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04chase
03-17-2012, 10:44 PM
im a novice shooter at best and have a small collection of guns im starting to grow . (nothing special yet , hk usp 40 compact,rem 870 , desert eagle .44 mag/.50ae. and my new billet upper/lower ar-15 with spikes piston upper in 223. and its alot of fun and is what sparks my interest)

i am not reloading yet but will be doing reasearch on it and may jump on it soon .

i want to get into longer range shooting, 600-900 yds will probably be most of the time but id like to be able to go out to 1200-1500 yds on a great day .

ive noted im a noob so please help me out , if been steered towards .300 winchester, .308 , and possibly .30-06 . since they are all not over the top expensive for off the shelf ammo. however are the capable of my wants?

being new i do have the big penis big bore syndrome so naturally barrett has my eye (the .416 ) but after researching ammo i doubt ill go that route but not completely ruled out if i start reloading . (i like the m99 over the 82a1 for price and consistancy)

the round that really has my attention is the .338 lapua , expensive off the shelf but have been told reloading isnt too bad. so if i get to reloading (which will also help with reloading for the DE) i like this alot . the savage 110ba is definatly a nice rifle and i have held one and liked it alot .

so if anyone can enlighten me on other rounds to consider as well as the once i have mentioned , i have heard cheytec but havent looked into it either . im very open and not set on anything . budget isnt too big of a concern on rifle/glass but on ammo it will be .

also being from so cal finding somewhere near by isnt always real easy.

thanks for taking time to read this and please dont rape me to bad .

brando
03-18-2012, 1:18 AM
Get a basic .308WIN and a decent scope - combo should cost between $2000-3000. Next, and this is critical, take a Precision Rifle class. Even two days of instruction will save you a year a frustration learning to how use a scope, read the wind and estimate range. Then practice - often!

diego-ted
03-18-2012, 7:11 AM
Brando gives good advice! Although I think you can get into a rig with scope for a lot less than 2-3K that will out shoot you for many moons? That being said if $$ are not an issue the sky is the limit. You will hear there are many other choices for long range that are better then the 308 and I have bitten into that pie;however, I think everyone shoud own a 308!! LOL

ADAM
03-18-2012, 7:55 AM
spend some time here you will learn what not to do
http://www.caprc.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=35
http://www.caprc.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=34

Fjold
03-18-2012, 8:12 AM
The money that it takes to shoot to 1500 yards is being wasted while learning to shoot out to 1,000 yards.

Since you haven't much experience with any kind of precision shooting I would recommend a heavy barreled (24"-26") 308 Win, since you're not reloading.

Hook up with local F class shooters, the CAPRC, Pendleton, Cuyama or Coalinga groups and get some trigger time. About the time that you get to where you are shooting well enough to question your equipment choices, you'll be ready to spend the money on the reloading equipment needed.

ubet
03-18-2012, 8:35 AM
With a novice shooter, generally speaking recoil is an issue. For your first rifle stay away from the 338lapua, 416barrety, 408cheytac, even a 300win mag. I would suggest getting a rem 700 5r in 308, or the savage ba/t in 308. The 308 is a great cartridge to start on, because their is a wealth of information, loads, bullets, cases and data for it. Its a low recoil gun that wont break the pocket book to shoot. The next best thing about the 308, IT WILL FORCE YOU TO LEARN TO READ WIND! Due to their slower speed, and big trajectory they are influenced by wind (which to learn is a good thing) part of this is due to their lower bc.

My nest suggestion is a 260rem. It shoots like a laser, light recoil, easy on new shooters. You will have to reload for this though. I would suggest buying a rifle in 308win, shoot the barrel out, then just have a smith put a 260rem barrel on the action and you are good to go.

If you want to get into precision shooting, you are going to have to reload to do it cost effectively, and to build match grade ammo, no other way around it. Get a GOOD setup, do it now, and build loads taylored to your stick.

