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View Full Version : 9 mm vs. .40 accuracy?


Buck13
05-26-2012, 8:29 AM
I'm planning to get a full-sized pistol primarily as a range toy, but having a little more effective caliber is tempting for the rare times I'd carry it hiking or something. With cheaper ammo (say up to $0.40/round), is there any inherent difference in accuracy between the 9 mm and .40SW?

ihavenoidea
05-26-2012, 8:42 AM
Accuracy can deal with a lot a factors, the number one factor is the shooter, I can shoot a 9mm better than a 40 sw, but there are a lot of people out there who will argue the oposite, I chose 9mm because it's cheaper to practice with and good HD ammo is easy to find, best thing to do is try both calibers and see what suits you,

Mossy Man
05-26-2012, 8:54 AM
9mm is easier to master due to lower recoil

especially if its a range toy, there's no reason NOT to get 9mm instead

fullspeed1
05-26-2012, 9:10 AM
Accuracy can be achieved with anything based on your basic fundamentals....

ZombieTactics
05-26-2012, 9:29 AM
Accuracy is a term which cannot be sensibly attributed to a caliber.

cebuvfr
05-26-2012, 9:31 AM
If it's primarily a range toy, I'd go for a 9 because recoil is softer and ammo is cheaper.

Mr.1904
05-26-2012, 9:37 AM
9mm is easier to control in follow up shots. Making it more accurate with follow up shots.

socalbowhunter
05-26-2012, 9:44 AM
Accuracy is a term which cannot be sensibly attributed to a caliber.

:iagree:

scglock
05-26-2012, 10:10 AM
If it's for range use, might as well go with 9mm. But try both out and see which one you like

giantsfan
05-26-2012, 10:11 AM
9mm is easier to master due to lower recoil



That's not always true. I have an LC9 and it's recoil is greater than that of my PT140.

I had a Walther PPK/S .380 that had a more abrupt recoil than my Model 59 S&W 9mm so much so that, while the caliber was smaller, it was uncomfortable to shoot and I sold it. I was more accurate with the 59 for sure.

My opinion is that the accuracy depends on more than just the shooter. Caliber vs. frame size vs. ammo vs. shooter experience and training all play a part in accuracy.

That said, apples to apples, G19 to G23 comparison for example, the recoil would be slightly less in the G19 to G23. Is that an accurate statement or would it be much more pronounced?

My point is that it isn't all about caliber.

toby77
05-26-2012, 10:13 AM
Range gun I say a 9mm, it's just cheaper to shoot with

Bastard
05-26-2012, 10:19 AM
Accuracy can be achieved with anything based on your basic fundamentals....
:iagree:

edit; I guess socalbowhunter beat me too it, but I do still agree. also agree that I need to stop opening up 15 tabs & missing the more recent posts

chering88
05-26-2012, 10:24 AM
The sounds like another "Its the indian not the arrow" question :)

markw
05-26-2012, 10:55 AM
These guys are right, caliber has very little to do with accuracy. It's more the platform that you're shooting it from. My CZ75B has very low recoil compared to my XD40 shooting the same ammo. Go with 9mm in a fullsized, the gun will absorb more recoil.

hefedehefe
05-26-2012, 11:00 AM
.40 is more accurate and deadly , but harder to master:biggrinjester:

markw
05-26-2012, 11:07 AM
If you can find one, go for a CZ75 SP01 in 9mm. Full sized, very accurate, and priced right. CZ's are a good bang for the buck.

hefedehefe
05-26-2012, 11:10 AM
.40 you can convert most guns to 9mm and 357SIG. 9mm not so much. I have an XD40 and a 9mm conversion barrel and I have a Sig Pro 40 with a 357SIG barrel. I dont think you can convert any 9mm. .40 is my favorite to shoot. Much more fun than 9mm IMO, but today I will shoot my 357SIG for the first time :D

markw
05-26-2012, 11:15 AM
True, I forgot about that. Been meaning to pick up an 9mm barrel for my 75B.

Ubermcoupe
05-26-2012, 11:22 AM
I'm planning to get a full-sized pistol primarily as a range toy, but having a little more effective caliber is tempting for the rare times I'd carry it hiking or something. With cheaper ammo (say up to $0.40/round), is there any inherent difference in accuracy between the 9 mm and .40SW?

