PDA

View Full Version : 1911 Titanium Firing Pins?


Valegian
05-27-2012, 10:35 AM
Are they really any better than steel pins? I was given a McCormick titanium firing pin (new) as a gift for my RIA Tactical. Will I Even notice the benefits? Thank you for all your input.

Press Check
05-27-2012, 11:12 AM
No drawback, but no real benefit, and if your RIA is on the CA Roster, you should already have a Ti FP, no different than my Springfield 1911.

In California, manufacturers use a Ti FP and heavy return spring to pass the California drop test to reduce the chances of an AD, but that shouldn't be construed as the pistol being drop safe. In theory, a Ti FP will not develop enough inertia to ignite a chambered round.

Valegian
05-27-2012, 11:27 AM
Bought my RIA tactical (non-rail) here in CA brand new a few months back. Just pulled the stock firing and it is pretty heavy compared to the Ti pin. It's all black and looks like steel. Going to drop in Ti one in and test it out. I will give an update after I test it. Thank you again.

Press Check
05-27-2012, 11:41 AM
If you have a steel FP and switch to the Ti FP without going to a heavier spring, light strikes will probably occur.

If the goal is lock-time, that is simply not going to happen with a stand-alone Ti FP. In that case, among other components, you would be interested in a Ti hammer, Ti hammer strut, a lighter main-spring cap (etc), but even in that case, the difference will not overwhelmingly notable, especially if you're not capable of MOA groups at 25 yards.

ChaneRZ
05-27-2012, 12:33 PM
Light strikes won't occur unless you go with lighter firing pin spring. Titanium is lighter than steel. With stock spring, the titanium fp will travel faster than the steel.

littlejake
05-27-2012, 1:05 PM
No drawback, but no real benefit, and if your RIA is on the CA Roster, you should already have a Ti FP, no different than my Springfield 1911.

In California, manufacturers use a Ti FP and heavy return spring to pass the California drop test to reduce the chances of an AD, but that shouldn't be construed as the pistol being drop safe. In theory, a Ti FP will not develop enough inertia to ignite a chambered round.

That pretty well sums it up. I swapped the Ti FP in my SA 1911 for the Ed Brown steel FP part number 816. Also changed the FP spring to a Wilson Combat Extra Power. SA uses a smaller tip FP than a mil spec 1911.

http://i923.photobucket.com/albums/ad76/NETTUEMsc4V92qMY/SA1911A1firingpins.jpg

Press Check
05-27-2012, 1:38 PM
Light strikes won't occur unless you go with lighter firing pin spring. Titanium is lighter than steel. With stock spring, the titanium fp will travel faster than the steel.

If there was a steel FP in there, the FP spring is probably somewhere between 22-24, which is too light for a Ti FP. You cannot simply change from steel to Ti without moving to a heavier spring. The FP spring in my Springfield is 28.

Valegian
05-27-2012, 2:43 PM
Thank you all for the great information. That is why I love Calguns.

MT1
05-27-2012, 3:25 PM
You guys are mixing up your spring ID's, Springfield uses the Ti firing pin and a heavier firing pin spring...then they use a 28# main spring to compensate and avoid light strikes.

littlejake
05-27-2012, 3:48 PM
You guys are mixing up your spring ID's, Springfield uses the Ti firing pin and a heavier firing pin spring...then they use a 28# main spring to compensate and avoid light strikes.

28#:confused: Perhaps that works in the SA MSH that has a different plunger due to the ILS.

I swapped out SA MSH's for an Ed Brown and the correct MSH pins and plunger for a regular MSH. I started with a 23# MS that's sort of the standard for a mil 1911. That gave me a trigger pull that exceeded my 8# trigger pull gauge. I then put in a 19# MS and got a trigger in the 7# range. I was looking for around 7# trigger pull as I consider less than 7# unsafe for a single action combat pistol. 4 to 5 pounds is OK for a target 1911 where is gets loaded only at the range with muzzle down range.*

*Underlined is my opinion. Above that is factually what I did.

sammy
05-27-2012, 4:14 PM
My 2 Baers came with titanium firing pins which both bent. The Permier II bent after 3000 rounds and the TRS after 14,000. I am using Wilson Combat carbon steel units which have been 100% so far. Cheaper too. No difference

NoHeavyHitter
05-27-2012, 4:29 PM
In California, manufacturers use a Ti FP and heavy return spring to pass the California drop test to reduce the chances of an AD, but that shouldn't be construed as the pistol being drop safe. In theory, a Ti FP will not develop enough inertia to ignite a chambered round.

To me this is a HUGE bonus because I'm not a fan of series 80 1911's.

Gryff
05-27-2012, 5:12 PM
The theory is that the reduced weight of the Ti firing pin means a faster lock time, and therefore more accuracy because the gun has less time to move between when you pull the trigger and when the firing pin strikes the primer.

Not sure it would make a difference on a gun that isn't competition oriented.

MT1
05-27-2012, 6:01 PM
28#:confused: Perhaps that works in the SA MSH that has a different plunger due to the ILS.

I swapped out SA MSH's for an Ed Brown and the correct MSH pins and plunger for a regular MSH. I started with a 23# MS that's sort of the standard for a mil 1911. That gave me a trigger pull that exceeded my 8# trigger pull gauge. I then put in a 19# MS and got a trigger in the 7# range. I was looking for around 7# trigger pull as I consider less than 7# unsafe for a single action combat pistol. 4 to 5 pounds is OK for a target 1911 where is gets loaded only at the range with muzzle down range.*

*Underlined is my opinion. Above that is factually what I did.


The measurable difference in trigger pull between a 28# and a 23# main spring is about 3oz, the middle leaf of the sear spring has the major control of trigger weight.

As for what is safe, IMO 4.5lbs is fine even for a carry gun, the trigger isn't going to pull itself, and if you've got your finger on the trigger and then take up the slack you're about to shoot so the final pull weight between 4 & 7 lbs doesn't really matter.

Snoopy47
05-27-2012, 6:28 PM
Light strikes won't occur unless you go with lighter firing pin spring. Titanium is lighter than steel. With stock spring, the titanium fp will travel faster than the steel.

I believe a lighter “main spring” will result in lighter strikes.

The firing pin spring “returns” the pin backward, it doesn’t release the pin forward.

So actually a “heavier” pin spring might induce a light strike, but that would have to be a lot more heavier to overcome the power of the main spring and hammer.

M. D. Van Norman
05-27-2012, 6:32 PM
You would need a pretty light mainspring to induce light strikes in an m1911-series pistol.