying about whether or not they will become popular in the future.

Weaver just used the damn stance. Just use the gloves! It's really simple.

You feel as though they will offer an advantage, so just use em.

I suspect he thought about doing it in competition long and hard before he finally did. Though you seem to be getting frustrated for some reason, others have shared valuable information herein.

JaeOne3345
06-07-2012, 9:38 PM
I am not frustrated at all. It just seems like you should make evaluation from actually putting this INTO PRACTICE. All this message forum speculation is just that, speculation.

Go get a timer, some ammo, run some drills, with and without gloves, etc. Evaluate differences in safety, with and without gloves. Evaluate, evaluate, evaluate.

For this type of question, the only way to know is to just put it into practice. See if in fact they do work for you. If so, ROCK ON. Use em.

It's real simple. You have an idea. Try it. Test it. Make changes, and decide whether or not to keep this change into your collection of things that work.

See you at a match!

marsco
06-07-2012, 11:38 PM
I could see using gloves in cold weather .
But other than that callus build up works fine for me .

LOW2000
06-09-2012, 12:00 PM
Here are a few reasons that I wear gloves when shooting on occasion.

1) Weapons manipulations training where you are rapidly sliding your hands over sharp objects (charging handles, rail systems, rear sights, shotgun loading ports, etc, etc). Can I do it without gloves? Sure, and it is generally easier and faster to accomplish anything without them, but there are times where slicing my hands open isn't at the top of my list.

2) Shooting from unorthodox positions, transition between positions. If I am going from standing, to kneeling, to urban prone, back to standing, shooting from barricades, etc. I do not want to drop down to prone and have my hand come straight down on a piece of brass pointing straight up and punching a hole in my palm like a paper hole puncher if I don't absolutely have to. I have shot with bloody hands, but I try to avoid it. Also bracing a weapon against a sheet of plywood, door jamb, or car bumper then firing can sometimes beat the hell out of your hands, again, while I have done it without and know what it feels like, there is no reason to injure myself unnecessarily.

3) There may be a time when it is cold, raining, or some other reason i'm already wearing gloves and it is good to know what is going to be different or what limitations you have when wearing different gloves (slide release, mag release, etc).

4) High round count training courses. If I am shooting 2500 rounds over 3 days, you will accumulate cuts, nicks, sore spots, etc on your hands. First off, I try to keep as much lead and chemicals out of my body as possible. Secondly, I would rather focus on the training and shooting and get as much out of the course as possible rather than focusing on that spot on my finger that is getting rubbed raw. If someone says some train like you fight nonsense about the pain here, if I am shooting 2500 rounds in 3 days for real, then I have made some poor choices in life to get me in that situation.

For competition shooting, 90%+ of the time, I do not wear gloves, they do reduce feel for the gun, they do make it harder to mitigate recoil (as the fabric moves and compresses, there is more movement of the weapon, it may feel nicer to your hands, but there is always a tradeoff), they do impact your ability to feel trigger break and reset.

Here you can see at one point in a class I was really working on my trigger control, so I took off my right glove to improve my feel for the trigger:

http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/408840_10150502174781190_1724032802_n.jpg

Excelsior
06-09-2012, 12:30 PM
Here are a few reasons that I wear gloves when shooting on occasion.

1) Weapons manipulations training where you are rapidly sliding your hands over sharp objects (charging handles, rail systems, rear sights, shotgun loading ports, etc, etc). Can I do it without gloves? Sure, and it is generally easier and faster to accomplish anything without them, but there are times where slicing my hands open isn't at the top of my list.

2) Shooting from unorthodox positions, transition between positions. If I am going from standing, to kneeling, to urban prone, back to standing, shooting from barricades, etc. I do not want to drop down to prone and have my hand come straight down on a piece of brass pointing straight up and punching a hole in my palm like a paper hole puncher if I don't absolutely have to. I have shot with bloody hands, but I try to avoid it. Also bracing a weapon against a sheet of plywood, door jamb, or car bumper then firing can sometimes beat the hell out of your hands, again, while I have done it without and know what it feels like, there is no reason to injure myself unnecessarily.

3) There may be a time when it is cold, raining, or some other reason i'm already wearing gloves and it is good to know what is going to be different or what limitations you have when wearing different gloves (slide release, mag release, etc).

4) High round count training courses. If I am shooting 2500 rounds over 3 days, you will accumulate cuts, nicks, sore spots, etc on your hands. First off, I try to keep as much lead and chemicals out of my body as possible. Secondly, I would rather focus on the training and shooting and get as much out of the course as possible rather than focusing on that spot on my finger that is getting rubbed raw. If someone says some train like you fight nonsense about the pain here, if I am shooting 2500 rounds in 3 days for real, then I have made some poor choices in life to get me in that situation.

For competition shooting, 90%+ of the time, I do not wear gloves, they do reduce feel for the gun, they do make it harder to mitigate recoil (as the fabric moves and compresses, there is more movement of the weapon, it may feel nicer to your hands, but there is always a tradeoff), they do impact your ability to feel trigger break and reset.

Here you can see at one point in a class I was really working on my trigger control, so I took off my right glove to improve my feel for the trigger:



Thank you for your insightful reply. That's just the soft of feedback I was seeking...

Iknownot
06-10-2012, 10:19 AM
Thank you for your insightful reply. That's just the soft of feedback I was seeking...

So you thank a guy that gives you reasons 1) protection, 2)protection, 3) cold, 4)protection and then said that normally he wouldn't wear them because they do affect feel and tactile touch and manipulation.

You do realize that nearly everyone else you had comments for and disagreed with in this thread said pretty much the same thing?

Right?

sreiter
06-10-2012, 10:58 AM
Man up, nancy. Gloves are for girls and Internet badasses.

This reminds me of guys who walk into the gym with 2 gallons of water and leather gloves, even though they can't lift more than 20lbs for the life of them.

No thanks

Yeah, because all the operators around the world who wear nomex gloves are nothing but women and internet badasses :rolleyes:

EmmaGoldman
06-10-2012, 1:43 PM
I have a pair of thin, fairly tight leather gloves that I sometimes wear for shooting handguns. I find that the constriction across the back of my hand provides better support for single action revolvers that like to ride down in the hand under recoil. I can do the same thing by gripping real hard, but that causes fatigue which can interfere with my shooting.

Excelsior
06-11-2012, 2:03 PM
I have a pair of thin, fairly tight leather gloves that I sometimes wear for shooting handguns. I find that the constriction across the back of my hand provides better support for single action revolvers that like to ride down in the hand under recoil. I can do the same thing by gripping real hard, but that causes fatigue which can interfere with my shooting.

Very insightful and interesting feedback. Thanks.