EDIT: Zombie Tactics beat me to it:
Accuracy is a term which cannot be sensibly attributed to a caliber.


Round size is only one of numerous factors that will affect accuracy.
You will also need to consider:
Bullet weight
Power of loading/FPS
Bullet design
Barrel length
Gun design
how you hold said gun
etc...

If you need something for the range - the 9mm will do you fine as the ammo is relatively cheaper - especially with FMJ reloads. If you get a Glock 22/23/35 you can always get a 9mm barrel and shoot the best of both worlds - it just costs more $.

9mm and .40 are both effective defense for two-legged types, anything else and I would upgrade to 10mm - but that is an entirely different bucket of worms.

Legasat
05-26-2012, 11:25 AM
You can get accurate with anything.....with enough practice

fullspeed1
05-26-2012, 11:37 AM
You can get accurate with anything.....with enough practice

FTW!

missiontrails
05-26-2012, 2:38 PM
9mm is lower recoil, higher muzzle velocity, and way cheaper to shoot. .40 costs almost as much as .45... I have owned a Sig P220, HK USP40, Glock 21....... I'm sticking with 9mm for the long haul.

Sanderhawk
05-26-2012, 2:43 PM
I have gotten pretty accurate with my XD40 but it has taken practice. Getting ready to buy a XD45 next. I can`t wait :)

tbhracing
05-26-2012, 2:49 PM
Tagged

dem0critus
05-26-2012, 3:28 PM
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=576667

Just read this about stopping power. Awesome info on comparison of the "effectiveness" of different calibers. Long story short: choose what you're more accurate with.

afm223
05-26-2012, 7:25 PM
For myself I am equally accurate with my g19 and my g22. I feel like the g22 is easier to shoot accurately but the paper tells the truth that with either gun I can put about 50% of my shots at 7 yards within a one inch group.

chrisf
05-26-2012, 7:57 PM
Honestly between my sigma .40 and m&p 9mm. I can shoot left handed more accurate with the .40 than I can while trying to aim with the 9mm. Dont know why but I love the .40.

chrisf
05-26-2012, 7:57 PM
Honestly between my sigma .40 and m&p 9mm. I can shoot left handed more accurate with the .40 than I can while trying to aim with the 9mm. Dont know why but I love the .40.

missiontrails
05-26-2012, 8:30 PM
Honestly between my sigma .40 and m&p 9mm. I can shoot left handed more accurate with the .40 than I can while trying to aim with the 9mm. Dont know why but I love the .40.

Sigma? Yuck. That M&P is a much better designed piece (in any caliber) than that cheapo Sigma....

pyromensch
05-26-2012, 8:59 PM
you have a greater margin for error, considering the diameter of the round :)...like a millimeter

Rorge Retson
05-26-2012, 9:00 PM
I'd say barrel length and amount of practice are more relevant than caliber when it comes to accuracy...

USMC 82-86
05-26-2012, 9:23 PM
It all depends on the platform a lot of times. I have a Sig P226 in .40 and it is accurate but there is a definite muzzle jump with this gun vs my HK in .40 cal. I have a G19 and it is a very accurate gun and while I don't own a G23 YET. I have tried this gun at the range several times. The G23 for me is every bit as manageable my HK but with a little more felt thump. The recoil of the G23 for some reason allows me to acquire the target very quick for follow up shots. I am also very accurate with the G23 in fact my best group with the G23 is better than my best with my G19. The recoil feels more like a push to the rear, same with my HK even though the bore axis is higher. My Sig feels more like a flip type of recoil.

I would try a few because they will all feel a little different based on their design.

locosway
05-26-2012, 9:40 PM
Accuracy is a term which cannot be sensibly attributed to a caliber.

Maybe not a caliber, but a round yes. Some rounds are improved upon until they're very accurate, while others aren't.

But, this is mostly for rifles. In handguns, at least in the normal SD/HD calibers, it doesn't matter.

Cato
05-26-2012, 9:49 PM
The sounds like another "Its the indian not the arrow" question :)

Now generally the 9mm is slightly faster; wouldn't that translate into a straighter trajectory and more accuracy?

