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View Full Version : anybody ever substitute large rifle primers for large pistol primers?


stilly
04-18-2012, 10:28 PM
I was not paying attention and grabbed the large rifle primers. I dunno how I missed it.

Anyways, I have them loaded up in:

44 mag
240gr Rainier HP
14.7gr Blue Dot
OAL 16.000 (not really but really really really close)


They fit great. Tomorrow I will test them and maybe make some more if they are decent.

xfer42
04-18-2012, 11:09 PM
Ive used them with my Ruger Super Blackhawk .44 mag. The major difference is the thickness of the cup. So if it fits and the hammer can strike it, then it should be fine.

Bill Steele
04-19-2012, 7:33 AM
14.7gr of Blue Dot seems extremely hot. Adding rifle primers to the mix and things just get more sporty.

Where did you get that load?

Did you try anything lighter first?

bruceflinch
04-19-2012, 8:09 AM
I was not paying attention and grabbed the large rifle primers. I dunno how I missed it.

Anyways, I have them loaded up in:

44 mag
240gr Rainier HP
14.7gr Blue Dot
OAL 16.000 (not really but really really really close)

16.000?
They fit great. Tomorrow I will test them and maybe make some more if they are decent.

14.7gr of Blue Dot seems extremely hot. Adding rifle primers to the mix and things just get more sporty.

Where did you get that load?

Did you try anything lighter first?

He had to fill the case up @ 16.000" :D
Yeah, I'd doublecheck some specs & loading info before shooting those loads..:eek:

sargenv
04-19-2012, 8:35 AM
I think that's a typo.. probably meant 1.600". My 610 cylinder is something like 1.635" long or thereabouts.. the 10 mm is generally loaded to about 1.25" but with a really long bullet I could probably load it as long as a 44.. or cut my cylinder to 10mm magnum and still have enough room for the longer bullets.

I'm pretty sure he meant 1.600"

Flyin Brian
04-19-2012, 10:42 AM
The really good thing about shooting a pistol round with a 16.000 OAL is you can tell if the gun is loaded with just a glance :)

Hard to shoot that in a wheelgun though.

rsrocket1
04-19-2012, 11:08 AM
You really shouldn't do that. They are different heights.
LR primers will sit higher in a pistol round and might cause binding in a revolver or something worse in an autoloader or tube magazine.
LP primers will sit below the face of a rifle round and by being thinner, will have a higher chance of a pierced primer and hot gas eroding the firing pin.

I do use SR primers for both rifle and pistol. They are the same size and with SR primers slightly thicker walled, there is no problem in a pistol unless you have a weak striker in your pistol. Don't use SP primers in a rifle. Thinner walls on the SPP's.

Fishslayer
04-19-2012, 11:08 AM
Alliant's website lists 13.7gr of Blue Dot with a Speer GDHP. I would be thinking lighter charge for a Ranier. It's a plated bullet, right?

Be careful out there...

bohoki
04-19-2012, 11:32 AM
i didnt think they would seat flush

ive used small rifle in 9mm no problem

epcii
04-19-2012, 8:18 PM
You really shouldn't do that. They are different heights.
LR primers will sit higher in a pistol round and might cause binding in a revolver or something worse in an autoloader or tube magazine.
LP primers will sit below the face of a rifle round and by being thinner, will have a higher chance of a pierced primer and hot gas eroding the firing pin.

I do use SR primers for both rifle and pistol. They are the same size and with SR primers slightly thicker walled, there is no problem in a pistol unless you have a weak striker in your pistol. Don't use SP primers in a rifle. Thinner walls on the SPP's.

Correct. It would probably be ok in a revolver, but I would definitely not do it in an auto. The taller rifle primers may stick out enough in a pistol case to a point where slam fire may occur.

buffybuster
04-19-2012, 8:22 PM
You really shouldn't do that. They are different heights.
LR primers will sit higher in a pistol round and might cause binding in a revolver or something worse in an autoloader or tube magazine.
LP primers will sit below the face of a rifle round and by being thinner, will have a higher chance of a pierced primer and hot gas eroding the firing pin.

I do use SR primers for both rifle and pistol. They are the same size and with SR primers slightly thicker walled, there is no problem in a pistol unless you have a weak striker in your pistol. Don't use SP primers in a rifle. Thinner walls on the SPP's.

This.

