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View Full Version : Flash light, or Mounted flash light and or laser sight for HD?


em9sredbeam
05-01-2012, 11:45 AM
I always came from the philosophy of I would rather wait for an intruder in the dark in the corner for a shot with nightsites, than walk around with a flash light and a laser giving me away, but what are everybody elses opinions? I understand that there are some situations where you need light, So I am looking around at what to get. I don't want to spend $200 on a flashlight, but for a mounted light and laser for fun I might, but I am wondering if it is a waste of money.. Or is it worth it so you can use both hands for a grip on the gun? If I wanted a good, somewhat compact tactical light what is worth looking into that is good quality, but not rediculous in the price range?

As an added note I Don't believe in shooting at a target that I can't identify, but if the door gets kicked in or something crashes through my window I would rather be harder to see rather than easier to see.

Lead Waster
05-01-2012, 11:55 AM
I'm also considering getting a flashlight for one gun to use as HD.

Remember you shouldn't be shooting things you can't identify, and hiding in the dark might end up with a dead family member sneaking in after a night of drinking. At least have a good bright flashlight with a wide beam....if it's a bad guy, they will be blinded, if it's a family member, you've caught them red handed sneaking in.

Always have two flashlights if one is mounted on the gun otherwise you might be pointing a loaded gun at your kid.

I have no idea why the weapon lights are soooo expensive, but it might be good to just pony up and get a good one.

44fred
05-01-2012, 12:24 PM
You're right on that thought.

If I had family members sneaking into the house after getting drunk, I'd much rather handle that another way. Opening up a can of whoop ***** the next morning is much more appropriate.

On the other hand, nobody has access to my home besides my wife and myself.

This is always a topic that never seems to be resolved. Half the battle is knowing you are about to use deadly force. If you give a darn you'll probably do the right thing. Experts would agree to identify before shooting!

TheFlash
05-01-2012, 12:31 PM
I just keep a VERY BRIGHT flashlight in the nightstand drawer. Turning the light on for only a few second interval and repeating that action while going through the house and having my pistol in the other hand works for me.
I have two young kids and want to be 100% certain to positively identify any noise before covering ANYTHING with the muzzle of my pistol...

Just my two cents...

timmyb21
05-01-2012, 12:41 PM
Surefire G2 with a lanyard, used for clearing the house, M&P 9 with a TLR-1 on it for when the house isn't clear. light in one hand, gun in the other, if trouble arises, I simply let go of the light (remember it's on a wrist lanyard, it doesn't even hit the floor) and switch to a two hand grip on my light equipped pistol. If I need that second hand, it's still able to be freed up for use.

G-Solutions
05-01-2012, 1:03 PM
I used to have a gun-mounted light (surefire nitrolon with frontstrap remote switch on a 1911) and discovered that I did not actually need it. There's always sufficient ambient light to see what's going on in the house. When I replaced the 1911 with an XD as nightstand gun, I did not add another light to the new pistol. Instead, I have a handheld surefire - that's it.

If I ever were to put a light back on a gun, it would be another one with a remote switch under the trigger guard. This is the only way that one can run light and gun with a single hand, even under elevated stress levels. I had an Insight M6 under an HK USP and could not find a reliable way to work that rocker switch single handed. The remote switch for that one is pretty useless - it can't be mounted so that one can reliably operate it with either hand.
If I have to tie both hands up, I might as well add the flexibility of a handheld light that allows illuminating areas that you do not necessarily want to point a gun at (such as areas where a family member might be, that needs help).
The only point that is easier with a weapon-mounted light is reloading - but once you get the procedure down to clamp the light under your arm or drop it in your go-bag that one becomes rather easy as well.

Edited to add - when you select your light output, keep in mind that your eyes adapt to the darkness too. Even "only" 100 lumens bouncing off a white wall when your eyes are used to the dark will kill your night vision in a flash... pun intended.

IVth Horseman
05-01-2012, 1:06 PM
Streamlight TLR's have a great reputation for affordable quality weaponlights. That said, this topic has been discussed many times before, just use the search function.