Regardless, I think we are splitting hairs here.

locosway
05-26-2012, 9:51 PM
Now generally the 9mm is slightly faster; wouldn't that translate into a straighter trajectory and more accuracy?

Regardless, I think we are splitting hairs here.

At what distance? And you have to account for mass too. The 9mm will lose energy much faster than a .45.

Generally, it's all negligible for handguns. If we're shooting 100 yards for a competition, then that's a different story. I can take any caliber and make my shots count in a SD/HD scenario, and THAT is what matters to me.

chrisf
05-27-2012, 12:57 AM
Sigma? Yuck. That M&P is a much better designed piece (in any caliber) than that cheapo Sigma....
You must have never shot a sigma if you would say something like that. Yes the trigger is hard and long which I fixed in 20 minutes for free. But I personally like my sigma more than the m&p. Include the fact it was $200 cheaper and I love it that much more. But that's just my opinion. I've also never had a jam or anything with my sigma even through a dirt/sand torture rest. I have however have had 2 jams with my mp at the range clean and oiled.

JaeOne3345
05-27-2012, 3:06 AM
It doesn't matter if it is a 50 desert eagle or a 9mm Glock.

If your shot breaks with the sights on target with no disturbance to the gun/sights, the bullet is going to go where you aimed (considering it is mechanically dialed in).

Call your shots = accurate. Most handgun calibers are more than accurate enough at the distances they are used at.

People really need to stop confusing accuracy with caliber, handgun wise.

Follow up shots are different ordeal, but even with follow up shots, half of you guys talking about what you can and cannot shoot just simply haven't put enough rounds down range. You shoot a box of rounds and then all of a sudden cast or write some caliber off because you spent an entire 15 minutes with it. Whooptie-effin-do.

In matches, I shoot 9mm, 40, whatever. Once the buzzer goes off, none of that sh1t really matters. If you have solid fundamentals, a good grip, are able to track your sights, call your shots, etc, you will be fine. Spend more time with the gun, period

JaeOne3345
05-27-2012, 3:08 AM
9mm is lower recoil, higher muzzle velocity, and way cheaper to shoot. .40 costs almost as much as .45... I have owned a Sig P220, HK USP40, Glock 21....... I'm sticking with 9mm for the long haul.

Which is why you should really reload and all of that becomes a moot point.

CharlesV
05-27-2012, 3:46 AM
Buying a G19 was a humbling experience, i couldnt hit a barn door with it. Im slowly improving, learning what im doing wrong. Everything else i can shoot well enough but not this. Its depressing. My previous Ruger .357 was a cinch, so is my 870. So id say it doesnt matter, 9mm or .40, in the end its the shooter but some guns are easier to master. Id still choose 9mm despite the troubles.

USMC 82-86
05-27-2012, 6:19 AM
At what distance? And you have to account for mass too. The 9mm will lose energy much faster than a .45.

Generally, it's all negligible for handguns. If we're shooting 100 yards for a competition, then that's a different story. I can take any caliber and make my shots count in a SD/HD scenario, and THAT is what matters to me.

This^^^. That is what I care about making my shots count in a SD/HD situation.

Rorge Retson
05-27-2012, 6:35 AM
Which is why you should really reload and all of that becomes a moot point.

Agreed. Anyone who is serious and truly preparing for SHTF will be reloading.

FX-05 Xiuhcoatl
05-27-2012, 7:40 AM
I'm planning to get a full-sized pistol primarily as a range toy, but having a little more effective caliber is tempting for the rare times I'd carry it hiking or something. With cheaper ammo (say up to $0.40/round), is there any inherent difference in accuracy between the 9 mm and .40SW?

if this is your 1st handgun, I'll say get 9mm cheaper to shoot and that will give you more range time, or you can just buy m&p40 and change the barrel to 9mm that way you have a 9mm to practice and a .40 just "because"

BamBam-31
05-27-2012, 7:49 AM
I used to think the bullseye calibers were more accurate (just as a result of years of trial and error from those that have forgotten more than I'll ever know), but now I think those calibers are more a result of the rules of that game rather than any inherent accuracy benefit of certain calibers.