Large Pistol and Rifle primers have different height dimensions. Using LR primers in a pistol primer pocket may have the primer sit proud which is bad..... especially in a heavy recoiling revolver; as those high primers can hit the recoil shield during recoil, which could result in them firing (which is BAD!!!!!!!). It's likely: No, but the risk is there.

Small Pistol and Rifle primers are dimensionally the same but not interchangeable.

Bill Steele
04-19-2012, 8:26 PM
Okay, YES that was a typo.

1.600 was what I went by. I would correct it but not after it was quoted with a joke attached. I will not murder someone elses joke...

I learned a LOT today AND last night too.

I learned how to crimp a round. Crazy because I never knew but the lee carbide die set does not tell you how to crimp. I seated the bullet down and then the extra half inch or two inches or whatever at the bottom of the stroke actually crimped and buckled a shell. SO me being the cheap bastige pulled it out, resized it, reprimed it and reloaded it. I shot that one LAST because I was expecting the case to split and leave half in when it ejected. Nothing like that happened.

I thought long and hard at many loads before trying this out. The rifle primers was an accident. I had 5 boxes of primers and I THOUGHT that I had large pistol magnums but I grabbed large rifle instead. After I saw that I had loaded about 15 and THEN discovered the rifle primers I started looking around to see why I should not shoot them.

They shot fine. I had NO feeding issues with the deagle at all EXCEPT 2 misfires but I think it was because the primers may be a tad thicker? I just pulled the hammer back again and they fired the second time. This is spot on with what someone else had said elsewhere.

AS far as them seating, I had NOT noticed anything different then when I put magnum primers in the 9mm shells. They might be taller by a micron or two but I never noticed any problems with them going into the shells. This being a 44 mag I double checked and they looked about flush or a tad lower then flush.

As far as hot or cold. I REALLY wish that I had a chrony. The shots were not the thunderous shots that I usually feel when I shoot commercial ammo. I was kind of dissappointed because they seemed more like 40 cal. On top of that, there was ONE shell that split in all different directions. Granted it is once fired brass but I think there were other things at play there. When that one shot I looked back at my friend and yelled, Yeah I felt that one. But it was the only one that was LOUD compared to the others. I like it loud but not shell killing loud so maybe there were other things with that.

I THINK I might have crimped it a bit much. At first I had NO idea how to crimp but I noticed that I was not pulling down all the way on my lever so I thought I would see what happened if I did and I nearly gave the bullet a columbian necklace. :eek: Then I pulled it out and resized the bullet and then tried to recrimp it and reseat it (not in that order) and the freaking bullet did not seat right, so I jammed the shell back up to the seater and recrimped it even a bit harder. It came out like a .22 able to spin a bit and all, I figured it would have to do.

I guestimated that the loads were possibly on the low end of the range and after shooting them with nowhere near the thunder or the shockwave I think I can push them faster. If I am gonna reload for the deagle I want it to be the showstopping 44 mag that the commercial ammo makes it to be.

I am not glued to this blue dot load but I am thinking of going for some 44 mag 200gr cast bullets (found 1000 for about $100) unless there are better deals. My load REALLY should use blue dot though because I have three bottles of it.

All of the shells looked okay except for this ONE:

Http://www.stillyvision.com/files/deagle/bad.jpg

You misunderstand a lot. I hate to be so blunt, but if you keep up with your line of thinking, you are going to get hurt.

A given powder may or may not deliver a "thunderous" bang like a full house factory load and it still may be over pressure. The feel of the recoil and the sound of the bang is not how you judge if you are under/over pressure.

Recoil is a result of the muzzle energy developed by the bullet and its velocity (among a few other less important items). Unless you get to the slower powders that are used for this caliber like AA #9 and W296/H110, you are not going to get that 240gr bullet going as fast as it might and as such, you are not going to get that wow factor you want. Unless except if you keep pouring more Blue Dot into your cases, at some point you are going to get a wow factor you will be sorry for later.

You need to stop loading and sit down and read a few loading books, slowly and repeatedly until you understand what is actually going on as you approach max load levels for a given type of powder. You need to learn how the burn rate and burn characteristics relate to the caliber and weight of bullet you are loading.

After you have read the manuals, you need to start loading using the loads in the books and the powder manufacturers web sites and not go over that number for a really long time. If you are at book max for a given powder and you are not getting the results you expected, you need to switch powders and start over with the book start loads, working up slowly, after you read about the many signs of over pressure.

Sorry again for being so blunt, but you are really playing with fire here.