Lugiahua
05-01-2012, 1:08 PM
all my HD weapons have lights mounted, and I also carry a Surefire G2 24/7.
weapon light on handgun also reduced recoil by adding weight to the barrel.

only problem with weapon light is that makes you harder to find a proper holster, especially for less common/new weapons.
(Raven makes holster for most handgun, but you have to wait for three months..)

Arkangel
05-01-2012, 1:22 PM
I vote gun mounted... One less thing to grab when things go bump in the night.

Also the wifey always seems to grab my surefire's that I have throughout the house, then forgets where she leaves them. She does however leave the weapon mounted ones alone.

NeenachGuy
05-01-2012, 1:23 PM
I prefer a handheld flashlight, for a couple of reasons, but primarily:

If your flashlight is mounted on the weapon, you can't illuminate the room without pointing your weapon at someone who may not be a threat. I think this may create a potentially dangerous situation and/or open yourself up to liabilities.

Also, weapon-mounted flashlights tend to be expensive ($200 - $300), and it is difficult for me to justify the additional expense, when I can just have a $80 80-lumen light that will be more flexible and work just as good or better.

Dhena81
05-01-2012, 1:36 PM
Like many posters I have both there are strengths to having both options.

6ynmOFCAGlQ

nocomply25
05-01-2012, 1:49 PM
I think no matter what you need a light. I would feel like complete **** if i shot a guy because i could not see correctly. I think i would much rather have one on the gun so that my other hand is free...I do not have a problem pointing the gun around, as my hand would not be on trigger anyway. Also i took some notes from another calgun member who told there kids to stay in the rooms when dad is out investigating a noise. He comes and clears there rooms and they stay in the bed...that way no pointing your gun at the kids. Its good to go over drills with the family so that you do not accidently shoot anyone. Also if you have older kids they are less likely to sneak out if the know that dad clears the house when he hears noises! haha!

Montu
05-01-2012, 2:00 PM
I got the TLR1s and love it...you can keep both hands on the gun and with the light pointing downward at the ground it will still light up a room allowing you to get a positive ID. Also its pretty easy to switch the light on/off or use the momentary on feature

in my mind it just seems easier then having to hold the gun + light or even gun+light+phone

Army
05-01-2012, 2:50 PM
If it's so dark you need illuminated sights just to see them...it's far too dark to see any threat to aim at.

Get into your corner with your gun, high lumen light, cell/telephone, and be talking to the 911 operator.

If you have kids, get to their room and hunker down.

Your scary bump in the dark dark night.... just may be your wife/girlfriend/dog/cat/etc.

tbhracing
05-01-2012, 2:53 PM
Tagged

itisagoodname
05-01-2012, 2:53 PM
I keep a 340 Lumen light on my Mossberg and i have a Streamlight on my Beretta. I dont HAVE TO use it but its there if i need it.

tacticalcity
05-01-2012, 2:53 PM
Like many posters I have both there are strengths to having both options.

6ynmOFCAGlQ

I agree, strengths and weeknesses with both. Depends on what you are using the gun for, the exact scenerio, and the other equipment you have. Yeagers comments on the negatives over going too bright with a light are on target. Self blinding is a real issue inside the home. Those white walls, mirrors and framed pictures kick back a lot of light. Thankfully, most standard lights are not too bright. Definately need to practice with them with the lights out after your eyes have adjusted to the darkness fully. You will be surprise how bright a light is under those circumstances compared to with the house lights on or when your eyes are adjusted to daylight.

whipkiller
05-01-2012, 3:21 PM
I got the TLR1s and love it...you can keep both hands on the gun and with the light pointing downward at the ground it will still light up a room allowing you to get a positive ID. Also its pretty easy to switch the light on/off or use the momentary on feature

in my mind it just seems easier then having to hold the gun + light or even gun+light+phone

^^^This, although I do keep a Streamlight Handheld next to the bed too.

tbc
05-01-2012, 3:49 PM
I always came from the philosophy of I would rather wait for an intruder in the dark in the corner for a shot with nightsites, than walk around with a flash light and a laser giving me away, but what are everybody elses opinions? I understand that there are some situations where you need light, So I am looking around at what to get. I don't want to spend $200 on a flashlight, but for a mounted light and laser for fun I might, but I am wondering if it is a waste of money.. Or is it worth it so you can use both hands for a grip on the gun? If I wanted a good, somewhat compact tactical light what is worth looking into that is good quality, but not rediculous in the price range?

