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View Full Version : '42 91/30 Izhevsk Question...


socalcustom
03-26-2012, 3:37 PM
Hey Guys, just picked up my first Mosin Nagant and noticed that it has matching numbers on the receiver, butt plate, bullet well, and bolt. Is there a way to tell if the stock is the original for the rifle? The stock does not have the "X" on it that I believe is indicative of a re-furb.

Bought this on a whim when Turner's was having a $99.98 sale on these rifles. Didn't expect it to have matching numbers and didn't think to look for it when I purchased. I only took a look for the condition of the rifle to still be in good, solid condition. From looking at re-finished stocks and a finished known as the "Elixir" I was planning to take this rifle apart and strip the stock to refinish to it's original finish, or something as close as possible. But, if this is a complete all matching original, I would be hesitant to do anything but clean off the cosmoline and fire her once in a while at the range.

Here's a pic of the receiver stamps. Also curious, is it common for the stamps to be doubled up?

http://i1094.photobucket.com/albums/i459/chrisgrizey/IMAG0513.jpg

sierra m37
03-26-2012, 3:49 PM
I have the same year and factory but it only has one year stamp. I hear it was not uncommon to re-match the serial nos. when they were rebuilt. Mine have matching serial numbers as well and picked It up a month ago. I think they ground off any mismatch numbers and just punched in new ones. My stock was in decent condition. The ammo patches ar date stamped 1960 and are not period correct. Neither is the oil bottle according to the little research I've done. Great rifle for $90 though! How can you go wrong.

Chaos47
03-26-2012, 3:52 PM
Its not rare but it is uncommon to have double stamps. Remember there where millions made.

Is the stock in that bad of condition?
Why do you think that its not in its original finish?
Shellac is the original finish for most of them

socalcustom
03-26-2012, 4:03 PM
Its not rare but it is uncommon to have double stamps. Remember there where millions made.

Is the stock in that bad of condition?
Why do you think that its not in its original finish?
Shellac is the original finish for most of them

Not that I don't think that it is the original finish on the stock, I was just wondering if you can tell if it is the original stock for the rifle. The stock is in decent to good condition from what i can tell about these rifles, but I'm a bit of a perfectionist and tinkerer so I was thinking of refinishing the stock to make it a little nicer. Just didn't want to ruin something that should not have been touched.

Thought matching numbers was a little more uncommon thing till reading sierra m37's response about them possibly restamping parts with the matching numbers. Looking at the square stamp in the dead center, I think that is a refurbishing stamp. Thanks for the responses, guys.

hypnoman
03-26-2012, 5:22 PM
Some collectors would say that if you refinish it you would ruin the collector's value on these. Congrats on your first Mosin . . . enjoy and give us a range report!!

TheExpertish
03-26-2012, 8:49 PM
Looks like a rushed wartime round reciever to me. The double date and Izhevsk stamp is kinda cool. Hope itshoots well. Post some pics of the stock. If you want/have a true wartime stock there won't be metal eyelets for the sling attachments.

rojocorsa
03-26-2012, 9:07 PM
You can tell if the stock is wartime by seeing how thick the wrist is...

Warrior King
03-26-2012, 10:27 PM
Your rifle was made the year German troops were deep in Russia and up until Stalingrad in the winter of 1942 were winning the war.

Forget about collector value. Why would you want to change the stock? Every blemish on that rife tells the story of one of the biggest most desperate struggles in human history.

mosinnagantm9130
03-26-2012, 11:02 PM
Nice one! Double date stamps happen, they aren't that common but don't add much to value. It's a cool oddity though.

You can tell if the stock is wartime by seeing how thick the wrist is...

As well as by looking at the sling slots. Can we get a full pic of the rifle OP?

Your rifle was made the year German troops were deep in Russia and up until Stalingrad in the winter of 1942 were winning the war.

Forget about collector value. Why would you want to change the stock? Every blemish on that rife tells the story of one of the biggest most desperate struggles in human history.

