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View Full Version : Question for the 10/22 guys


STAGE 2
03-31-2012, 9:35 PM
If I'm going to replace the receiver, barrel, stock, trigger housing, and trigger group, is it actually worth buying a stock ruger to begin with, or just buy the missing parts not listed above (bolt, firing pin, etc)?

223556
03-31-2012, 9:38 PM
Buy the parts not included.
No point in replacing your receiver (since its the part registered) if your going to buy an aftermarket receiver.

the_midwesterner
03-31-2012, 9:58 PM
^^^ agreed.

I started modifying my factory, just to realize that if I build it the way I want it then basically most if not all parts will be replaced. So... I put it back together and am ordering all the parts separately.

sholling
04-01-2012, 12:26 AM
I agree, if you're buying an aftermarket receiver then just buy all of the parts and build it from scratch.

htfan
04-01-2012, 8:47 AM
The answer depends on your goal...

In my situation, I started out slowly improving my 10/22 with a different stock, barrel, trigger parts, etc. Then decided to bring everything back to stock and build a second custom rifle out of the parts. The biggest decision was the receiver to use. (And the $$ to spend.)

Purchasing another stock 10/22 would be less expensive than picking out individual parts, but do you want to end up with another stock rifle?

Merc1138
04-01-2012, 9:39 AM
Buy the parts not included.
No point in replacing your receiver (since its the part registered) if your going to buy an aftermarket receiver.

10/22 receivers aren't registered(yet anyway).

But yes, if you're going to be replacing the receiver, barrel, trigger group, trigger housing, and stock you might as well not bother with buying a stock 10/22 in the first place. Just get a bolt assembly, the pins to hold the trigger housing, and a charging handle assembly. It's definitely not worth buying a ruger 10/22 just for those.

JNunez23
04-01-2012, 11:00 AM
Depends...you figure you will practically be replacing the entire rifle.

But then again, at least you will have a rifle to shoot while you swap out and upgrade parts.

If you are patient enough, just build your dream 10/22.

ojisan
04-01-2012, 11:04 AM
10/22 receivers aren't registered(yet anyway).

Ummm...the receiver IS the registered part on a 10/22 rifle...it is the one with the serial # on it.
Perhaps you are thinking of the MK and 22/45 series pistols where the barrel is the numbered part.
:)

Merc1138
04-01-2012, 12:32 PM
Ummm...the receiver IS the registered part on a 10/22 rifle...it is the one with the serial # on it.
Perhaps you are thinking of the MK and 22/45 series pistols where the barrel is the numbered part.
:)

Unless you're voluntarily registering your long guns, a 10/22 isn't registered.

A ruger charger on the other hand since it's a handgun, would be(and you'd have to get it via single shot exemption as I doubt it's on the roster, and a mag lock for it).

ojisan
04-01-2012, 2:55 PM
I believe we are splitting hairs here.
Rifles are not registered, I agree.
But to get a new receiver for a 10/22 rifle it does have to be DROSed, background check and 10 day wait....so it is not so easy to get receivers....this is what I was refering to.

A Ruger Charger, on the other hand, could be built from an 80% and not require registration unless it is sold. But this is not the 2A forum and we digress too much.

Merc1138
04-01-2012, 3:40 PM
If you want to bring up 80% builds, then you could do the same with a 10/22 rifle. No one mentioned 80%.

Someone mentioned 10/22 receivers being registered, and that is not correct. That's all there is to it. DROS is not registration either, and neither is a background check.

littlejake
04-01-2012, 4:06 PM
..."A ruger charger on the other hand since it's a handgun, would be(and you'd have to get it via single shot exemption as I doubt it's on the roster, and a mag lock for it)."

Doesn't the charger hit "fail" on the handgun AW flowchart at more than one point (both at step 16a)?

1)Detachable mag outside grip (OK -- fix the mag so it requires a tool for removal.)

2)The fore stock is essentially a barrel shroud?

Broso
04-01-2012, 4:20 PM
I initially started with a 10/22T and slowly started upgrading as I got more interested in customization but If I could do it again I would start with a receiver from Volquartsen or Tactical Solutions. With the amount of $ your are going to spend upgrading a Ruger your better off just building your own in my opinion.

Merc1138
04-01-2012, 4:44 PM
Doesn't the charger hit "fail" on the handgun AW flowchart at more than one point (both at step 16a)?

1)Detachable mag outside grip (OK -- fix the mag so it requires a tool for removal.)

2)The fore stock is essentially a barrel shroud?

1) yes.
2) cut it off

ojisan
04-01-2012, 4:50 PM
2)

But the no-forestock rule only replies if it is a detachable magazine.
That's why there are so many AR and AK pistols with mag-locks to remove them from AW status so barrel covers of one kind or another are OK.

Merc1138
04-01-2012, 4:52 PM
Oh yeah, guess that wouldn't matter since you'd need the magazine lock already anyway.

jbush
04-02-2012, 5:36 AM
I agree with ojisan, while a receiver is not registered it is drosed and contains the serial number unless you do an 80%. Either way the receiver will be one of the most expensive parts to replace, since there will be the cost of the receiver, transfer and dros fees, unless by some miracle a LGS has the aftermarket receiver you want. There are guys out there who will stone and polish a stock receiver. Check rimfirecentral.com. Since an aftermarket receiver will probably cost as much as an entire new gun, I would opt to build from parts. The rest is just what your budget can afford. Trigger groups and parts, bolts that have been reworked or custom bolts, barrels and stocks are all readily available and require no special handling.

10/22s can get real expensive to build. It's so easy to put 5 or 6 hundred or MORE into a 200 dollar rifle. I did a basic Boyds evolution stock, trigger work, bolt work, Beyer custom barrel and a scope a year or so back and its still one of my favorite rifles to shoot, and the big plus is, once you get passed the initial shock of what you spent on the rifle, ammo is cheap and you have a lot of fun for the money.