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tastymarinade
05-23-2012, 12:57 PM
What is the difference between a shotgun that has a full (barrel) length magazine tube compared to one that is not full length?

AAShooter
05-23-2012, 1:05 PM
Usually capacity. Most hunting shotguns must be set up to hold no more than three rounds so magazines with higher capacity must be plugged. Many Home Defense shotgun are set up with longer magazines or magazines with magazine extensions to add capacity.

LBDamned
05-23-2012, 2:44 PM
^^^ +1... but it's so obvious, that I think maybe the OP means something other?...

alfred1222
05-23-2012, 2:55 PM
^^^ +1... but it's so obvious, that I think maybe the OP means something other?...

Maybe hes asking about the weight differences between having a full length tube mag and a plugged tube??

AAShooter
05-23-2012, 4:11 PM
Maybe hes asking about the weight differences between having a full length tube mag and a plugged tube??

Weight increases with longer magazine, especially when they are fully loaded. Further, the weight moves out towards the muzzle so the center of mass changes and swing dynamics change. Finally, the more rounds in the gun, the greater change in the gun handling characteristics is seen as rounds are depleted. I am not sure that addresses the question but took a pass at the question.

Obviously, the feel and swing of a gun is a very individual preference.

tastymarinade
05-23-2012, 8:49 PM
^^^ +1... but it's so obvious, that I think maybe the OP means something other?...

Yes. I apologize for not being more specific. I was not sure how to ask since doing an online search did not produce much information so I began with a general question.

Maybe hes asking about the weight differences between having a full length tube mag and a plugged tube??

Yes. I was trying to understand if the performance of the shotgun was affected by different mag tube lengths. I'm guessing the differences may be very small but still wanted to make sure.

Weight increases with longer magazine, especially when they are fully loaded. Further, the weight moves out towards the muzzle so the center of mass changes and swing dynamics change. Finally, the more rounds in the gun, the greater change in the gun handling characteristics is seen as rounds are depleted. I am not sure that addresses the question but took a pass at the question.

Obviously, the feel and swing of a gun is a very individual preference.

This information is what I was aiming to find. How and what dynamics would change with the more weight placed at the muzzle? My guess is that recoil/ muzzle flip may be less than when there is more weight toward the trigger, but what do I know? :p

As rounds are depleted, how would handling characteristics change?

AAShooter
05-24-2012, 9:13 AM
I will take a shot at it. Without a bunch of math and physics, the basics are that when the shell is fired, it will exert a force back on the gun equal to the force pushing the bullet out the barrel. The acceleration associated with the force is inversely proportional to the mass of the item. So a bullet will accelerate much faster than the heavier gun. The movement of the gun is the recoil felt.

As the gun gets heavier and heavier, the felt recoil drops. This is why many clays guns like trap guns tend to be very heavy. So recoil over hundreds of rounds daily is manageable. Of course, hunting that involves lots of walking with such a heavy gun is tiresome. So when you add and extended mag as well as extra rounds, the weight goes up and the felt recoil drops.

The second issue is that if the force of firing the gun is not on the same axis as where the gun is mounted, this will cause rotation, or muzzle flip. For most shotguns the barrel(s) are above the stock so when fired the muzzle of the gun will rise. The more offset, the more flip. This is why most people fire the lower barrel of an over and under first since it will have less muzzle flip. Obviously, the heavier the gun, the less muzzle flip. Further, as the weight is distributed closer and closer to the muzzle, you it will have greater impact on reducing muzzle flip. Since extended magazines and additional shells add weight to the front of the gun they will help muzzle flip. Many competitors have their guns ported to help with muzzle flip; however, there is a school of thought that thinks this is a bad idea for defensive shotguns since the muzzle flash through the porting will impact your vision if fired in darkness. I find this to be very ammo dependent.

In a similar way, the stock of many shotguns have cast-on or cast-off where the stock is pushed into or away from the shooters cheek. The more offset, the more rotation will occur. So in addition to the muzzle flipping upward, it will generally move horizontally as well. The same principles apply--additional weight will minimize this.

In all these situations as you fire the gun and the magazine is depleted, you will fell more recoil and get more muzzle flip.

All this ignores the shooter and the "balance" of the gun. A heavier gun is hard to get swinging, has more momentum, and is harder to stop. This gets even worse as the weight is moved to the front of the gun. So this will also change as the rounds are depleted.

One issue for many defensive shotguns is the shooter puts on an extended magazine with additional rounds making the gun heavy and "nose" heavy. They will often add a 4 or 6 round sidesaddle to the receiver, adding even more weight. Throw in a dedicated tactical light and you have a gun that many find exhausting to shoot. Many can not hold the gun at the low ready with one hand and perform administrative functions. Of course in a real defensive situation, is very different than 8 hours of shooting the gun.

It is easy to see many of these issue is firing a light polymer handgun with a high-capacity magazine. The gun behavior changes as the magazine is depleted.

I will throw in this link to give a sense of some of the nuances of gun fit: http://www.gunsamerica.com/blog/usamu-shotgun-team-home-fitting-your-shotgun-pitch/

The bottom line is the whole thing gets very involved and is highly dependent on the shooter and what bothers them.