BTW, Alliant recently put out some communications on not using Bluedot for certain Magnum handgun loads. IIRC, they were concerning .41 Magnum and the powders propesity for pressure spikes. I know they have dialed down the max pressure loads on some calibers from previous load data, probably to address these issues. I am not trying to scare you away from using Blue Dot, I love it for my 10mm loads, just would like it if you retain all you fingers.

rsrocket1
04-20-2012, 5:02 AM
I THINK I might have crimped it a bit much. At first I had NO idea how to crimp but I noticed that I was not pulling down all the way on my lever so I thought I would see what happened if I did and I nearly gave the bullet a columbian necklace. :eek: Then I pulled it out and resized the bullet and then tried to recrimp it and reseat it (not in that order) and the freaking bullet did not seat right, so I jammed the shell back up to the seater and recrimped it even a bit harder. It came out like a .22 able to spin a bit and all, I figured it would have to do.



You probably pushed down so hard that you bulged the case and lost all neck tension. Then the crimp was all that was holding the bullet in the case.

Crimps are what hold the bullet in place to keep them from being pulled out from recoil in revolvers, getting pushed in while in tube magazines in lever guns and from getting moved during shipment in military ammo. It adds very little to the initiation pressure when you fire that particular cartridge.

Neck tension is what keeps the bullet in place when the primer goes off. It allows the primer flame to ignite the surface of all the powder at once. Without the proper neck tension, the pressure will be considerably lower and in the case of slow rifle powders, you can actually drive the bullet out into the barrel before all the powder ignites. When the powder does ignite, the bullet is now stuck in the rifling and you get a second pressure spike which sometimes causes a kaboom.

You really should read up and learn a little more about how to adjust your dies for a mild/medium/heavy roll crimp and use your calipers to make sure you aren't bulging out your cases. A chrony will help a lot and you would probably have been surprised to see your velocities with those rounds. They were probably all over the place and that "spinner" round would have probably been the lowest of all. If that "yeah I felt that one" round was way over predicted velocity, you probably exceeded max pressure for that gun too.

Cheep
04-20-2012, 5:56 AM
Did that case have a flattened primer?

Bill Steele
04-20-2012, 9:33 AM
Cheep: No. THe primer actually looks pretty decent. it has the rounded edge and everything.

Bill Steel: Thanks for that good information. I have working my way through the Book of Lee and I also have the Book of Lyman. Perhaps it is my overanalyzation of everything but when I read this stuff it kinda makes sense but then some things I do not yet get. Powder burn rates in relationship to reloading I do not yet fully understand. I DO know that putting in too much powder is not necessarily going to make it go faster and still be safe.

I have H110 and AA7 also. I orignally wanted the AA7 but nobody had it in stock so I looked some more and according to the Book of Lee it seemed that Blue dot was a decent load as well. Of course I expect my velocities to be around the 1200-1400 range.

I tend to spend a couple of hours or more a day reading about primers, messing with the press, measuring accurately the powder etc etc. I became bored and decided to go out and get some hands on as well as reading. I made some 9mm loads that were decent and I shot another 150 of them last night and they were all good but I wanted to make some nice magnum loads too since I had all of that blue dot sitting around and my deagle is almost out of factory ammo. I think I am up to chapter nine or something in the Book of Lee. I now have the Book of Lyman as well because I was not satisfied with what I was seeing in the Book of Lee.

The one round that was more of a blast was only more of a blast in relation to the others that were being shot. They were all mild .40 but one felt like a .45. :\

Are there any other places where I can go to get the data faster without all of the narritives and stories and beating around the bush that the Book of Lee tends to do? I do not know if they have a powder burn listing but I have seen several lists in various places but they are just lists. It would be nice to see those in this range are better for these loads, these are better for these loads and of course some would overlap but it would make sense if I saw it like that. I have not seen anything like that, So far all that I have seen is a list from fastest to slowest and it realy sucks when one chart shows WST on at the number 20 spot and another shows WST on at the 35 spot. It seems that really nothing is consistent and everything is in a gray area.

That is actually the single most frustrating thing that I have seen with reloading. There is so much conflicting data that I probably spend more time then I should going over and double/triple checking things and cross referencing data to make the calculations that my particular load is in the SAFE zone.

The second most frustrating thing is trying to figure out how to use those damn digital calipers properly. One way it is 1.607 the other way it is 1.612 and another way it is 1.589 and another way it is 1.609. I can measure a round and get 3 different numbers and if I squeeze a bit more I can change them up a bit.