As an added note I Don't believe in shooting at a target that I can't identify, but if the door gets kicked in or something crashes through my window I would rather be harder to see rather than easier to see.

You may need it to save your life and/or the innocent ones. Get the best (reliable) one.


Sent from IPhone

stix213
05-01-2012, 3:59 PM
Got to identify your target. For all you know someone trying to get your door open is your drunk sister wanting to complain to you about how her boyfriend just dumped her at 2am.

I keep a TLR-1 on the nightstand pistol. You can choose to use it or not if the moment comes. Having it on your gun doesn't mean you have to use it.

calif 15-22
05-01-2012, 4:10 PM
Streamlight TLR's have a great reputation for affordable quality weaponlights. That said, this topic has been discussed many times before, just use the search function.

Every conseavable topic about handguns has already been discussed. Bringing it up again to get other info can't hurt.


If your flashlight is mounted on the weapon, you can't illuminate the room without pointing your weapon at someone who may not be a threat. I think this may create a potentially dangerous situation and/or open yourself up to liabilities.

I agree having the light seperate is helpful and gives you options


If it's so dark you need illuminated sights just to see them...it's far too dark to see any threat to aim at.

Get into your corner with your gun, high lumen light, cell/telephone, and be talking to the 911 operator.

If you have kids, get to their room and hunker down.

Your scary bump in the dark dark night.... just may be your wife/girlfriend/dog/cat/etc.

And the winner is this one by Army. Army has it right. For most of us Non-LE or Non Combat Trained (playing HALO does not make you combat trained) civilians who do not deal with this type of threat everyday, we are really kidding ourselves if we think we will be on the offensive when this happens. Multiple armed intruders, I'm on 911 door locked, flashlight on door, and 9mm pointed at door until operator tells me "The officers have cleared the house and you are safe". At that point I unload the gun, put it on the floor, and open the door to my new best friends in Blue. Anything else is just Macho Mall Ninja Bull. (In my opinion of course)

nocomply25
05-01-2012, 4:29 PM
And the winner is this one by Army. Army has it right. For most of us Non-LE or Non Combat Trained (playing HALO does not make you combat trained) civilians who do not deal with this type of threat everyday, we are really kidding ourselves if we think we will be on the offensive when this happens. Multiple armed intruders, I'm on 911 door locked, flashlight on door, and 9mm pointed at door until operator tells me "The officers have cleared the house and you are safe". At that point I unload the gun, put it on the floor, and open the door to my new best friends in Blue. Anything else is just Macho Mall Ninja Bull. (In my opinion of course)[/QUOTE]

I dont agree with this 100 percent. Even though i understand if there are multiple intruders you will want to find a safe place with the family and hunker down but that is assuming you have the time to do so. I believe that some people would **** themselves but i know other people will use the weapon and defend themselves. You do not have to be a leo or marine to shoot a person trying to hurt you. For example i recently saw a 911 call where a 70+ year old lady had to shoot a guy coming through her window...even worse is that she had just purchased the gun the day before. I think when the time comes everyone will make the decision to act or not...some people do not live in a neighborhood where the cops will be there fast enough to save your ***. So good luck if your counting on them.

CAglock20c
05-01-2012, 6:34 PM
you can find streamlight tlr-1's new for a little over $100 all day long...Tlr-2s go for about $225-$250 new

9mmepiphany
05-01-2012, 8:07 PM
It completely depends on your defensive plan.

If you are going to stay in one place and wait for the BG to come to you...hopefully along a single route...the Weapon Mounted Light (WML) makes more sense. The WML lets you light up an obvious threat...coming at you...and allows two hands on the gun.