Glass, lots of options. I have a vortex viper pst, its a good scope cost was about $900. If money is no issue, its the least I would start with. What I personally like is 6-24 powers, with moa/moa (moa turrets, moa reticle). If you go mils, just make sure you get mil/mil, not moa/mil. The reason is, if you spot your miss, you can make corrections for it with your turrets without doing math, IE, youare 4.5moa low in your reticle, dial 4.5 on your turret, good to go. Personally I like ffp (first focal plane), the image stays the same size to the reticle when you zoom in or out. Where as a sfp (second focal plane) the image gets bigger while the reticle stays the same size. On a ffp, your dots/hash marks etc, are always the same distance between each other, because when you zoom in/out it gets bigger with the image in your scope. This allows you to "mil" a target on any x, correct for misses on any x without doing math (streamlined is best ALWAYS). The sfp, you can only "mil" your target on a certain x, usually the highest, and as anyone knows thats shot long range, when humidity is high your are screwed on 24x to see anything. A sfp scope will make you do A LOT more math in your head on the fly where a ffp, you can shoot and correct a lot quicker.

Scope brands I would recommend vortex pst, nightforce, uso, schmidt and bender and hendsoldt. The last 4 being top tier glass you are going to deffinetly pay for. The pst is a good scope for the price, the glass isnt great but you damn sure can see with it, mine tracks reliable, and always holds zero. Its got enough moa in the scope to get to 1k +. Their are other scope brands out there and probably some good ones, but those are the most renowned for "tactical" long range.

Then like said above, if money isnt an issue, I would recommend going to Rifles Only in Kingsville, Tx.

A good sight to look and read on is the forum at snipershide.com, a ton of knowledge and good shooters there. They have an online training to, that is $10/mth that is well worth it.

One more quick note, rings and bases. Get good ones, badger ordnance or nightforce are two I have used and recommend (their are others that are damn good, names arent coming to me right now). Their is no reason to strap a $1k+ scope onto a $1k+ rifle, with $30> rings/bases. Spend the money, get good rings and bases you will thank yourself without knowing it. Crappy rings and bases wont hold your scope tight, and arent machined precisely especially if you want to go to 1kyds.

Another word on rifles, dont spend $3k on your first precision rifle. Buy one $1k- 1.5k find out what you like in it, dont like in it. If its in 308win, you will have 8k+ rounds down the barrel before you wear the barrel out, and will have a damned good idea of what you want and dont want in a rifle. You can always buy and sell stocks and try new things on the same rifle.

Good luck.

tzotzo
03-18-2012, 8:57 AM
you can take certain precision rifle classes in which they rent you a rifle, say a Rem 700P, and then you can get a feel for what it's like to shoot out to 1000 with the eqpt they give you. Fwiw, I couldn't hit 200 yds before I took my first 2 day precision rifle class, but by the end of the 2nd day, I was hitting the 900 yd target most of the time, learning about wind at the same time.

I'd say if you think you are really gonna be in this sport, then get a 700P, which shoots great out of the box, put Badger Pic rail and rings on it, and a 3-10X Leupold Mark 4, Mil/Mil scope. You can have it accurized for another $100-200.

rksimple
03-18-2012, 9:57 AM
If rifles like the Barret are in your price range, you'd be best served by getting something like a Remington 700p topped with a Nightforce. Use the rest of your money to get set up reloading. Learning how to reload well is going to help you understand everything a little better about how the rifle works. Then take a precision rifle class. A lot can be learned from reading and researching online as well, but having one on one instruction will save a lot of headache. I run some LR precision/competition rifle "instructionals" from time to time for individuals and small groups, so when it comes time, feel free to drop me a line.

ubet
03-18-2012, 10:08 AM
I have to disagree with the above two, stay away from the p line. If Barrets are in your price range, go the 5r route, better stock, better trigger, better barrel.

707electrician
03-18-2012, 10:13 AM
I also say start out with a .308 and save some money while learning and get into reloading, rebarrel the rifle for .260 and get a decent scope

rksimple
03-18-2012, 10:21 AM
I have to disagree with the above two, stay away from the p line. If Barrets are in your price range, go the 5r route, better stock, better trigger, better barrel.