I will say, however, that .45acp is surprisingly easy to shoot accurately.

missiontrails
05-27-2012, 6:59 PM
You must have never shot a sigma if you would say something like that. Yes the trigger is hard and long which I fixed in 20 minutes for free. But I personally like my sigma more than the m&p. Include the fact it was $200 cheaper and I love it that much more. But that's just my opinion. I've also never had a jam or anything with my sigma even through a dirt/sand torture rest. I have however have had 2 jams with my mp at the range clean and oiled.

Are you kidding me? I owned one in 9mm 10 years ago. Seriously, the ONLY reason to buy a Signa over a M&P (because that was the comparison) is the lower price point. Can you think of a clear reason to buy one other than price? For that price you can have a FNP, a Sig Pro etc.....

missiontrails
05-27-2012, 7:02 PM
Which is why you should really reload and all of that becomes a moot point.

Not all, I can do more precision work under duress with a 9mm. Yes, that is all 6'4" 220 of me... lol

CBruce
05-28-2012, 11:43 AM
I've shot a few hundred rounds through many different types of guns in the 3popular handgun calibres and I've just never felt comfortable with .40 S&W. It's often described as 'snappy' and in my case that means a lot of flinching and anticipation which makes it very hard to be accurate.

So really, your accuracy is going to have much more to do with your shooting techniques, how well you handle the power and recoil of the round, and even the gun itself rather than the bullet.

People can (and have) argued endlessely about 'stopping power' or other effectiveness of the different calibres, but bottom line...paper targets don't care about stopping power and 9mm is much more economical round to practice with than .40 S&W.

Go to the range, rent a couple of pistols in each calibre, and decide which one you like best.

CBruce
05-28-2012, 11:46 AM
Which is why you should really reload and all of that becomes a moot point.

Are you suggesting it's cheaper to reload .40 S&W than 9mm, or are you merely pointing out that reloading your own ammo is cheaper than buying factory loads?

bandook
05-28-2012, 12:49 PM
Honestly between my sigma .40 and m&p 9mm. I can shoot left handed more accurate with the .40 than I can while trying to aim with the 9mm. Dont know why but I love the .40.

I too am more accurate with my left hand. Slower, but far more accurate.
Probably a mix if a more deliberate trigger pull and better support from my right hand.

OP, for pure range fun, get a 40 that has a readily available 9mm conversion. E.g for a Glock, a .40 is really a 3-in-1 allowing you to shoot 357 sig with a barrel change an 9mm with a conversion kit.

mixicus
05-28-2012, 4:49 PM
I shoot 1,000's of rounds through both a Glock 17 and a Glock 22 every year (stock, full size 9mm and .40S&W respectively). With the exception of the diameter of the barrel, they are the same pistol. I see no appreciable difference in precision (size of groups) between the 2 pistols. This includes shooting them from supported positions at 50 yards.

I would suggest trying a variety of pistols in both calibers to see which pistol YOU shoot better. For defensive purposes, if you select modern quality hollow point ammo (Federal HST, Speer Gold Dot, Winchester Ranger STX,..etc), you'll be fine wiht either caliber. From a cost perspective, 9mm is cheaper to shoot than .40S&W (comparing like-to-like) if you don't reload.

ramathorn
05-28-2012, 6:23 PM
If you aren't going to practice often then get the 9mm... its cheaper and has less recoil. BUT if you do plan on spending time at the range working on your technique then you should be able to shoot any round competently, whether its a 9mm, .40 or even a .45.

orangeusa
05-28-2012, 6:36 PM
Read ANY handgun magazine. The groupings for a bench-mounted handgun are almost the same for all 9mm/.40/.45 cal guns.

That said, recoil is (to me and many others) similiar between 9mm and .45.

Bottom line
1. Ammo caliber is in the noise wrt accuracy/consistancy of groups.
2. Most guns are MUCH more accurate than their owners.

Kinda like saying - if you buy a given golf club - you'll do better. Doesn't work that way does it... :) Otherwise the golf pros would all use the same mfg....

.

SGTKane
05-28-2012, 7:10 PM
I have a Glock 23, which is .40. I also have a drop in 9mm conversion barrel from Lone Wolf.

I shoot better with it in the 9mm configuration. But I still shoot well enough in the .40 config that its my primary cc pistol. So take it for what its worth.

missiontrails
05-29-2012, 6:28 AM
Read ANY handgun magazine. The groupings for a bench-mounted handgun are almost the same for all 9mm/.40/.45 cal guns.