If you are going to move around the house at all, you should get a handheld light first. You should never search you own house with a WML, unless you really like pointing guns at unidentified targets

drunktank
05-01-2012, 8:54 PM
I like all the above plus night sights. Here's why -

Night sights (for obvious reasons at night)

Laser to help at night but in reality I like to dry fire and the dot helps give me feedback of trigger control

Weapon mounted light - when I camp at night and have to dispatch a 4 legged critter I like to keep both hands on firearm. My lights throw a wide enough beam to keep it gun pointed relatively away from target but still light it up indoors.

Handheld light - doubles as a baton and I can point the light without sweeping my muzzle.

Dhena81
05-01-2012, 9:46 PM
I agree, strengths and weeknesses with both. Depends on what you are using the gun for, the exact scenerio, and the other equipment you have. Yeagers comments on the negatives over going too bright with a light are on target. Self blinding is a real issue inside the home. Those white walls, mirrors and framed pictures kick back a lot of light. Thankfully, most standard lights are not too bright. Definately need to practice with them with the lights out after your eyes have adjusted to the darkness fully. You will be surprise how bright a light is under those circumstances compared to with the house lights on or when your eyes are adjusted to daylight.

Ya I agree with almost everything he says no matter what kind of shirt he wears lol. A lot of people get caught up in getting the highest lumen light and not what the lights POU is for example close quarters like your home or extended ranges. People also forget the first thing your light should be doing IMO is identifying one of the reasons I don't care for strobes. My view may change though since I'm taking a surefire low light class on 5/12 and its my first low light class and I go with an open mind.

thaiphob25
05-01-2012, 10:07 PM
I have a Safariland: Rapid Light System with a coast 103 lumen 5 LED torch on my Ruger SR9c. lights up the entire room well and im able to identify what is in front of me.

fullrearview
05-01-2012, 11:18 PM
I prefer a handheld flashlight, for a couple of reasons, but primarily:

If your flashlight is mounted on the weapon, you can't illuminate the room without pointing your weapon at someone who may not be a threat. I think this may create a potentially dangerous situation and/or open yourself up to liabilities.

I saw this thread and the first thing that popped into my mind was this comment. Not you specifically, but an old train of thought. As one posted above, he has enough ambient light in the house to Identify a threat (Posted by G-Solutions... "There's always sufficient ambient light to see what's going on in the house.")... True... When the power is on. He forgot the power goes out, but crime doesn't stop because of it. Sometimes crime causes it.

Back to my point... I don't need to point my weapon at a threat/person/dog/kid/spouse to identify it. I have a TLR3 on my XDM9 3.8 and it lights up the whole room while pointing at the ground, ceiling, what have you. My weapon might be out at the low ready, but its not up unless I identify a clear threat. Even outdoors, it is bright enough to do the same thing.


Also, weapon-mounted flashlights tend to be expensive ($200 - $300), and it is difficult for me to justify the additional expense, when I can just have a $80 80-lumen light that will be more flexible and work just as good or better.

My TLR3 was bought for $65. It's a high quality piece, and is very durable. The guys I work with call me Schelprock, because I break things. It's because I run my gear hard, as I want to know it's limitations.

Another thing to think about... How do you manipulate things when both hands are being used? I have small children. I may need to grab them while retreating to safety and use deadly force at the same time. Can't really do that when both hands are full.

This is not pointed towards you (or meant to be negative, hopefully informative), but 99% of shooters do not think about a shooting or prepare for what a shooting really is. It's dynamic and constantly changing. You may go from shooting a perp, to performing CPR on a family member, all in the same moment, while maintaining a visual on the downed perp. Or the perp may have surrendered... You may have been shot in your weak hand that holds your non mounted light (getting shot in the hand is quite common in gunfights). You never know what will happen, but not having a mounted light has far more disadvantages than having one.

In fact, the only two which you posted (Cost and having to point it at someone) are not really a problem at all when you really think about it. The problem comes with changing your training and thinking differently.

