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View Full Version : Open carry and voting - Indiana edition


kauaibuilt
05-12-2012, 12:25 AM
*Mods: if its in the wrong place please move... thanks!*
http://www.abc57.com/home/top-stories/Marine-openly-carrying-handgun-turned-away-from-poll-location-150721665.html?hpt=us_bn6

Short version:
Marine vet legally open carrying a Glock attempts to go and vote. Was stopped and police were called. After several hours he was given the State statute stating he couldn't carry at a polling place.

"After about an hour and a half; the officers, who had asked for assistance from the Election Board, were provided a state statute (35-47-2-1) and relayed it to Edinger, telling him that it kept him from being able to bring the gun inside."

Apparently the Vet was in the right and returned to the polling place. He refused to vote because they wouldnt recognize his right to carry his weapon into the polling area.

All but one of the responses were in support and the article was surprisingly supportive.

Ron-Solo
05-12-2012, 1:01 AM
There used to be a Federal Election Code section that prohibited firearms at polling places, but I'm not sure if it is still valid.

Many years ago, we were not allowed to vote on duty because of this section. I used to live in the area I worked. We would have to get a second unit to secure our firearm while on the premises of the polling place. It was enacted to prevent other intimidation, which used to be common in some places in the South.

Since I worked so far from home, I have voted absentee for over twenty years. Not an issue in my humble abode.

mrrsquared79
05-12-2012, 8:52 AM
There used to be a Federal Election Code section that prohibited firearms at polling places, but I'm not sure if it is still valid.

Many years ago, we were not allowed to vote on duty because of this section. I used to live in the area I worked. We would have to get a second unit to secure our firearm while on the premises of the polling place. It was enacted to prevent other intimidation, which used to be common in some places in the South.

Since I worked so far from home, I have voted absentee for over twenty years. Not an issue in my humble abode.

So that's why my father always voted via absentee ballot having the same employer as you Ron!!! I never thought to ask him why though...

QQQ
05-12-2012, 3:40 PM
I have mixed feelings about this. Bringing a gun into the polling place has a bad precedent in our country's historical context.

Your rights stop where mine start. I have a God-given right to vote without being intimidated in any form by armed men. And openly displaying a firearm at your neighborhood polling station on election day is inching awfully close to that line.

But yeah, absentee ballots are da bomb. I always vote absentee.

Scarecrow Repair
05-13-2012, 6:29 AM
I have mixed feelings about this. Bringing a gun into the polling place has a bad precedent in our country's historical context.

Your rights stop where mine start. I have a God-given right to vote without being intimidated in any form by armed men. And openly displaying a firearm at your neighborhood polling station on election day is inching awfully close to that line.

But yeah, absentee ballots are da bomb. I always vote absentee.

How the heck is legal open carry intimidating in a polling station and not anywhere else, say 100 yards away?

Fyathyrio
05-14-2012, 12:28 AM
Hmmm, he should get Eric H0lder to represent him in the civil rights trial, we know H0lder approves of guns in polling places, just ask the Philly Black Panthers H0lder refuses to investigate or prosecute.

http://www.esquire.com/cm/esquire/images/dC/black20panthers20philadelphia.jpg

Ron-Solo
05-14-2012, 1:55 AM
How the heck is legal open carry intimidating in a polling station and not anywhere else, say 100 yards away?

Hmmm.......let me see. Picture a dozen men wearing white sheets and toting shotguns hanging around a polling place in Mississippi. Intimidating, only if you are any color other than white.

Just sayin......

Mulay El Raisuli
05-14-2012, 6:33 AM
How the heck is legal open carry intimidating in a polling station and not anywhere else, say 100 yards away?


Real good question.


The Raisuli

Scarecrow Repair
05-14-2012, 7:54 AM
Hmmm.......let me see. Picture a dozen men wearing white sheets and toting shotguns hanging around a polling place in Mississippi. Intimidating, only if you are any color other than white.

Just sayin......

It would be just as intimidating without the guns and polling place.

socal2310
05-14-2012, 8:06 AM
I have mixed feelings about this. Bringing a gun into the polling place has a bad precedent in our country's historical context.

Your rights stop where mine start. I have a God-given right to vote without being intimidated in any form by armed men. And openly displaying a firearm at your neighborhood polling station on election day is inching awfully close to that line.

But yeah, absentee ballots are da bomb. I always vote absentee.

I disagree, seeing armed people of a specific ethnic group patrolling outside of a polling place is clearly intimidating even without other accoutrements (white men wearing white robes or black men with leather jackets and berets) but one armed person with a gun on their hip walking in isn't. Remember, secret ballots? Voter intimidation is aimed at preventing certain people from voting at all, an armed person in casual clothing doesn't accomplish that very well.

Ryan

NotEnufGarage
05-14-2012, 8:11 AM
I have mixed feelings about this. Bringing a gun into the polling place has a bad precedent in our country's historical context.