Both have HS stocks, the triggers between the 2 are both going to suck and need tuning, and though the barrel has 5r rifling, its still a factory barrel. Feel free to waste money on things that don't matter.

You may be thinking of the sps line...

707electrician
03-18-2012, 10:25 AM
The 5r has the bell and carlson a5 stock

CSACANNONEER
03-18-2012, 10:26 AM
I have to disagree with the above two, stay away from the p line. If Barrets are in your price range, go the 5r route, better stock, better trigger, better barrel.

I will strongly disagree with getting a Barrett. There are far better precision big bore guns out there for far less money. There are reasons that you do not see Barretts winning or even coming close to placing at FCSA matches.

Personally, I would suggest that the OP starts with a decent .22lr, good glass and higher end ammo. Learning to shoot a .22lr (read the wind, etc.) at 100-200 yards will save thousands of dollars and still give one quality trigger time while they learn how to play the game.

If the OP really wants to go big, there are some awesome .50 cal guns around that will outshoot a Barrett any day and cost a lot less. Most 50 manufacturers will chamber thier products in .510 DTC. I do know a couple 07FFLs who are looking into bringing in DTC chambered AR50. Of course, for the cost of a Barrett, one can have a great custom gun built on a Mc Bro's, Mauser or BAT action. Or, one can look into production rifles like: Bluegrass Armory, Noreen, State Arms, etc. or, AR15 uppers from ALS, Spider Firearms, Tactilte, etc.

That said, I still think the rimfire route is the best place to start followed by a decent .308. Then, after learning a little about the game and precision reloading, one can move over to other calibers.

Calplinker
03-18-2012, 11:05 AM
OP, I was in the same situation as you recently and after doing a lot of reading, decided on a Savage FCP-K in .308 bolt gun topped by a SWFA SS 5-20 FFP scope with MIL/MIL turrets. Combined, this comes in around $2500 with high quality scope rings, 20 MOA base, Harris bi-pod and a 9 round detachable magazine for it.

I chose .308 as it is a great "starter" round, particularly for someone who has no time or desire to reload such as myself. There is LOTS of high quality match ammo being made and finding one that my gun prefers shouldn't be all that difficult.

My local store had a Remington 5R, which I also liked, but what turned me to the Savage was a variety of things. Among them, the 4" longer barrel, which will keep a .308 supersonic a bit longer, the barrel fluting and muzzle break on the Savage and most of all the fantastic Accutrigger.

These things are very subjective, but I just didn't like the trigger at all on the Remington and the Accutrigger felt very crisp and clean with a break that must be less than 2 pounds. It is adjustable for less, but to me it feels perfect as is. I've read very well written opinions by others who feel the exact opposite about the Remington and Savage triggers, so as I said, these things are subjective.

Savage's also come with detachable box magazines (DBM) standard, unlike the Remington and you can buy 9 or 10 round magazines from them from a couple of sources. Very convenient to have and it doesn't require changing out the entire lower trigger guard area and installing an aftermarket DBM system.

I'm awaiting my scope base, but have everything else, so once installed I'll take it out and sight it in at 100 yards, then get to experimenting with ammo.

In the meantime, read up on how to use a scope. I chose a MIL setup over MOA and after doing some reading, it really isn't all that difficult. I found this article to be excellent and provides and understanding of the basis of MIL/MOA and how to use them.

http://mil-dot.com/Content%20Images/The_Derivation_of_the_Range_Estimation_Equations.p df

I'm a visual guy and when I read the section with the pie chart on page 3 it just "clicked". Pretty simple really.

Hard part of course is to put all this into practice. I've signed up for a 2 day long range shooting class later this year and in the mean time plan on joining a bunch of locals who regularly shoot at a 600 yard range near my home. I imagine I'll learn a lot from them.

Good luck with whatever you choose and while you'll read and hear lots of opinions, just remember that there are a WHOLE LOT of excellent choices out there, so it's hard to go wrong. Just about any quality, modern rifle will outshoot most drivers, so training and practice are arguably more important than equipment choices.

