PDA

View Full Version : McCain says he backs no gun control


SemiAutoSam
04-18-2007, 8:17 PM
Can we believe a POLITICIAN ? Is he only doing this to look good in the eyes of firearms owners ? What is his motivation if its not the truth ?

News.
http://news.search.yahoo.com/search/news?fr=news-storylinks&p=%22John%20McCain%22&c=&n=20&yn=c&c=news&cs=nw

Bio.
http://yahoo.capwiz.com/y/bio/?id=192

Voting record.
http://yahoo.capwiz.com/y/bio/keyvotes/?id=192







http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070419/ap_on_el_pr/virginia_tech_gun_control2008
McCain says he backs no gun control By CALVIN WOODWARD, Associated Press Writer
45 minutes ago



WASHINGTON - Republican presidential candidate John McCain (news, bio, voting record) declared Wednesday he believes in "no gun control," making the strongest affirmation of support for gun rights in the GOP field since the Virginia Tech massacre.


The Arizona senator said in Summerville, S.C., that the country needs better ways to identify dangerous people like the gunman who killed 32 people and himself in the Blacksburg, Va., rampage. But he opposed weakening gun rights and, when asked whether ammunition clips sold to the public should be limited in size, said, "I don't think that's necessary at all."

GOP rival Rudy Giuliani, too, voiced his support for the Second Amendment on Wednesday, but not in such absolute terms. Once an advocate of strong federal gun controls, the former New York mayor said "this tragedy does not alter the Second Amendment" while indicating he favors the right of states to pass their own restrictions.

Other candidates in both parties have stayed largely silent on the issue in the immediate aftermath of the killings, except to express their sorrow.

McCain has opposed many gun controls in the Senate over the years but broke from most of his party — and his past — in supporting legislation to require background checks for buyers at gun shows. In one such vote, he relished taking a position at odds with the National Rifle Association.

In a speech Wednesday to a crowd of 400, McCain was unequivocal in support of the right to bear arms.

"I do not believe we should tamper with the Second Amendment of the Constitution of the United States," he said. A woman shouted that George Washington's troops used muskets, not automatic weapons.

"I hope that we can find better ways of identifying people such as this sick young man so that we can prevent them from not only taking action with guns but with knives or with anything else that will harm their fellow citizens," McCain said.

McCain reiterated that later with reporters.

"I strongly support the Second Amendment and I believe the Second Amendment ought to be preserved — which means no gun control," McCain said.

The candidates' silence and discomfort may become insupportable once the nation finds its voice in the aftermath of the Virginia Tech murders.

Democrats have been deliberately muted for months on an issue that, by their own reckoning, contributed to and perhaps sealed their defeat in the 2000 presidential election. That's when Al Gore's call for gun registration cost him votes in rural America and dulled the party's appetite for taking on the gun lobby.

Top Republicans in the race are trying to close ranks with their party's conservative base on a variety of issues, making gun control an unusually sensitive one for them, too, thanks to their liberal views in the past.

With facts still unfolding, the killer was described as a creepy loner who had been accused of stalking two women, wrote violent schoolwork, been sent to mental health counseling for suspected suicidal tendencies, and scared some fellow students out of coming to class — yet did not have a criminal record that might have stopped him from buying his guns.

Giuliani's emphasis on state-by-state solutions to gun control in the GOP primaries contrasts with his past enthusiasm for a federal mandate to register handgun owners — an even stiffer requirement than registering guns.

Giuliani, as New York mayor and former Senate prospect, and Republican Mitt Romney, as Massachusetts governor and as a Senate candidate in the 1990s, supported the federal ban on assault-type weapons, background checks on gun purchases and other restrictions reviled by many gun-rights advocates.

The other New Yorker in this race, Democratic Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, also supported proposals for state-issued photo gun licenses, as well as a national registry for handgun sales, in positions laid out for crime-weary New Yorkers in 2000.

In this campaign, candidates in both parties who've ever taken a shot at a prey are playing up their hunting credentials. Others are highlighting their allegiance to the constitutional right to bear arms or avoiding the question altogether.

Democratic candidate John Edwards, despite recently highlighting his boyhood outings hunting birds, rabbits and deer as well as his respect for gun ownership rights, backed his party's main gun control measures when he was in the Senate.

Illinois Sen. Barack Obama (news, bio, voting record), as a state lawmaker in the 1990s, supported a ban on semiautomatic weapons and tougher state restrictions on firearms.

Mass shootings have often been the catalyst for legislative action on gun control, with mixed results.

And with Democrats controlling Congress partly on the strength of new members from rural parts of the country, few lawmakers were expecting the Virginia Tech assault to revive the most far-reaching gun-control proposals of the past, such as national licensing or registration.

In 1999, after the Columbine High School killings in Colorado left 15 dead, lawmakers unsuccessfully introduced dozens of bills to require mandatory child safety locks on new handguns, ban "Saturday night specials," increase the minimum age for gun purchases and require background checks on weapons bought at gun shows.

A month after the Columbine shootings, then-Vice President Gore cast the tie-breaking vote in the Senate to advance a juvenile crime bill that included gun show restrictions. But the bill died in negotiations with the House.