Then I have my die setup and I THOUGHT it was good but as it turns out the thing keeps making bullets longer and longer so they are off by .014 as I continue to go. Locked down on the plate and everything they should not move. Maybe I am using the press too slow?

Reading through Lee and Lyman will be really good for your understanding. Like any subject that has a lot of moving parts, when you are learning it, the stuff you don't fully understand, maybe because the author/teacher is not great at explaining, are usually the subjects that are most important. Keep at it, reread when you get stumped, you will get it.

Specifically to burn rate and pressures. Most powders have a burn rate curve. That is they burn faster as pressures rise inside the case. Powder manufacturers know this and treat the powders so they can achieve specific results. What all this means is a given powder will end up being the ideal powder for a given bullet weight (and bearing surface) for a particular caliber. The problem with this burn rate curve is it is a little different for each powder. In addition, the actual curve changes as you go up in pressure. This characteristic makes playing above published max loads a game for the highly experienced (with the specific powder/caliber/bullet weight as well as reloading in general).

Blue Dot is a great magnum powder and you will find it will perform really well (from a max velocity viewpoint) in your Deagle with bullets that are on the lighter side (closer to 180gr size). Powders like Accurate Arms #9 and W296/H110 will work better in your Deagle when you want maximum velocity (wow factor) with heavier bullets (like 240gr and above). The reason is they tend to burn a little slower than Bluedot. In my experience H110/W296 seems to act like an even slower powder than its place on the burn rate chart. It will give you the wow factor you want with those 240gr slugs, but make sure you keep to the loading guidelines that Hodgdon publishes (available on their website), best not to go above max loads or below start loads. Also, when shooting plated, check with the manufacturer and make sure you can push those as high as H110 will do, Berry's for instance says to keep their bullets under 1200fps. You may have to go to jacketed bullets to get the big boom you want.

There is a lot of conflicting information available and the really confounding thing is most of it is right (in a given gun, with a given bullet, etc. etc.). The only way to handle all the conflicting information is to take it slow, be conservative and use you own experience over time to sort things out. For instance, you will hear guys talk about how they use primer flattening as a pressure measure. You will hear other, very experienced guys, explain they have blown guns up while trying to use flattened primers as a pressure sign. In my personal experience I can use primers as an indication on certain loads (including what caliber, gun, powder AND primer brand) and on some loads and guns it is useless as a pressure sign. Experience is the only way you will sort this kind of stuff. For now, stay inside published loads and you won't ruin your gun or your day at the range.

On the calipers, keep at it and you will start getting a feel. The good news is OAL is a highly misunderstood subject and for the most part is far less important to pressures than how much powder you are stuffing in the case.

Have fun, good luck.

stilly
04-20-2012, 8:58 PM
... Reading through Lee and Lyman will be really good for your understanding. Like any subject that has a lot of moving parts, when you are learning it, the stuff you don't fully understand, maybe because the author/teacher is not great at explaining, are usually the subjects that are most important. Keep at it, reread when you get stumped, you will get it.

...

Blue Dot is a great magnum powder and you will find it will perform really well (from a max velocity viewpoint) in your Deagle with bullets that are on the lighter side (closer to 180gr size). Powders like Accurate Arms #9 and W296/H110 will work better in your Deagle when you want maximum velocity (wow factor) with heavier bullets (like 240gr and above). The reason is they tend to burn a little slower than Bluedot. In my experience H110/W296 seems to act like an even slower powder than its place on the burn rate chart. It will give you the wow factor you want with those 240gr slugs, but make sure you keep to the loading guidelines that Hodgdon publishes (available on their website), best not to go above max loads or below start loads. Also, when shooting plated, check with the manufacturer and make sure you can push those as high as H110 will do, Berry's for instance says to keep their bullets under 1200fps. You may have to go to jacketed bullets to get the big boom you want.

There is a lot of conflicting information available and the really confounding thing is most of it is right (in a given gun, with a given bullet, etc. etc.). The only way to handle all the conflicting information is to take it slow, be conservative and use you own experience over time to sort things out. For instance, you will hear guys talk about how they use primer flattening as a pressure measure. You will hear other, very experienced guys, explain they have blown guns up while trying to use flattened primers as a pressure sign. In my personal experience I can use primers as an indication on certain loads (including what caliber, gun, powder AND primer brand) and on some loads and guns it is useless as a pressure sign. Experience is the only way you will sort this kind of stuff. For now, stay inside published loads and you won't ruin your gun or your day at the range.