Hope this helps.

osis32
03-18-2012, 11:23 AM
I've been looking at doing some long range. Have my eye on the savage 110 ba in .300 win mag. I can't afford .338 lapua nor do I have room for reloading equipment. I shoot ars quite a bit so it would be a familiar feel. Lots of options though. If you're lucky some nice cal gunners might let you try their rigs out. It's all about personal feel and preference. Try as many as you can if you can.

Black Majik
03-18-2012, 12:10 PM
I've been looking at doing some long range. Have my eye on the savage 110 ba in .300 win mag. I can't afford .338 lapua nor do I have room for reloading equipment. I shoot ars quite a bit so it would be a familiar feel. Lots of options though. If you're lucky some nice cal gunners might let you try their rigs out. It's all about personal feel and preference. Try as many as you can if you can.

I would sway away from a .300WM if you aren't reloading and getting in the LR stuff. You're looking at $50 a box of 20 FGMM 190 SMK and a steeper learning curve.

osis32
03-18-2012, 12:39 PM
I'd target pay $2.50 a round over $5.00+ for lapua. I have an lr308 to practice up to 800 yards

RuggedJay
03-18-2012, 12:45 PM
Honest advice, don't get into long range rifle shooting. Its a waste of time and money. And the people that do it are *****s and don't like helping newbies.

ubet
03-18-2012, 12:49 PM
I will strongly disagree with getting a Barrett. There are far better precision big bore guns out there for far less money. There are reasons that you do not see Barretts winning or even coming close to placing at FCSA matches.

Personally, I would suggest that the OP starts with a decent .22lr, good glass and higher end ammo. Learning to shoot a .22lr (read the wind, etc.) at 100-200 yards will save thousands of dollars and still give one quality trigger time while they learn how to play the game.

If the OP really wants to go big, there are some awesome .50 cal guns around that will outshoot a Barrett any day and cost a lot less. Most 50 manufacturers will chamber thier products in .510 DTC. I do know a couple 07FFLs who are looking into bringing in DTC chambered AR50. Of course, for the cost of a Barrett, one can have a great custom gun built on a Mc Bro's, Mauser or BAT action. Or, one can look into production rifles like: Bluegrass Armory, Noreen, State Arms, etc. or, AR15 uppers from ALS, Spider Firearms, Tactilte, etc.

That said, I still think the rimfire route is the best place to start followed by a decent .308. Then, after learning a little about the game and precision reloading, one can move over to other calibers.

I was not promoting the Barrrett, just if he HAD the money for one, not to buy one. My post you quoted isnt real clear, I dont think.

As far as the savage/remington debate goes at the entry level gun, you get more for the money in the savage. Their is something to 5r rifling, the 5r I have is insanely accurate in fact it did this at 500yds.
http://i381.photobucket.com/albums/oo260/300wsm_2008/IMAG0040-1.jpg Thats a 308 case I am holding, 5 shot group, will it ever happen again, probably not, but it happened once. Its an easy .5moa gun.

I have shot and owned savage, good guns, bad triggers, worse stocks. The 5r I have, good stock, good barrel, good action, decent trigger. Best thing is to molest as many as you can, but just chose one and shoot it. The 22lr is a good route to get started.

One thing to remember, entry level guns are usually just donor actions, keep that in mind and buy better if you dont know what you want.

milotrain
03-18-2012, 12:58 PM
The money that it takes to shoot to 1500 yards is being wasted while learning to shoot out to 1,000 yards.

Since you haven't much experience with any kind of precision shooting I would recommend a heavy barreled (24"-26") 308 Win, since you're not reloading.

Hook up with local F class shooters, the CAPRC, Pendleton, Cuyama or Coalinga groups and get some trigger time. About the time that you get to where you are shooting well enough to question your equipment choices, you'll be ready to spend the money on the reloading equipment needed.

This 10000%. You can win a match with .308 no problem if you know how to shoot. You learn how to shoot with cheap stuff then you start buying the last few points. You will never be able to buy the quantity of points that you can train. Think of it this way: in highpower a new shooter starts out somewhere around 75% accuracy with an off the shelf AR in service spec. He learns to shoot a bit and jumps to 80%, reloads and jumps to 85%. Now you are stuck at 85% forever, there is no gear you can buy to get you passed 85%, everything above that is skill and everyone who shoots highpower is way above 85% unless they are new.