That said, recoil is (to me and many others) similiar between 9mm and .45.

Bottom line
1. Ammo caliber is in the noise wrt accuracy/consistancy of groups.
2. Most guns are MUCH more accurate than their owners.

Kinda like saying - if you buy a given golf club - you'll do better. Doesn't work that way does it... :) Otherwise the golf pros would all use the same mfg....

.
Yes, but those guns are sitting in a Ransom rest with brackets specifically made for the model of gun. Caliber usually does not matter on the first shot while the gun is in hand, but quick follow up shots or double taps will be more accurate for the average weekend shooter with a 9mm. If you're worried about stopping power, buy a 20 round box or Corbon or another "nasty round".... those 9mm rounds are loaded hot if you buy +P, and will expand to the diameter of a nickel upon impact.

dadoody
05-29-2012, 6:53 AM
I'm planning to get a full-sized pistol primarily as a range toy, but having a little more effective caliber is tempting for the rare times I'd carry it hiking or something. With cheaper ammo (say up to $0.40/round), is there any inherent difference in accuracy between the 9 mm and .40SW?

Yeah. Depends on who's shooting lawlz

JaeOne3345
05-29-2012, 7:22 AM
Yes, but those guns are sitting in a Ransom rest with brackets specifically made for the model of gun. Caliber usually does not matter on the first shot while the gun is in hand, but quick follow up shots or double taps will be more accurate for the average weekend shooter with a 9mm. If you're worried about stopping power, buy a 20 round box or Corbon or another "nasty round".... those 9mm rounds are loaded hot if you buy +P, and will expand to the diameter of a nickel upon impact.

Define double tap?

Your consecutive shots should be as well aimed as the first. Call your shots. The sights should be aligned when the shot breaks, on the first shot, second shot, etc.

If all you are doing is just haphazardly pulling the trigger on every consecutive shot, then yea, your second shots are not going to go where intended.

missiontrails
05-29-2012, 8:04 AM
Define double tap?

Your consecutive shots should be as well aimed as the first. Call your shots. The sights should be aligned when the shot breaks, on the first shot, second shot, etc.

If all you are doing is just haphazardly pulling the trigger on every consecutive shot, then yea, your second shots are not going to go where intended.

Haphazardly pulling the trigger? I think you may have read wrong.

JaeOne3345
05-29-2012, 8:31 AM
I fail to see how someone would be more or less accurate with a 40 caliber with their consecutive follow up shots if they are calling their shots.

On the first shot, you pull the trigger when you know the sight is aligned properly on target (calling shots).

On the second consecutive shot, you would do the same exact thing. You call the shot, you don't break the shot until the gun settled from the first shot, you made sure the sights are aligned, and then break the second shot.

Someone may need some practice on their grip technique when going from 9 to 40, but accuracy? As long as you break the shot with the sights aligned, the bullet will go where you aimed it, whether that be 40 or 9. The caliber will have an affect on recoil control and how long it takes for the gun to settle back down, but regardless, you don't break the shot until the sights are aligned. Doesn't matter if its a 9mm or a 50, if the shot is broken with the sights aligned properly, it is going to hit where you aim. Will the 50 cal take a bit more work to master in terms of grip/recoil/settling back down? Yea, but accuracy? Eh. Should not matter.

This is why I ask what your definition of a double tap is.

missiontrails
05-29-2012, 8:39 AM
I fail to see how someone would be more or less accurate with a 40 caliber with their consecutive follow up shots if they are calling their shots.

On the first shot, you pull the trigger when you know the sight is aligned properly on target (calling shots).

On the second consecutive shot, you would do the same exact thing. You call the shot, you don't break the shot until the gun settled from the first shot, you made sure the sights are aligned, and then break the second shot.

Someone may need some practice on their grip technique when going from 9 to 40, but accuracy? As long as you break the shot with the sights aligned, the bullet will go where you aimed it, whether that be 40 or 9. The caliber will have an affect on recoil control and how long it takes for the gun to settle back down, but regardless, you don't break the shot until the sights are aligned. Doesn't matter if its a 9mm or a 50, if the shot is broken with the sights aligned properly, it is going to hit where you aim. Will the 50 cal take a bit more work to master in terms of grip/recoil/settling back down? Yea, but accuracy? Eh. Should not matter.