Now, I will throw one more wrench into the ring...:p New technology is always coming out. Check this out. Best of both worlds, if you still can't commit to training with a fixed WML.

v4f52M422Y4

I would have no problems buying the mount only and putting a costco LED light on it.

Either way, stay safe people and always look for the new tech out there.

fullrearview
05-01-2012, 11:20 PM
I have a Safariland: Rapid Light System with a coast 103 lumen 5 LED torch on my Ruger SR9c. lights up the entire room well and im able to identify what is in front of me.

Ahh... Beat me too it! I don't have one, but in handling it, it seemed high quality. How is it?

thaiphob25
05-01-2012, 11:43 PM
Ahh... Beat me too it! I don't have one, but in handling it, it seemed high quality. How is it?

Its thick ABS plastic and is pretty sturdy. once you have your light mounted and slide it on your gun its pretty easy to adjust. You have the three positions, Left center and right. the best positions are left and right cause its pretty much lined up with your barrel.

Here is a quick pic from the view behind the gun with light on

http://i1183.photobucket.com/albums/x466/brightcandlephoto/photo.jpg

NeenachGuy
05-01-2012, 11:47 PM
This is not pointed towards you (or meant to be negative, hopefully informative), but 99% of shooters do not think about a shooting or prepare for what a shooting really is. It's dynamic and constantly changing. You may go from shooting a perp, to performing CPR on a family member, all in the same moment, while maintaining a visual on the downed perp. Or the perp may have surrendered... You may have been shot in your weak hand that holds your non mounted light (getting shot in the hand is quite common in gunfights). You never know what will happen, but not having a mounted light has far more disadvantages than having one.


No problem; I appreciate reading your detailed comments. But, what about this one:

If an armed intruder shoots at your light source hoping to take you down, if it is mounted on the weapon, you'd probably be injured or have your gun shot out of your hand. However, with flashlight that is not mounted to your weapon, you have the option to hold the light out to your left or right while you clear the room, thereby disguising your actual position to some degree.

Also, wouldn't a separate flashlight give you more options when moving around corners?

I guess, of course, one could always have both.

fullrearview
05-01-2012, 11:50 PM
Its thick ABS plastic and is pretty sturdy. once you have your light mounted and slide it on your gun its pretty easy to adjust. You have the three positions, Left center and right. the best positions are left and right cause its pretty much lined up with your barrel.

How many rounds have you fired with it attached? Notice any changes in the cycling of your Ruger?

thaiphob25
05-01-2012, 11:59 PM
How many rounds have you fired with it attached? Notice any changes in the cycling of your Ruger?

I actually havent fired my Ruger with the RLS on it yet. But when i rack the slide it doesnt interfere at all.

tbhracing
05-02-2012, 12:00 AM
OP- Hope this helps. I like the TLR-3, FWIW.

2l9jAKf5gNY

Sbasham
05-02-2012, 12:02 AM
This is what I got.

http://www.nebotools.com/prod_details.php?id=164&cid=26

Specifications

Settings – 250 lumens / 125 lumens / 25 lumens / S.O.S. / Defensive Strobe

Runtime – 100% - 4 hours of continuous illumination
50% - 8 hours of continuous illumination
10% - 15 hours of continuous illumination
S.O.S. - 72 hours of continuous illumination
Strobe - 72 hours of continuous illumination

Length – 4.5”
Diameter – 1.5”
Weight – 0.428 lbs.
Batteries – 3 AAA batteries (included)

And with it take AAAs its not gonna cost a fortune to replace the batteries.

fullrearview
05-02-2012, 12:14 AM
No problem; I appreciate reading your detailed comments. But, what about this one:

If an armed intruder shoots at your light source hoping to take you down, if it is mounted on the weapon, you'd probably be injured or have your gun shot out of your hand. However, with flashlight that is not mounted to your weapon, you have the option to hold the light out to your left or right while you clear the room, thereby disguising your actual position to some degree.