Find a group that shoots what you want to shoot (but at shorter range) and hang out with them. Shoot their matches, and get in a lot of trigger time. Matches will teach you how to get better and let you track progress, you don't have to be competitive it's just a way to keep track of how you are doing. By the time equipment is a limitation you'll know exactly what you want to spend money on.

1. Bushnell elite fixed power 10x scope
2. Whatever flavor of .308 suits you with half the rest of your budget
3. As much Black Hills remanufactured .308 match ammo as you can buy with the other half of your remaining budget. (eventually you must reload)

RuggedJay
03-18-2012, 1:03 PM
Which gun do the gunsmiths in your area work on?
Probably a 700.

Rockit
03-18-2012, 1:09 PM
II would suggest that the OP starts with a decent .22lr, good glass and higher end ammo. Learning to shoot a .22lr (read the wind, etc.) at 100-200 yards will save thousands of dollars and still give one quality trigger time while they learn how to play the game.
What would you suggest?

Iloveguns
03-18-2012, 1:17 PM
Honest advice, don't get into long range rifle shooting. Its a waste of time and money. And the people that do it are *****s and don't like helping newbies.

^^^

Seriously!! If you think you can do this sport for cheap just wait till you get into it! Also the guys are *****s! Not sure if I am one of them or not!!

milotrain
03-18-2012, 1:33 PM
CZ452 is a good, very accurate cheap .22lr. You can learn a whole lot about shooting with it. But it's best to really figure out what you want to do ultimately and how badly you want to do it. If you want a long range toy then just buy one. If you want to really shoot well at long range then you need to learn first how to shoot well at short range. It's sort of like racing cars. A lot of people buy a fast car but can't drive it worth poop. Most really good drivers in this country drive Miatas on the track before they ever go to a high HP car.

Do you want a Porsche or do you want to learn to drive?

707electrician
03-18-2012, 2:20 PM
Honest advice, don't get into long range rifle shooting. Its a waste of time and money. And the people that do it are *****s and don't like helping newbies.

Maybe where you are from, the long range guys I have shot with are helpful. It's all a waste of money, you just have to decide how much you want to waste

50deuce
03-18-2012, 2:23 PM
For your needs (OP), I'd recommend to stay away from .338. Don't get me wrong, it's a great system and all, but ammo will put a hole in your pocket.

To help you narrow down the caliper that fits your needs, look into the projectile max effective range, supersonic, and subsonic number. That should help you on your distant goal. In short, I find that .300 WM has the furthest max effective range of the three caliper you listed. Followed by 30-06 (2nd of the 3) and 308.

As for scope, I'd recommend a NightForce 5.5-22X50 or 5.5-22X56. It's a bit pricey but one hella scope, can take a lot of beating.

Next learn the calculation and conversion for the distant, windage, angle, elevation, etc. Or you can get the gadget that will do all that for you.

There's many more stuff (accountability, fundamental, consistency etc.) for shooting long range.

russ69
03-18-2012, 2:43 PM
I didn't read all the posts but I think you can break this down fairly easily. If you are new to rifle shooting and especially long range shooting there are really just two choices. A 308 bolt gun or a 1/7 or 1/8 twist AR-15. Both guns offer the same challenge, velocity vs bullet choice/weight. Getting to 1000 yards and reading the wind.
Learn to shoot those first. Then learn to load for them. Then you can move on to the 6.5mm or other cartridges. You have to know your sight settings for 1000 yards so it really doesn't matter if you are dialing in 26 feet of drop or 30 feet of drop, you still have know your settings. The 308 and the 223 will give you a good base to build from.

milotrain
03-18-2012, 2:46 PM
The people who shoot seriously are all very helpful folks who want to see their sport grow and want to see you get excited about shooting the way that they did when they first started. They will bend over backwards to help you out.