This is why I ask what your definition of a double tap is.

Simple answer: Greater recoil "snap" will keep the average untrained shooter "off target" for a longer period of time. No need to debate this. We are not talking about proficient LEO or competitive shooters.

mif_slim
05-29-2012, 8:43 AM
Do I really have to show this again?

AMJLgYkpFHk&feature=plcp

JaeOne3345
05-29-2012, 9:02 AM
Simple answer: Greater recoil "snap" will keep the average untrained shooter "off target" for a longer period of time. No need to debate this. We are not talking about proficient LEO or competitive shooters.

That shooter should not take the shot again until the gun is back on target, period. 1 second, 5 minutes, etc. Don't break another shot unless the gun is on target, sights aligned, etc.

I think I already said that the caliber difference will have an affect on how long the gun takes to settle. No one is arguing that.

But if the shooter is pulling another shot off before the gun has settled, and sights are aligned, that has everything to do with bad technique and nothing to do with accuracy. Bad technique aka "untrained" as you put it. That person should put some time into shooting instead of choosing a caliber with no real basis.

If I shoot two consecutive shots at a USPSA target and the first bullet hits the A zone, and the second bullet hits the D zone, that says I did not aim my second shot like I did the first shot. Of course you will won't be accurate if you aren't aiming.

My point is that the first and second shot should not differ in accuracy if the person is waiting until the first shot settled, aligned the sights, and breaks the second one. If you aim on the second shot properly, it will go where intended.

Like I said, caliber will have affect on the shooter's ability to get the gun to settle back down quickly, but if they are taking a wild *** second shot without aiming, that is their fault. I see this all the time with new shooters. They fall into the belief that a "double tap" is just blindly pulling the trigger twice as fast as possible. That doesn't mean a damn thing if you can't see each shot break.

Lead Waster
05-29-2012, 11:08 AM
^^ I agree here. If you took a single shot out of each caliber gun, and you have the basics/fundamentals correct, then that single shot should hit the target the same for each caliber (depending on your own accuracy, not the guns).

I think by the time you even feel the recoil, the bullet is already out of the gun.

Another thing with "felt recoil" is that _I_ believe that a large component of it is LOUDNESS OF SHOT. Seriously, sure there is Newton's law, etc, etc, whatever, but I think people tend to flinch follow up shots due to the anticipation of the sound. This is assuming that you allow the sights to settle again before the next shot. I mean, if you fired a shot, then waited one minute to shoot the next, I believe the louder/sharper sounding guns/calibers will cause more flinch.

Try doubling up your ear pro, plugs and high NRR muffs. Just for kicks and see if it affects flinching or whatever.

I think I shoot better if I warm up with a .22 before going to 9 or .40, just because I get used to hearing a "bang!".

The first time I ever shot a handgun, my idiot friend handed me a snub nosed .357. The resulting noise and fireball from all the unburned powder leaving the barrel had me flinching for years. It was the blind leading the blind, he's not a shooter or a gun owner.

IPSICK
05-29-2012, 1:29 PM
If you have solid fundamentals, a good grip, are able to track your sights, call your shots, etc, you will be fine. Spend more time with the gun, period

This should have been the end of the thread. Honestly when it comes to handgun calibers and shooting distances, the ballistics of the bullet are a secondary concern compared to the shooting fundamentals when shooting accurately.

JaeOne3345
05-29-2012, 1:57 PM
Thank you, guys above.

I am glad somebody actually understands.

I think by the time you even feel the recoil, the bullet is already out of the gun.

Exactly. As long as you pulled the trigger without creating any movement of the gun/sights, it is going where you pointed it.

Rorge Retson
05-29-2012, 8:06 PM
Just one data point. Today at the range I shot my CZ 75 SP-01 9mm, and my XD-40 4" Service. That is a full steel 9mm pistol vs. a polymer .40 S&W weapon. I would think that if there were going to be an extreme case in this debate, this would be it.

My experience was that there was no difference in accuracy.

The .40 was a little 'snappier,' but surprisingly, that did not affect me in acquiring the target for a second shot. If you had told me this before I went to the range today, I would have said you were crazy, and argued vehemently against it.