On the calipers, keep at it and you will start getting a feel. The good news is OAL is a highly misunderstood subject and for the most part is far less important to pressures than how much powder you are stuffing in the case.

Have fun, good luck.

DAMN Bill. I wish we were neighbors. You have been doing this a LONG time to talk with that kind of confidence. :)

I get so frustrated with having to keep all of these sources and notes around and go back and forth and what not. I DID note that I picked up somewhere that you gain about 50 fps for every inch of barrel (or was it take away 50 fps for every inch shorter) on loads. With that said, today I stopped in to Turners after the Skeet Clinic and bought some 200 gr Hornady HP/XTP bullets. According to the Book of Lyman those shot out of a 4" barrel at about 14xx fps with H110. I DO have 2 bottles of H110 but I realy wanted my blue dot. to be used BUT since it is all reloading I have decided to use that H110 AND I also got the Accurate #7 in so that I can properly use the 240gr plated bullets. I also picked up 500 LPM primers so I am looking to have a party now. If I can just find a good bullet swaging die to transform 40 cal brass into jacketed .430 ammo that would be a good thing. As it is I find myself looking for some 44 jacketed 180-200gr bullets. That is my biggest weakness. I bought all of these damn plated bullets on midway back when they were on sale and I am glad that I have 9m, 45, and 44 but these 44 can not be used to do what I want so I have to load them with different powders now. NOW my collection of powders is growing and that is starting to concern me because this is what I did NOT want to do. I only wanted to get about 3-4 powders and use them. Now I have about 5-6 already.

If I were to get a hold of the 9, 40, 45, 44, and 38/357 data from the Books and combine them all would that be a good/bad thing to base my future loads off of? The Book of Lyman is rather conservative where the Book of Lee is rather edgy (gave half grain more for a particular 180gr 40 cal load with unique) so I could have a load chart that would show a really conservative load ranging to a possibly safe yet hot load. Does that make sense? That is my next project I am thinking.

Also, do you have any opinion on a program called Quickload? A guy sold me some 50 AE jacketed bullets that he swaged but NOW that I know what I know about reloading I sure do NOT want to load them without something showing that they are safe. I dunno, I just do not feel right about launching a 400gr/650gr bullet out of my Deagle with nothing to really support what I made and why I did that. The sad thing here is that these manufacturers have not included these bullets in their data so I am stuck with having to buy speer or gold dot 300/335 or something like that JHP for the 50 AE. I already shot a factory load out of another Deagle that was all 50 AE. I don't want to take a chance of blowing something up because I did not get the "science" behind it.

Anyways, this guy asked me what powders and barrel length I was using and he said that he could provide me with reloading data. I saw that the program he was using was called Quickload. It is a rather pricey program but if it could give me good load recipes that would certainly be a plus. Of course I can tell that I might have to start checking my loads with powder manufacturers' numbers as well.

Thanks for al the info. I am still fighting with the stupid digital caliper...

Bill Steele
04-20-2012, 10:11 PM
I have not used quickload, but a number of guys on these threads have it and use it. I can only speak for what I have read on various forums. Many love it, many swear by it, some say it is not accurate for straight walled pistol loads (i.e. for bottle neck rifle cartridges only). Like everything else in reloading, they are all probably right and wrong at some point.

Don't get too frustrated, just take it slow and enjoy the ride. When in doubt, start conservative and work up slowly. Stay within book loads until you really get to know a given powder in a given caliber for a given gun. It won't take long for you to master all the important variables and you will really start having fun, and you will also be safe.

If you get some lighter bullets, the Bluedot will be a front runner performer in your Deagle. If you ever get a 10mm and like WOW factor, load up some max book Blue Dot loads for some 135gr bullets. The people around you at the range will think you are shooting a combination flame thrower/howitzer. You know, the wow finish.

Also, you will use up all that powder. With the big dogs you are shooting, a one pound bottle doesn't last long.

On the books, I think Lyman is probably the better "how-to", except for the section Lee has on downloading rifle loads and shooting lead in rifles. There is some really great stuff in there. I think Lee is much better with regard to loads. Like any load book, always cross reference it. Hodgdon, Accurate, Alliant and Vihtavuori among others all have their load data available online. It is a terrific reference. VV's data won't blow your gun up, but their published velocities can be suspect at times.