alfred1222
03-18-2012, 3:04 PM
So i agree with all of the above posts. start with a .308, and go from their. i dont have a 700, i shoot a marlin XS7, but i think that the best thing you could do as a novice shooter is to stick with something that you can shoot. i get the urge to buy a huge bore rifle is intense, but when youre shooting long distances, not only does the gun and glass matter, but your own technique as a shooter matters. if you develop a flinch from shooting those larger rifles, it could create a problem that will take a lot of time to correct. it is easier to work your way up to the larger calibers, trust me. with that said, a good .308 rifle, and a really good long range scope will get u set up for the range, and than spend the rest on reloading equipment. it wasnt until i got a buddies reloaded match grade ammo that i really saw what my rifle could do. thats what made me want to get into reloading myself.

NYsteveZ
03-18-2012, 3:22 PM
I see the Rem 700 being a big hit for starters. What Kind of scopes are recommended? Also, what about a military style rifle like the PSL? Im sure it is not nearly as accurate, nor have the reach of a 308, but I could be wrong. (flame suit on for recommending a commie gun)

RuggedJay
03-18-2012, 3:31 PM
I see the Rem 700 being a big hit for starters. What Kind of scopes are recommended? Also, what about a military style rifle like the PSL? Im sure it is not nearly as accurate, nor have the reach of a 308, but I could be wrong. (flame suit on for recommending a commie gun)

PSL can't compare to a bolt gun with match ammo. PSL was designed to shoot people COM not punch sub moa holes in paper.

RuggedJay
03-18-2012, 3:33 PM
The people who shoot seriously are all very helpful folks who want to see their sport grow and want to see you get excited about shooting the way that they did when they first started. They will bend over backwards to help you out.

This is a huge generalization. Believe me when I say there are more *****s in precision rifle than other shooting sports.

osis32
03-18-2012, 3:35 PM
I see the Rem 700 being a big hit for starters. What Kind of scopes are recommended? Also, what about a military style rifle like the PSL? Im sure it is not nearly as accurate, nor have the reach of a 308, but I could be wrong. (flame suit on for recommending a commie gun)

it should have the reach of .308. its basically a cross between .308 and 30-06. you look at a picture of the three and its almost right in between the other two.

phish
03-18-2012, 3:39 PM
This is a huge generalization. Believe me when I say there are more *****s in precision rifle than other shooting sports.

lol, u mad bro?

NYsteveZ
03-18-2012, 3:53 PM
PSL can't compare to a bolt gun with match ammo. PSL was designed to shoot people COM not punch sub moa holes in paper.

:43: Good! Anyway, I guess I have to start looking into a Rem 700 to fill that sub moa void. Leupold scopes are nice too, and I have to do my research on them.

osis32
03-18-2012, 4:20 PM
http://www.waffeninfo.net/munition/vergleich_3.jpg


This illustrates what I was talking about nystevez

milotrain
03-18-2012, 4:23 PM
This is a huge generalization. Believe me when I say there are more *****s in precision rifle than other shooting sports.

Alright fine. I'll rephrase.

All the people I have met who shoot seriously are very helpful. We don't all agree on politics, we don't all agree on economics, and we don't all agree on everything. We don't have happy fun cuddly time after shooting but do help each other out and I've been loaned more quality gear with no expectation whatsoever from this group. In my experience they go out of their way to make you feel welcome and to help you. Maybe we have different experiences.

"believe me when I say..."
Why think this way and why try to get other's to think this way? It's like saying, "Boy I'm depressed that one day I'm going to die, you should be worried too. Believe me when I say that one day you will die." Well great, that's helpful. How about instead just go out and get **** done?

NYsteveZ
03-19-2012, 3:51 PM
Thanks Osis, thats a good pic. Also, thanks for everyones info, even if it wasnt towards me, I learned alot for when I get into long range...one day :D

ExtremeX
03-19-2012, 4:41 PM
The best advise I can give you is take the time to learn everything you can about ballistics. And it sure helps doing it on a cheaper caliber.


I never took a class or received instruction... I bought a rifle on a budget, I picked an affordable cartridge, I found the best tactical scope I could afford at the time with raised turrets, and I played with ballistic calculators, drop charts, and experiment until I understood and got it right.