Also, wouldn't a separate flashlight give you more options when moving around corners?

I guess, of course, one could always have both.

And that is of course a possibility, but if you are using your light properly, that should not be an issue. I can say from experience though, it takes a lot of repetition to eliminate natural tendencies...

I can't recall the name of the hold (I think it was referred to as the FBI method), but basically, you hold the flashlight out and away from your body at various angles and heights. When training with this hold, guess where mine, and every other shooters strong hand and firearm went? Almost the same position but opposite (right hand with light at 2 o'clock, left hand with gun at 10 o'clock).

With empty weapons, this is quite funny to see for the 1st time.:D Would suck in the middle of a gun fight. IMHO, time would be better spent training on moving to cover instead of an awkward hold, if time was an issue. Other wise, it wont hurt to have that tool in your tool box.

Having an additional light is also a great idea (might not be an option in a home invasion)... There are some advance clearing techniques that I wont go into, but utilizing multiple lights is great.

The biggest thing is training and thinking outside the box. There are many ways to skin a cat. The safariland RLS is a perfect example of this.

fullrearview
05-02-2012, 12:17 AM
I actually havent fired my Ruger with the RLS on it yet. But when i rack the slide it doesnt interfere at all.

Get to the range and make sure that thing works!!!

Other wise, it's cool and thanks for posting that pic. Good for people to see the options they have.

ChaneRZ
05-02-2012, 2:04 AM
I have both.
http://i1108.photobucket.com/albums/h413/chanerz12/f782e657.jpg

ExtremeX
05-02-2012, 2:30 AM
I rock all of the above...

Olight M30 - Main Nightstand/HD light, also makes a good weapon
Klarus XT1C - Compact Nightstand backup & EDC
Fenix PD31 - Nightstand low light - to take a piss at night
Viridian - X5L laser/light combo on pistol
Nightsights...

I'm kind of a flashlight whore... I got about 15 of them.

I agree with everything Tac Responce dude said in the video... but not too keen on his brand loyalty to certain brands. There is plenty of awesome lights out there, and my weapon mounted light/laser of choice is Viridian.

I have about 3000-4000 rounds thought my HD pistol with the Viridian attached, and its never skipped a beat.

Whatever you pick and decide to use for HD... practice with it, and make it part of your range routine. Getting this stuff and not incorporating it into your training is pointless.

ExtremeX
05-02-2012, 2:35 AM
And to the OP, if you want a good light, look at these brands.

Olight, Fenix, Klarus, EagleTac, and a few others. Or call Marshal at goinggear.com and get a few recommendation.

If you care to do your own research, check out http://www.candlepowerforums.com

hossb7
05-02-2012, 7:00 AM
I always came from the philosophy of I would rather wait for an intruder in the dark in the corner for a shot with nightsites

In THIS situation, how would you be able to clearly identify a threat?

As an added note I Don't believe in shooting at a target that I can't identify, but if the door gets kicked in or something crashes through my window I would rather be harder to see rather than easier to see.

Contradiction?

Outta Control
05-02-2012, 7:08 AM
I always came from the philosophy of I would rather wait for an intruder in the dark in the corner for a shot with nightsites, than walk around with a flash light and a laser giving me away, but what are everybody elses opinions? I understand that there are some situations where you need light, So I am looking around at what to get. I don't want to spend $200 on a flashlight, but for a mounted light and laser for fun I might, but I am wondering if it is a waste of money.. Or is it worth it so you can use both hands for a grip on the gun? If I wanted a good, somewhat compact tactical light what is worth looking into that is good quality, but not rediculous in the price range?

As an added note I Don't believe in shooting at a target that I can't identify, but if the door gets kicked in or something crashes through my window I would rather be harder to see rather than easier to see.


I completed a low-light HD course a few months back. What I learned from that course is that different lights are used for different environment and situation. For outdoor use you want a light that puts out lots of candlepower and for indoor use stay with a 120 lumen light. Ideally you want an LED as opposed to an incandescent version. There are techniques on how to do low-light HD defense and I can't really go into details online (it'd be too long) but check around there are training courses available for this type of need.


