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View Full Version : Dumb Question #363B: Electronic Sight?


Nihonto Chicken
03-17-2012, 5:28 PM
Modern optical sights are pretty impressive, but when putting a $1500 piece of glass on a $800 rifle, one has to consider whether a new technology might be in order. I get the feeling akin to old mechanical carburetors versus modern fuel injection.

Isn't it about time that there appears an electronic rifle sight using a photo receptor and viewing screen, similar in concept to a video camera or digital still camera? Good sensors can be better at low light than a reasonably sized standard optic, and might even approach night vision capability. Such a scope could be programmed in advance, perhaps by an external device, to provide ranging assistance, and could be customized to any rifle and load. An essentially infinite number of different sighting patterns (crosshairs, posts, etc.) could be readily available, even a customer designed pattern could perhaps be incorporated. Image brightness could be easily adjusted by the user. There would be a minimum of shock sensitive glass, just a simple imaging lens system for the photoreceptor and another at the other end to make the viewing screen focus at infinity for the user's eye. Magnification, image brightness, sighting pattern, target zero, etc. could all be electronic, doing away with all the current scope mechanics that have to be both extremely precise and shock resistant (hence, quite costly). Yes, the shock resistance of an electronic scope would have to beefed up over that of a simple camera, but this has to be easier than what's now needed for the complex mechanical scopes now in use. And an electronic unit might also be connected to a video recorder if desired, or possibly even have internal recording capability.

Seems to me that with the current technology available, a good example of this would cost a modest fraction of the old mechanical optic it would replace. Am I missing something here? If not, why is not such a scope available now??? :confused:

Twystd1
03-17-2012, 5:33 PM
They already make them.... Very heavy. And VERY pricey.

T

billped
03-17-2012, 5:54 PM
Haven't you seen Predators?

http://www.amazon.com/Elcan-Optical-DigitalHunter-Rifle-Scope/dp/B000HIS2JQ

Nihonto Chicken
03-17-2012, 8:18 PM
They already make them.... Very heavy. And VERY pricey.

Haven't you seen Predators?

http://www.amazon.com/Elcan-Optical-DigitalHunter-Rifle-Scope/dp/B000HIS2JQ

Sorry, haven't been aware at what's happening at the fringe. The available electronic models being inordinately heavy and overpriced, there obviously hasn't been a competent attempt made as of yet. I imagine the big league scope makers are complacent in selling their SOS. Sooner or later, a hungry little league company will come up with a decent product and eat their lunch. OTW prediction, in five years, maybe ten, current glass mechanical scopes will be an anachronistic relic of the past, along with the carburetor and film camera. I'm just amazed that some company with bright, young techies hasn't begun to sew this up already. That is all, back to lurk mode. ;)

chead
03-17-2012, 8:20 PM
Digital image processing is pretty hardware-intensive, and I would suspect that a lot of these digital optics aren't using the best hardware for the job. Once they get their act together, I'm in for one.

Nihonto Chicken
03-17-2012, 8:52 PM
Digital image processing is pretty hardware-intensive, and I would suspect that a lot of these digital optics aren't using the best hardware for the job. Once they get their act together, I'm in for one.

Appreciate your comment. I'm not a geek, and so have to unfortunately argue from a position of relative tech ignorance, my contention only based on what I see from an uninformed user standpoint (but with an old world technical degree ;)). A few months ago I finally broke down and bought a digital point and shoot camera, a Canon SD1400IS, now already way obsolete. So the same or similar technology in this camera can't be incorporated into a rifle scope weighing less than a few pounds? Gimme an effing break. Y'know, if a really competent digital gun scope were to be marketed, would it be legal here in the PRK? I mean, it would have such low light sensitivity that would make it potentially a "night scope" and illegal for mounting on a firearm in the People's Republik. Just amazing to me that the digital revolution has so ignored firearm scopes. Oh, well.

five.five-six
03-17-2012, 11:07 PM
Appreciate your comment. I'm not a geek, and so have to unfortunately argue from a position of relative tech ignorance, my contention only based on what I see from an uninformed user standpoint (but with an old world technical degree ;)). A few months ago I finally broke down and bought a digital point and shoot camera, a Canon SD1400IS, now already way obsolete. So the same or similar technology in this camera can't be incorporated into a rifle scope weighing less than a few pounds? Gimme an effing break. Y'know, if a really competent digital gun scope were to be marketed, would it be legal here in the PRK? I mean, it would have such low light sensitivity that would make it potentially a "night scope" and illegal for mounting on a firearm in the People's Republik. Just amazing to me that the digital revolution has so ignored firearm scopes. Oh, well.


Here is an idea, clamp your point and shoot camera on to your gun barrel and fire a few rounds, then get back to us on how well canon stands behind their warranty when every single part inside your camera is broken. You are comparing apples and oranges

Nihonto Chicken
03-18-2012, 7:36 PM
Here is an idea, clamp your point and shoot camera on to your gun barrel and fire a few rounds, then get back to us on how well canon stands behind their warranty when every single part inside your camera is broken. You are comparing apples and oranges

Yes, a common digital camera would fare about as well as would doing the same thing with a pair of binoculars or a spotting scope, which, according to your logic, means that mechanical optics systems cannot be made to work on firearms. Sheesh. I give up.

cabinetguy
03-18-2012, 9:34 PM
the tech is there, but it the price to make it worthwhile. It is not as cheap as strapping on a camera, and there are a few cameras that could take the recoil of modest calibers, its more of putting it in a package, and getting gov approval, as that would not be something to fall into outside hands

G60
03-18-2012, 10:11 PM
You'd still require good glass to get acceptable results from such a system.

This is why, even with the advancements in DSLR technology over the last few years, lenses can still cost upwards of $10,000 in extreme situations.

You can have the finest sensors in the world, but it doesn't mean anything without good glass in front of it.

five.five-six
03-20-2012, 9:56 PM
Yes, a common digital camera would fare about as well as would doing the same thing with a pair of binoculars or a spotting scope, which, according to your logic, means that mechanical optics systems cannot be made to work on firearms. Sheesh. I give up.

try clamping a spotting scope or binoculars to your rifle and see how they hold up. by your logic UTG and NcStar scopes hold a zero just as well as niteforce and Leopold


sheesh, I give up



ETA, do you have a NcStar scope on your unfired AR?

Short Action Precision
03-21-2012, 10:21 AM
OTW prediction, in five years, maybe ten, current glass mechanical scopes will be an anachronistic relic of the past

Just like old fashion Iron sight right???? Who needs those relics!!