Your rights stop where mine start. I have a God-given right to vote without being intimidated in any form by armed men. And openly displaying a firearm at your neighborhood polling station on election day is inching awfully close to that line.

But yeah, absentee ballots are da bomb. I always vote absentee.

Troll for Brady much?

Absentee ballots should be eliminated in all but very specific circumstances. They were originally created for those who had to be away from home at the time of the election. They now are used primarily by those too lazy to make a short trip and stand in line, and they create a hazard of voter fraud.

My feelings are, if you can't take the 15 minutes it takes to vote in person, you really don't care enough about your vote for it to count.

Liberty1
05-14-2012, 10:47 AM
Gun free zones work! :rolleyes: If no code applies in Indiana I hope Alan G. takes those officers to the cleaners for telling the voter he can't vote with his side arm.

Tempus
05-14-2012, 10:49 AM
My feelings are, if you can't take the 15 minutes it takes to vote in person, you really don't care enough about your vote for it to count.

And some of us work and have 1-2 hr commutes. I don't know you or your situation so please stop deciding the rest of us have to vote on your rules.

Heck, I think anyone that isn't busy enough at work needs to stop voting and get a second job.

QQQ
05-14-2012, 10:50 AM
Troll for Brady much?

Absentee ballots should be eliminated in all but very specific circumstances. They were originally created for those who had to be away from home at the time of the election. They now are used primarily by those too lazy to make a short trip and stand in line, and they create a hazard of voter fraud.

My feelings are, if you can't take the 15 minutes it takes to vote in person, you really don't care enough about your vote for it to count.Sorry, I didn't realize that being living on a non-permanent basis in a county other than the one in which I have established residence meant that I was lazy. I guess I'll stop voting now because I don't meet the standard that you "feel" I should.I disagree, seeing armed people of a specific ethnic group patrolling outside of a polling place is clearly intimidating even without other accoutrements (white men wearing white robes or black men with leather jackets and berets) but one armed person with a gun on their hip walking in isn't. Remember, secret ballots? Voter intimidation is aimed at preventing certain people from voting at all, an armed person in casual clothing doesn't accomplish that very well.

RyanFair point. Where do we draw the line, though? What if a second armed person "happens" to be voting the at same time as the first?

speedrrracer
05-14-2012, 10:55 AM
Troll for Brady much?

Absentee ballots should be eliminated in all but very specific circumstances. They were originally created for those who had to be away from home at the time of the election. They now are used primarily by those too lazy to make a short trip and stand in line, and they create a hazard of voter fraud.

My feelings are, if you can't take the 15 minutes it takes to vote in person, you really don't care enough about your vote for it to count.

My feelings are, if you think I don't care just because I'm smart enough to vote absentee, you don't know what you're talking about.

And if you think absentee ballots create a hazard of voter fraud, try using a voting machine running Diebold hardware & software. Oh wait...

Wrangler John
05-15-2012, 1:57 AM
Well now, my first election was in 1966. I had just turned 21 in May (the age of majority required to vote then). The primary election was held on June 7, and I was working for two weeks at the Sacramento State Fair for the Spring Fair National Horse Show. My residences were in Redwood City and Woodside. I voted absentee in the Republican primary for Ronald Reagan. Come the general election on November 8, I was spending two weeks at the Cow Palace at the Horse Show and Rodeo, I had the pleasure of voting absentee for Ronald Reagan again. Reagan defeated incumbent Governor Edmund G. Brown by 57.65% to 42.35% of the vote. Brown carried only Alameda, San Francisco and Plumas Counties, indeed California was different then.

I never missed an election since that first primary, not once in 46 years. The absentee ballot, which required a visit to the County Courthouse to vote, served me well through those years.

However, we no longer have a strictly absentee ballot, we now may chose to vote by mail. In the ensuing years, after marriage and a move, I voted at the polling place like everyone else. Then the law was changed to allow permanent vote by mail status. Because my new job required me to be on-call 24-7, and I didn't want to miss an election, I chose that option. So, please do not demean those of us who take voting seriously yet prefer the convenience and certainty of vote by mail.

scarville
05-15-2012, 4:50 AM
Considering the number of dead people who vote in certain places, carrying a firearm is reasonable and prudent.

http://southdakotapolitics.blogs.com/south_dakota_politics/images/2008/07/24/zombievoters.jpg

rugershooter
05-15-2012, 9:42 AM
If one armed man going about his own business is intimidating to other people, it's their fault not his. He was approached by the election officials because they thought he couldn't have a gun in a a polling place. They called the police. The police detained him for almost two hours and couldn't find a reason to prevent him from having a gun there. This is a good example of the anti freedom and freedom ignorant attitude we have in this country now; "It can't be legal to have a gun while you vote, something needs to be done about that!". These people need some jail time; they prevented him from exercising one right simply because he was exercising another right at the same time.