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View Full Version : My 1st Mosin 91/30 and C&R questions


mrmojo
03-18-2012, 7:44 PM
I just got my first Mosin-Nagant 91/30 rifle (round receiver, Izzie) bougth from Big 5. I spent this weekend removing the cosmoline and cleaning it but I still have a sticky bolt.

My first question is, does anyone know of any good gunsmiths in the East Bay (Concord, CA area) that I can take my Mosin to get safety-checked (headspace, etc.) and also have the sticy bolt fixed?

My next question is regarding the C&R license. I'm definately thinking about adding more surplus/C&R guns to my collection and I'm starting to read up on the process to get an C&R license but I haven't read anywhere about the step by step process that happens when I order a gun online.

Say I buy a C&R gun from an online distributor/importer. I know that I have to have my C&R license on file with them or send it to them before I order. Then once I order I've read that I can have the gun shipped to my house. Once the gun arrives I know that I have to log it into a hard-bound book to record it.

But my question is, am I still restricted to the 10-day wait period? If yes, how does that work? If I already have the gun shipped to my house do I have to take it to a gun shop to do the DROS on it and do they keep for the 10-day wait period? Or is there no need to do DROS and no 10-day wait period?

G-Man WC
03-18-2012, 8:18 PM
Congrats on the first. It won't be the last :D

I have mosin head space gauges and if you want to meet at USI one weekend, I'll do it for you in a few minutes. Send me a PM.

Sitcky bolt can be taken care of with a little elbow grease and a power drill.
http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinCleaning.htm
From 7.62x54.net
Sticky bolt syndrome is a term commonly used by Mosin Nagant shooters that actually refers to the cartridge case sticking inside the chamber making normal extraction difficult or even impossible. While a burr in the chamber can be the cause, this is uncommon and outside the scope of this article. Typically the problem is due to a dirty chamber and is aggravated by lacquer coated cartridge cases which are common among surplus Eastern Bloc 7.62x54r cartridges. However, it is not limited to lacquered cases and can be experienced with brass cases and to different extents with different varieties of lacquered cases. The problem often becomes worse the hotter the chamber is and a cold rifle might function fine and then lock up after five to ten shots, returning to normal after cooling off. Forcing extraction by hitting the bolt handle with a mallet is not recommended as it puts excessive strain on the extractor which can weaken it to the point that it eventually breaks. The case head can also separate leaving the body in the chamber requiring a case extraction tool to remove. The proper short term solution to removing a stuck fired case is to turn the rifle muzzle up and insert a cleaning rod down the bore. While firmly pulling on the bolt handle drop the rod from a height of about six inches above the rear of the cartridge case allowing it to bounce against it. Usually one to three tries will be sufficient to dislodge the case and open the bolt. At this point the firearm should not be fired until the underlying problem is corrected. The long term solution is to thoroughly clean the chamber removing any built up lacquer transferred from the cartridge cases while shooting or dried cosmoline or oil from storage. My preferred method is to use a short cleaning rod, such as a single section from the cheap three piece cleaning kits, with an oversized brush such as those designed for a 20 gauge or 12 gauge shotgun. Nylon brushes are suitable for this as they hold up better and the chamber walls are smooth rather than grooved. Wrap the brush with some deleading wool (see tools, supplies, solvents and oils above) and dip it in solvent such as Hoppe’s #9. Chuck the rod in a drill and run it at slow speed for 30 seconds to a minute while moving it forwards and backwards in the chamber. Swab out the chamber thoroughly with more solvent and repeat the process. Give the chamber a thorough final cleaning paying close attention to any fouling or pieces of brush or deleading wool that might have dislodged in the receiver or bore. The chamber should be left dry for shooting or lightly oiled for storage. In no circumstances should cartridges or the chamber itself be oiled to ease extraction. Friction between the case and chamber walls during powder ignition is an important part of the design of most firearms and reducing this can place undue strain on the bolt locking lugs leading to catastrophic failure and injury in extreme cases. Polishing compounds should not be used in the chamber as they are abrasive and designed to remove metal, even if only a small amount. Over time it may be necessary to repeat the cleaning procedure, especially if lacquered cases are used regularly. With experience the onset of the problem will be noticed before it becomes a serious issue and the cleaning can be done before a range session is interrupted. In extreme cases it may be necessary to switch to a different type of ammunition to completely resolve sticking cases. Proper lubrication of the bolt is also necessary for smooth operation and the combination of a slightly dirty chamber and a poorly oiled bolt can compound what would be a minor problem into a frustrating shooting experience.
-g

Lucky Scott
03-18-2012, 8:22 PM
Also, shoot it a few times and see if the sticky bolt gets better.

mrmojo
03-18-2012, 9:45 PM
Thank you for the info on the sticky bolt, I'll give that a try.