This, although it's possible the stock was made post-war.

rojocorsa
03-27-2012, 2:05 PM
Oh yeah, sling slots too. I took that one for granted...(and post war stocks have the same style (unless they're WWII ones with no metal edge at all)).

socalcustom
03-27-2012, 4:07 PM
Didn't take any pics of her before I put the pads on the butt end of the stock. *Not quite sure why I didn't.* But, there is no metal in the sling slot on the butt end of the stock, but there is a piece of metal on the just the bottom of the forend.

A an interesting side note, I completely stripped her down last night and came across almost no cosmoline whatsoever. Found a little comsoline in some of the threading, spring of the bayonet and on some of the wood, otherwise she was clean. Still took the time to soak all of the small parts in mineral spirits, rinse in hot soapy water and re-oil w/ Breakfree CLP. I purchased this one from a Turner's Outdoorsman in my area.

on to the pics that I do have of her, the other rifle in the shots is my old Savage -06.

http://i1094.photobucket.com/albums/i459/chrisgrizey/IMAG0514.jpg

http://i1094.photobucket.com/albums/i459/chrisgrizey/IMAG0520.jpg

http://i1094.photobucket.com/albums/i459/chrisgrizey/IMAG0519.jpg

http://i1094.photobucket.com/albums/i459/chrisgrizey/IMAG0518.jpg

http://i1094.photobucket.com/albums/i459/chrisgrizey/IMAG0522.jpg

ZDY328i
03-27-2012, 6:23 PM
Socal, What kind of cheek rest is that on your 91/30?

socalcustom
03-27-2012, 8:16 PM
Socal, What kind of cheek rest is that on your 91/30?

Two pieces that I got from Cabela's. Darkened the leather for the recoil pad with a lot of mink oil worked into it and added the brass grommets as it came with just holes punched into the leather. Laced up both using the leather lace that came with the cheek pad. Had to do a unique lace configuration to make it reach the whole length. Link listed below:

Triple K Leather Cheek Pad, 1/2" Rise-
http://www.cabelas.com/product/Triple-K-Leather-Cheek-Pad/706669.uts

Kick Killer Lace-Up Recoil Pad, Size X-Small -
http://www.cabelas.com/product/Kick-Killer-Lace-Up-Butt-Pad/734595.uts

mosinnagantm9130
03-27-2012, 11:26 PM
The stock is a wartime stock. It's correct for a 42 Izhevsk, but because of how stocks were swapped during the refurb process, it is probably not the original stock for that rifle.

Fate
03-28-2012, 10:41 PM
Nice looking refurb. I wouldn't mess with it.

As you might've figured out by now, the matching numbers aren't necessarily (or even likely) original to the rifle. New replacement parts were stamped to match during the refurb process in Ukraine.

WALDSCHRAT
03-30-2012, 1:14 AM
Of the millions of MNs manufactured, the 1942 Ishevsk was the most common. Now if you were to come across a 1941 Tula, that would be very special; $300 worth of special. Tula was surrounded on three sides by the Nazis in late `41. By then most of their tools and inventory had already been shipped east to Ishevsk in the Urals.

socalcustom
04-02-2012, 6:05 PM
Took her to the range yesterday, Piru, CA. Remarkable results for a 70 y/o rifle w/ iron sights. Spent most of the day on my aught six, but cracked off about 20 rounds with the 91/30. Easily tagging the metal at 100 yds and even at 200 yds. Great rifle, especially for $100.

However, I hate to upset the purist here, but I am going to refinish the stock. I know the stock can tell a tale of where this rifle has been, but this one doesn't have too much of a story to tell. The most I've been able to decipher from her is that she was refurbished, looks like all of the parts were stamped to match and the stock patched with a couple small pieces of wood here and then it was all put back together and stored for the last 70 years. So, I'm hoping to begin a whole new story for this rifle as a family heirloom that was hand finished by some great great great grandfather way back when.

Side note - this is the dirtiest piece of wood to ever try to clean off. Zip stripped off the shellac and stain, green scour pad w/ Krud Kutter to extract the grease and after fully washing her off in the shower and drying with a hair dryer there is still oil in the wood. I'll throw up a series of pics when she's done.