Update: Here is a link to some past discussion on lights. http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=540551

Outta Control
05-02-2012, 7:13 AM
I just keep a VERY BRIGHT flashlight in the nightstand drawer....

In my experience a very bright light, higher than 120 Lumens, is not an effective way to go. Light colored walls, mirrors or shiny objects, and even TV screens will reflect light that can be a disadvantage as you do your search.

em9sredbeam
05-02-2012, 9:46 AM
In THIS situation, how would you be able to clearly identify a threat?

The only people who have a key to my place is my wife and I. Anyone else is an intruder as far as I am concerned.

Contradiction?

No, I would rather be a more difficult target to see if someone broke into my house. Walking around with a flashlight, giving away your position trying to identify a target seems a little dangerous, (unless you have children downstairs or something, which I don't. It is just the wife and me). But I know, you are the ultimate warrior, the best shooter, and bullet proof so you just flash the light and puff your chest out to deflect bullets right?

Outta Control
05-02-2012, 9:55 AM
OP: You should not think about yourself as being a more difficult target but creating a confusing environment to your suspect. There are several techniques on identifying a threat. Remember you don't need to see the person's face. All you need to first find is their location by seeing a shadow, part of a shirt sleeve, or exposed body part such as a hand or elbow. Then you can announce that you see the subject and that you are armed and have called the authorities. From there you can set commands to safely bring them out to you for further identification.

teflondog
05-02-2012, 10:03 AM
I have a TLR-1 on my nightstand gun. I don't have to point my gun directly at someone to identify them. Even if I point it at the ground or the ceiling, the light has enough spill to see everybody's faces in the room. The hot spot of the beam is also focused enough to act as a huge laser dot for point shooting.

Outta Control
05-02-2012, 10:14 AM
the only issue I have is that your sidearm is at low-ready as your TLR is pointed down while quite possibly the BG is more amp and ready to pounce.

locosway
05-02-2012, 11:04 AM
I always came from the philosophy of I would rather wait for an intruder in the dark in the corner for a shot with nightsites, than walk around with a flash light and a laser giving me away, but what are everybody elses opinions? I understand that there are some situations where you need light, So I am looking around at what to get. I don't want to spend $200 on a flashlight, but for a mounted light and laser for fun I might, but I am wondering if it is a waste of money.. Or is it worth it so you can use both hands for a grip on the gun? If I wanted a good, somewhat compact tactical light what is worth looking into that is good quality, but not rediculous in the price range?

As an added note I Don't believe in shooting at a target that I can't identify, but if the door gets kicked in or something crashes through my window I would rather be harder to see rather than easier to see.

A weapon mounted light is a great addition to your hand held light. Running a weapon light only is discouraged because you have to point in or close to a target/area to see it with the light. There's many times where you might need a light on something and you don't want to point your gun at it.

Handheld lights are great, but they aren't as good as a weapon mounted light if you're shooting. Having both available allows you to use your handheld light for searches or working locks, etc. If you need to keep your gun on a threat, or actively shoot, you would switch to your weapon light.

Night sights have many uses from locating your gun in the dark after you wake up, to allowing better night/low-light sight alignment. The idea that if you can't see your sights, you can't see your target is wrong. There are many lighting situations where your target could be well lit, or lit enough to identify, but your sights not. Getting a silhouette from your sites will probably happen, but night sights will allow for much faster sight acquisition.

I suggest everyone take a night time class so they can try different techniques and understand the reasons behind why you would or wouldn't want to do certain things. This is the only way to get a clear grasp on what's happening instead of making guesses about something a gun shop employee told you 5 years ago.

Outta Control
05-02-2012, 11:11 AM
I agree "Crazy-Way". Everyone who is looking into HD should...no NEED to take some sort of low-light course. There are variables that one has to deal with and also things one has not ever thought of that will place them at a disadvantage.

On a side note. In my line of work I use flashlights a lot and I can safely say that I've used them much differently than I did before.