The Virginia Tech senior and South Korean native identified as the Blacksburg gunman, Cho Seung-Hui, was a legal permanent resident of the U.S., meaning he could legally buy a handgun unless he had been convicted of a felony. The campus killings were carried out with 9 mm and .22-caliber handguns

xenophobe
04-18-2007, 8:36 PM
Of course he doesn't. Well except for another Assault Weapons ban... including a high capacity magazine ban... and probably a .50 BMG ban...

sorensen440
04-18-2007, 8:37 PM
I would like to believe it but its a coin toss with any of them these days it would seem

jumbopanda
04-18-2007, 8:52 PM
I still trust him more than Guiliani or Romney. You know someone doesn't believe in/understand the Second Amendment when they try to appeal to gun owners by claiming to be a hunter.

cartman
04-18-2007, 9:10 PM
Why do elections feel like you vote on the guy who will screw up or screw you less then the other guy.

jumbopanda
04-18-2007, 9:12 PM
Why do elections feel like you vote on the guy who will screw up or screw you less then the other guy.

Such is the nature of politics. Although this wouldn't be the case if Ron Paul were a candidate though...

jjperl
04-18-2007, 9:14 PM
I don't believe the guy, politicians will tell you what ever you wana hear to get elected these days

cartman
04-18-2007, 10:04 PM
I know thats the nature of current politics. Just a sad realization.

Josh3239
04-18-2007, 10:29 PM
OnTheIssues.com says that he voted:
-No on Brady Bill and the assault weapon ban
-Yes on repealing existing gun restrictions; penalize criminal use
-Yes on prohibiting lawsuits against gun manufacturers
-Yes on banning lawsuits against gun manufacturers for gun violence

But then it said he also supports a ban on "junk guns" and certain assault weapons. What ever that means.

Can anyone confirm this?

SemiAutoSam
04-18-2007, 10:30 PM
Check the congressional record.



OnTheIssues.com says that he voted:
-No on Brady Bill and the assault weapon ban
-Yes on repealing existing gun restrictions; penalize criminal use
-Yes on prohibiting lawsuits against gun manufacturers
-Yes on banning lawsuits against gun manufacturers for gun violence

But then it said he also supports a ban on "junk guns" and certain assault weapons. What ever that means.

Can anyone confirm this?

Josh3239
04-18-2007, 10:40 PM
He definetly voted against the old Federal AW ban.

sorensen440
04-23-2007, 8:06 PM
His voting record in regards to guns looks good
07/13/2006 Firearm Confiscation Prohibition Amendment Y
07/29/2005 Firearms Manufacturers Protection bill Y
07/28/2005 Child Safety Lock Amendment Y
03/02/2004 Firearms Manufacturers Protection bill Y
05/20/1999 Gun Show Sale Regulation Amendment N
07/21/1998 Gun Lock Requirement Amendment Y
11/20/1993 Brady Handgun bill N
11/19/1993 Brady Bill - Waiting Period Sunset N
11/17/1993 Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement N

E Pluribus Unum
04-23-2007, 8:24 PM
Can we believe a DEM ? Is he only doing this to look good in the eyes of firearms owners ? What is his motivation if its not the truth ?

I am sorry to throw a little monkey wrench into your logic machine but John Mccain is a republican from one of the least regulated states in the union- Arizona.

His vote on firearms should be of no surprise.

patman
04-23-2007, 9:07 PM
McCain sounds better than the others...

Yeah, a 60cal Mini-ball with no antibiotics was better.. "A woman shouted that George Washington's troops used muskets, not automatic weapons."

I'd only ban my wallet from guns that break/kaboom before finishing the mag :rolleyes:
But then it said he also supports a ban on "junk guns" and certain assault weapons. What ever that means.

M. Sage
04-23-2007, 9:12 PM
Can we believe a DEM ?

Can we believe a Republican?

Hint: if the speaker in question is a politician, the speaker is LYING.

Guess that's kind of a strong hint...

scootergmc
04-23-2007, 9:14 PM
It's Sam. I'm sure he meant to say DEM.

I would be disappointed if he didn't mean it.... :(

E Pluribus Unum
04-23-2007, 9:25 PM
It's Sam. I'm sure he meant to say DEM.

I would be disappointed if he didn't mean it.... :(

He meant to say DEM, and he did say DEM.... the problem is Mccain is NOT a DEM... he is a full fledged Republican.... :)

Prc329
04-23-2007, 9:44 PM
He meant to say DEM, and he did say DEM.... the problem is Mccain is NOT a DEM... he is a full fledged Republican.... :)

I have often heard people refer to McCain as a dem in disguise.

SemiAutoSam
04-23-2007, 9:50 PM
I FIXED IT. I don't GID if he is a DEM or a REP. They all think and lie the same.

there is no favoritism of hate when it come to me and politicians.

I hate them all equally they are all scum sucking vermin IMHO.

The same goes for the Shub in the House on Penn Ave in WADC

He meant to say DEM, and he did say DEM.... the problem is Mccain is NOT a DEM... he is a full fledged Republican.... :)