Buying the right tools of the trade will help you a lot in your venture... spotting scope, range finder, even free drop charts or paid software. Federal has a version for free on their website, that's what I started with just to understand how wind, sight height, loadings, all that stuff effect POI. Even if its not just for long range shooting... now that I understand it all I used that software to find optimal zero for my other rifles which might have a RDS for example.


Someone could tell me all day how to shoot long range, but none of it mattered to me until I started getting some trigger time and my own fingers adjusting the scope.

And start small... if you cant make groups at 100 yards, then ur gona have a bad time at 1000 yards. All the top shelf stuff in the world isn't going to save you if you just simply have crappy marksmanship skills.

killshot44
03-19-2012, 5:13 PM
Someone could tell me all day how to shoot long range, but none of it mattered to me until I started getting some trigger time and my own fingers adjusting the scope.

And THAT is why there's a post EVERY MONTH inviting folks to come up to Sac Valley and shoot on the 1K Range.
Not a single new guy came this month. :facepalm:

On April 15th there's a 3x600 match so..........start your excuses.

ExtremeX
03-19-2012, 5:43 PM
killshot44,

I agree, and opportunity like that could present more to learn over a day at the range than a month of reading how to shoot on a forum.

707electrician
03-19-2012, 5:45 PM
And THAT is why there's a post EVERY MONTH inviting folks to come up to Sac Valley and shoot on the 1K Range.
Not a single new guy came this month. :facepalm:

On April 15th there's a 3x600 match so..........start your excuses.

You recognized every face that showed up to that full parking lot as someone who has shot in one of the matches previously?

alfred1222
03-19-2012, 5:52 PM
And THAT is why there's a post EVERY MONTH inviting folks to come up to Sac Valley and shoot on the 1K Range.
Not a single new guy came this month. :facepalm:

On April 15th there's a 3x600 match so..........start your excuses.

Can you PM me details about this match??

milotrain
03-19-2012, 6:20 PM
A 3x600 will get you so much training time it's stupid. There is nothing better if you plan on only shooting prone. Play this game frequently and You'll be shooting accurately at long range very soon.

707electrician
03-19-2012, 6:31 PM
Alfred, I PM'd you the details. While Saturdays RMC 80 is mostly for the service rifle and match rifle guys and will be shot in different positions, you can still bring your scoped bolt rifle or scoped AR and shoot it all prone if you want, your scores just wont count toward any prizes or ranking and of course Sundays match is a 3x600 which is all prone and all at 600 yards

MARVIN GARDENS
03-21-2012, 9:47 PM
Is there a match at Cuyama? I've got a Palma rifle but have never fired it.

Thanks.

Bob

berg
03-19-2013, 4:16 PM
04chase, I see you ended up with the .50 DTC. How are you liking long range shooting? http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=568357

phish
03-19-2013, 7:06 PM
nice necro post

I also like how he just blew off all the sound advice given :/

fonzy
03-19-2013, 9:18 PM
http://www.youtube.com/user/TiborasaurusRex

Has a whole video series. I learned alot just from listening. Didn't even know some things existed like correolas or however you spell it. I would like to eventually shoot long distance. But I'll be honest..IM CHEAP. I'll will pretty much buy a rifle I'm eyeballing the savage or remington 700 sps. .308. Buy a scope ( I can assure you it won't be near a grand). Then just practice and try to get the best I can.

Right now I have a Savage fv sr. Trying to get the fundementals down. Rangefinding, moa conversions spinning turrets and doing the math. All this is fun shooting and actually hitting is the icing on the cake.

ar15barrels
03-21-2013, 2:28 AM
lol, u mad bro?

I'm pretty sure it's a case of "takes one to know one".
Thats why you and I don't know many *****s and why he DOES...

ar15barrels
03-21-2013, 2:34 AM
Is there a match at Cuyama?
I've got a Palma rifle but have never fired it.

This weekend should be the Palma Match at Cuyama.
Email myke155 at yahoo.com for full details.