TheExpertish
03-18-2012, 11:57 PM
I just got my first Mosin-Nagant 91/30 rifle (round receiver, Izzie) bougth from Big 5. I spent this weekend removing the cosmoline and cleaning it but I still have a sticky bolt.

My first question is, does anyone know of any good gunsmiths in the East Bay (Concord, CA area) that I can take my Mosin to get safety-checked (headspace, etc.) and also have the sticy bolt fixed?

My next question is regarding the C&R license. I'm definately thinking about adding more surplus/C&R guns to my collection and I'm starting to read up on the process to get an C&R license but I haven't read anywhere about the step by step process that happens when I order a gun online.

Say I buy a C&R gun from an online distributor/importer. I know that I have to have my C&R license on file with them or send it to them before I order. Then once I order I've read that I can have the gun shipped to my house. Once the gun arrives I know that I have to log it into a hard-bound book to record it.

But my question is, am I still restricted to the 10-day wait period? If yes, how does that work? If I already have the gun shipped to my house do I have to take it to a gun shop to do the DROS on it and do they keep for the 10-day wait period? Or is there no need to do DROS and no 10-day wait period?

The 10 day wait ONLY applies if you're buying from a dealer IN California. If it's shipped to you, it's yours. Only exception is handguns which have to go through a dealer. All this changes if you get a COE from Cal DOJ.

Fate
03-19-2012, 4:56 PM
The above guys answered your questions. Welcome to C&R collecting and Soviet weaponry.

Please don't call it an Izzie. It's Izhevsk.

Sz7M9ZXCoMg

hypnoman
03-19-2012, 5:30 PM
Sorry Fate . . . I call it Izhevski until I forget . . . then "Izzy" slips out . . . I'll keep working on it . . .

joe_napz
03-22-2012, 8:25 AM
i just recently purchased a mosin. i was wondering, are the surplus spam cans legal to purchase in califronia? i wanted to buy some online but they are steel core i believe. is that conisdered an armor piercing round?

Quiet
03-22-2012, 8:34 AM
i was wondering, are the surplus spam cans legal to purchase in califronia? i wanted to buy some online but they are steel core i believe. is that conisdered an armor piercing round?
They are 100% CA legal.

Also...
Armor Piercing rifle cartridges are 100% CA legal.
CA only bans the possession of Armor Piercing handgun cartridges.

joe_napz
03-22-2012, 8:36 AM
thanks quiet, i appreciate it. i was about to get sad with trying to find ammo for my mosin.

paul0660
03-22-2012, 8:43 AM
Op, you have sticky bolt before firing it? That isn't what most call sticky bolt. sticky bolt is, after firing, it takes mega effort to operate the bolt and eject. That is to what G man refers. If you have not disassembled the bolt and cleaned it, and oil it, you should.

If yours is a Century import it is headspaced.

Call them whatever you want. Izzzzzzz is good enough for me.

TheExpertish
03-22-2012, 1:03 PM
Sorry Fate . . . I call it Izhevski until I forget . . . then "Izzy" slips out . . . I'll keep working on it . . .

Haha, it happens. Many collectors like to think we're better than the tacticool guys who have shottys, Mossys, and the like. I started a war over this when I was a newbie and got a few panties in a bind. It doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things, but you can impress more than a few people by saying it correctly.

rojocorsa
03-22-2012, 1:32 PM
Clean out the bolt and chamber as best as you can. Then oil the moving parts of the bolt. I find that after some use, the bolt gets better and "back to normal." It just needs to stretch its legs, if you will.


Generally you dont really need to worry about checking the headspace. At least I'm still alive and well. I know that 7.62x54R headspaces on the rim--and military rifles seem to be usually generally lenient about headspace by design (think about how many bolts and parts and stuff get mixed and matched)/

hypnoman
03-25-2012, 9:54 AM
Haha, it happens. Many collectors like to think we're better than the tacticool guys who have shottys, Mossys, and the like. I started a war over this when I was a newbie and got a few panties in a bind. It doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things, but you can impress more than a few people by saying it correctly.

Tell me about it . . . the "Izzy" slip of mine makes me feel no better than my buddies, love em, but I silently cringe when they call their Mosins "Nagant" I have given up trying to convince them "Nagant" is the revolver pistol. I believe the folks at Classice Arms still (erroneously) refers to the rifle as "Nagant" . . .