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View Full Version : NAA mini .22lr and remington 'golden bullet' 36grn lead hollowpoint


Badmusic
04-15-2012, 9:57 AM
Gentlemen, I recently had an interesting and unusual experience. I own the subject noted revolver and was using the noted ammunition. I generally store the firearm loaded in a locked cabinet. When I went to the range last time, as usual I fire whatever I had stored in the gun, and at the end of the day replace it with whatever "fresh" ammo I have left over, until I go out to the range again. I usually shoot every month but for this or this little gun, I had not brought it out in over a year. Here is the unusual part...I expect the occasional misfire or "dud" round with most makes of .22lr ammo, but this sucker misfired ALL 5 Rounds. I immediately thought that maybe there was a problem with the hammer not making full contact with the primer, as the indentations on the back of all five rounds were a little bit light, though they were definitely there. I reloaded with "new" rounds of the same make, and everything worked fine the rest of the day. At the end, I tried to re-fire the duds. They would not fire. On this particular model, the hammer rests in a groove between cylinders, and not on the round when at 'rest', so my thinking that maybe the pressure bent the brass just enough to make the hammer fall "light" on the rounds that were in the chamber doesn't explain it, and even if that happened, it seems it should affect only the first round. (as it is possible to accidentally store the gun with the hammer resting on a live round, though I use the groove)

Now, that's as far as my thinking takes me. I have never ever ever experienced five sequential misfires in a row, let alone from the same box of ammo, where all the rest of the ammo functioned fine.

What are the odds of that?? Anyone have any idea why I might have experienced this?

bussda
04-15-2012, 10:52 AM
The issue is chemical, not mechanical. Gun oil and bore solvent migrated inside the rounds. One year to degrade the primer and powder.

The NAA in the safety position does not contact the shells at all.

Mojave Desert
04-15-2012, 11:11 AM
Would this "locked cabinet" be subject to higher than normal tempertures, such as being in the sun or a hot car? Hot temps can melt the wax lube on .22 bullets, contaminating the powder and/or the priming mix.

If you must keep your loaded .22 in this environment, change out ammo more than once a year.

ojisan
04-15-2012, 12:38 PM
Both of the above posts are correct.
I would use a quailty plated / jacketed bullet round to eliminate the possibilty of a melting wax problem.
After sitting a year it is also possible the gun is a little sticky inside from dried up oil.
After a few rounds and some heat the gun loosened up.
The gun needs a detailed cleaning.
These are tough to get back together if you take them apart.
If you are not confident with disassembly, I would remove the grips then blast the crud out the action with some brake cleaner aerosol spray.

You want to use something like brake cleaner that will disolve the gunk and let it run out without leaving any residue behind.

Badmusic
04-17-2012, 4:15 AM
Ok, great information. I would not have come up with this on my own, thank you. The cabinet in question is a safe in my closet, so temperature melting wax is probably not it. I'm going with oil or solvent migrating inside the casing, as I do tend to store my guns leaning to the "wet" side. Great to know there are explanations outside of mechanical failure. Again, thank you.

big al
04-17-2012, 4:55 AM
Golden Bullets are notorious for problems. Try other brands and see what happens.

PoorRichRichard
04-17-2012, 9:59 AM
The issue is chemical, not mechanical. Gun oil and bore solvent migrated inside the rounds. One year to degrade the primer and powder.

I know it's is a rimfire forum, but does this hold true for centerfire handgun rounds as well? I shoot almost all wally world FMJs and lead wadcutter reloads at the range, but at home I keep my gun loaded with JHPs for HD. Should I be changing out my HD rounds every 6 months or so?

ojisan
04-17-2012, 12:06 PM
Not as likely for centerfire as the bullet to case fit is much tighter and less likely to leak.
Many high-dollar factory defense and mil-spec ammo uses a sealant around the bullet and primer to make sure there is no leakage.

A light, a very, very light, film of oil is all that is needed on a gun.
Too much oil causes problems like what we are talking about here...the oil can kill the ammo and gunk up the works.

bussda
04-17-2012, 12:07 PM
I know it's is a rimfire forum, but does this hold true for centerfire handgun rounds as well? I shoot almost all wally world FMJs and lead wadcutter reloads at the range, but at home I keep my gun loaded with JHPs for HD. Should I be changing out my HD rounds every 6 months or so?

General rule: Yes.

The difference in construction is big enough that they are not easily compared. To address this in centerfire you need 'oil proof' rounds.

PoorRichRichard
04-17-2012, 3:55 PM
#9 & #8. Thanx guys.

And I'll echo what others have said here- Reminton Gold Bullets are crap.

johnny1290
04-18-2012, 1:23 AM
I have 2 NAA revolvers and those rem gold bullets are crap.

and everything the others had to say x 2

:)

Badmusic
04-18-2012, 10:21 AM
OK! Down with Remington golden bullets! Never again!

What are your opinions for ammo in this gun, for "last ditch self defense third line" pocket pistol use?

bussda
04-18-2012, 11:38 AM
Ammo selection criteria:
Is it reliable?
Do you have confidence in it?

Irrational nonscienific suggestions:
CCI Stinger
CCI Quikshok
Aquila SSS

gorn5150
04-18-2012, 1:30 PM
OK! Down with Remington golden bullets! Never again!

What are your opinions for ammo in this gun, for "last ditch self defense third line" pocket pistol use?

CCI Stinger is the round I use.

Quickdraw Mcgraw
04-20-2012, 4:04 PM
60gn Aquila SSS is what I keep in mine. Works decent, but keyholes after about 20ft. Almost like a dum-dum bullet. Be carefull of Super high velocity in this gun as the cylinder walls are pretty thin. I had to send one back for a new cylinder.