If you told me I had to quantify the difference between the two, I could not. I would say that there was a qualitative difference - the two weapons were different to shoot, but not in a way that affected their (or my) ability to be accurate.

ThiZZ
05-30-2012, 11:11 AM
whatever you are more accurate with is all that matters

JaeOne3345
05-30-2012, 11:45 AM
lol..

IPSICK
05-30-2012, 12:20 PM
Jae,

You've got it all wrong. The bigger caliber will always be more accurate because the larger diameter bullet has a better chance of getting me an "A" hit as opposed to a "B" or "C" when I get close to the scoring perforation on the target. Therefore, .50GI, .50AE, and .500S&W are the superior calibers. You wusses shooting those 9mm bullets need not apply.

;)

tal3nt
05-30-2012, 12:37 PM
Unless your barrel is an "S" shape it's gon' shoot straighT

ejhc11
05-30-2012, 12:42 PM
It depends on the gun and how it fits you not the caliber. I can shoot a Sig P220 much better than an HK USP because it fits me. I own a Glock 19 2nd Gen and learned how to shoot that gun very effectively.

TATER313
05-30-2012, 12:54 PM
I have glock 35 40s&w which felt recoil is comparable to my CZ75 9mm. like others said accuracy depends on shooter most of all, then all guns are not equal. If your worried about cost for bullets then reload I save at least $150 per thousand rounds

JaeOne3345
05-31-2012, 10:04 AM
Jae,

You've got it all wrong. The bigger caliber will always be more accurate because the larger diameter bullet has a better chance of getting me an "A" hit as opposed to a "B" or "C" when I get close to the scoring perforation on the target. Therefore, .50GI, .50AE, and .500S&W are the superior calibers. You wusses shooting those 9mm bullets need not apply.

;)

GAMER! :D

Lead Waster
05-31-2012, 10:09 AM
^^ LOL, bigger bullets also get you bigger scores when you miss the A anyway!

I've actually briefly considered getting a CZ-75b SA in .40 to shoot L-10, since I love my SA in 9mm, but it sucks in L-10 scoring minor.

But I've run out of gun money for the year.

JaeOne3345
05-31-2012, 10:24 AM
^^ LOL, bigger bullets also get you bigger scores when you miss the A anyway!

Only if the loads meet power major factor at the chrono!

IPSICK
05-31-2012, 11:25 AM
^^ LOL, bigger bullets also get you bigger scores when you miss the A anyway!

I've actually briefly considered getting a CZ-75b SA in .40 to shoot L-10, since I love my SA in 9mm, but it sucks in L-10 scoring minor.

But I've run out of gun money for the year.

Can't miss fast enough and can't miss big enough! Besides, who needs follow up shots when my bullets weigh twice as much as yours?

rdsii64
07-05-2012, 8:00 PM
Calibers are not accurate, CONSISTANT ammo assembled from quality components is. which one YOU SHOOT BETTER is a question only you can answer.

GuillermoAntonio
07-05-2012, 8:46 PM
I'm planning to get a full-sized pistol primarily as a range toy, but having a little more effective caliber is tempting for the rare times I'd carry it hiking or something. With cheaper ammo (say up to $0.40/round), is there any inherent difference in accuracy between the 9 mm and .40SW?

I may be wrong but to me it sounds like its the OP's first gun.
For a 1st gun I would suggest 9mm over .40
You will make it easier on yourself to learn how to shoot.
Less recoil and cheaper ammo will translate in more practice, if you add some classes, you will be on your way to a good start.

9mmrevolver
07-05-2012, 9:20 PM
If u reload and change out springs u can get any caliber down to an exceptible level for your own needs. Me personally I only really shoot 45. My friend has a 9 and 10mm in a 1911 platform. Love both. If I didn't reload I'd go with the 9 but would still want the 10. 40 really doesn't factor into any of my purchases. I hate it. If I'm gunna have a snappy gun it's gunna be in 10. That way I can down load it if I want to go on the lighter side but still have tons of knock down with full power. That sigma....... ...........sorry had to projectiles vomit. Shot one in a 40 and it hurt my finger to shoot it. The m&p I agree is better but just an upgraded sigma. I'd take a glock any day over the two and I'm not a glock fan.