In time, you will be able to guesstimate without looking for a given powder when starting a new caliber. When you check the references, you will be surprised how close you were in your guess for a good start load. To me, with the powders with which I am most familar, they have a personality, I kind of know what to expect. The ones with personality defects, I don't buy anymore.

Have fun, go slow, among all things be safe, enjoy the ride.

Cheep
04-21-2012, 7:30 AM
On the calipers... use the SAME tension when measuring as you do when checking them for zero, light touch should do.

John Browning
04-21-2012, 12:42 PM
You iz gonna blow yoself up!

Seriously, read up and DO NOT deviate from published data. Reloading is not a chose your own adventure situation. Primers can create tremendous variations in pressure, and you can't just plug one in because it kind of fits.

Cheep
04-22-2012, 3:07 PM
The difference in COL may be the case nearest the rim contacting the shell holder instead of the head of the case...

bandook
04-24-2012, 1:40 PM
Stilly,
What reloading equipment you using? I ask because if you don't slow down the 'sperimentin', that equipment may be on the market pretty soon.

Perhaps if you make purchases based on what you want to make instead of buying random stuff and going Hmm... I wonder if I take a 44 Mag case, use a Large Rifle Primer, a hefty load of Blue Dot with some sort of a bullet on top, I wonder if it'll make a REALLY loud bang.

Not trying to dissuade you from reloading by any means, but things can turn ugly very quick.

The #7 load is;
240gr Ranier Flat Point ; 15.6gr (max) [14gr(min)]; COL 1.575.

Be safe.

Cheep
04-24-2012, 7:36 PM
You may have bullets that don't match the bullet seater. Remove the bullet seater from your die & look carefully to see if they mate together properly, this and inconsistent shape of the bullet may cause your COL differences.

stilly
04-25-2012, 8:05 AM
Stilly,
What reloading equipment you using? I ask because if you don't slow down the 'sperimentin', that equipment may be on the market pretty soon.

Perhaps if you make purchases based on what you want to make instead of buying random stuff and going Hmm... I wonder if I take a 44 Mag case, use a Large Rifle Primer, a hefty load of Blue Dot with some sort of a bullet on top, I wonder if it'll make a REALLY loud bang.

Not trying to dissuade you from reloading by any means, but things can turn ugly very quick.

The #7 load is;
240gr Ranier Flat Point ; 15.6gr (max) [14gr(min)]; COL 1.575.

Be safe.

I am using a Lee Turret Press. I stopped in to Turners in Corona and Picked up 500 LPP (yay!) and a box of 100 200gr hornady xtp. Of course I also got my AAC#7 in with 6000 LPP and SPP from powder valley so I was already good to go in that respect.

I did not see any Rainiers on sale in FP when I bought them, I only saw the HP ones and I thought that those would be popular with folks so I bought them.

I saw the load you are talking about. I was originally going to make that but I had to AAC#7 so I tried to make Blue Dot work since I had seen it on another load that was kind of similar. NOW that I have AAC#7 I was going to make that but I was concerned with pressure because of what I have read. Why is a longer bullet (240gr rainier) being pressed into a case to make a shorter cartridge then the 200gr XTP that I did (COL 1.610 per Book of Lyman) ? Is that something that I should be concerned with or did I misread somewhere? 1.610 200gr vs. 1.575 240gr. Wouldn't that create a lot more pressure? I just got to chapter 10 in the Book of Lee and my head spun some times durring some of the reading I did so maybe I missed something. Normally I would have just made those bullets but the Book of Lyman dictates different COL for different bullet shapes/sizes so I was wanting to doublecheck the Book of Lee since that looks like a REALLY short COL to me. I know I am a noob still but I just wanted to make certain that this was the way to proceed.

IF I can make the 240gr HP Rainiers work with H110 or the AAC#7 then that is great. I can't imagine that I am the only person in the world that has looked for the best sounding copper plated 240gr load for a 44 mag though...

The only 240gr that the Book of Lyman had was I THINK a FP of some sort.
And if HP/RN/FP does not matter then why do some designate it and some do not? The Book of Lee does not where the Book of Lyman Does. OR did I read something incorrectly again?

stilly
04-25-2012, 8:07 AM
You may have bullets that don't match the bullet seater. Remove the bullet seater from your die & look carefully to see if they mate together properly, this and inconsistent shape of the bullet may cause your COL differences.

I am using Lee carbide dies and they seem to fit together pretty good. I suspect problems if I get the FTX bullets with the pointy tips though. Apparently I might also have to trim down the cases too. (NOOOOO!)