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fiveflat
04-12-2007, 2:08 PM
Could someone give me a rundown on these types of scopes? Why are they only 1X magnification? Why are folks spending more on these 1X red dots instead of a nice variable power rifle scope?

proraptor
04-12-2007, 2:29 PM
People buy them cause they are tacti-cool.....

Prc329
04-12-2007, 2:41 PM
They way I see them is more for close quarters. putting the red dot on your target can give you a faster target acquisition time then the iron sights. At least they do for me. I also can not use my iron sights with both eyes open. I am pretty sure someone can, I can't. The red dot allows me to keep both eyes open and not need to have my head buried into the but stock and still make an accurate shot. That is assuming your red dot is properly zeroed.

randy
04-12-2007, 2:43 PM
They are quick on close up shots and work out to whatever distance you can see a target. They cost about the same as a low end quality scope.

Builder
04-12-2007, 2:55 PM
This has some info of how they work. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_dot_sight
Red dot sights use refractive or reflective optics to generate a collimated image of a luminous or reflective reticle. This collimated image appears to be projected out to a point at infinity, which makes the image of the reticle appear to the user to be projected onto the target.
The most well-known feature of red dot sights is that some, but not all, compensate for the parallax created when the shooter's head moves in relation to the sight. In other words, the dot will point close to the actual point of projected impact even when viewed at an angle.
However, parallax compensation is not perfect. Depending on sight quality, the range to the target and the magnitude of angle at which it is looked into, aiming error can be significantWith both eyes open, the image of the dot was superimposed by the brain onto the target. Nearly all currently available red dot sights use a curved partially reflective glass as a lens. This lens allows light from the target to pass through unobstructed, but collimates and reflects the light of the reticle back to the shooter's eye, thus allowing for one- or two-eyed aiming.
Modern red dot sights generally fall into two categories, full tube or open designs. Full tube sights look similar to a standard telescopic sight, with a cylindrical tube containing the optics. Since a red dot only really needs a single reflective surface, however, the tube is not needed. Many current designs consist of a flat base, with a single loop of material to support the reflective surface. While some argue that the open design gives the shooter a wider field of view, the actual viewable range of the dot is no larger than a full tube sight.
Thanks for the question, I learned something today.
Builder

Technical Ted
04-12-2007, 3:01 PM
Red dots are faster and easier to put on a target and most are not dependent on eye alignment. A magnified optic requires proper eye alignment before you can place the cross hairs on the target.

Red dots are illuminated by nature. Quality magnified optics with cross hairs require more sophisticated illumination methods and therefore cost more.

fiveflat
04-12-2007, 4:36 PM
If I'm going to be putting a varmint barrel White Oak upper on mine, would you recommend a variable scope, or a red dot? I can't imagine going with a red dot, or should I?

donger
04-12-2007, 4:38 PM
People buy them cause they are tacti-cool.....

Hey man, are you just joking? Or do you not know what you're talking about?

boosterboy
04-12-2007, 4:44 PM
i would buy them because they just look cool.:eek:

gn3hz3ku1*
04-12-2007, 4:51 PM
i guess its for when the aliens or zombies attack and i do not have time to line up the front sight to the back one

brando
04-12-2007, 5:02 PM
Yep, they're not lasers or "scopes" - just a dot illuminated reticle of sorts designed to be acquired with both eyes open at close range. They came about as a faster alternative to iron sights, particularly in low light. The Armson EOG was a first generation model that you couldn't actually see though. The earliest Aimpoint was the same way (circa 1970 I believe). They really started to take off in the latter half of the 80s with the Aimpoint 1000, but they were large compared to today's red-dot optics. By the late 90s they'd become the standard for close quarters shooting. EOTech took a slightly different approach by creating a larger field of view and using a holographic reticle. This approach is particularly good because the reticle sort of compensates for varying angle of incidence from your eye to the reticle. In other words, you can shoot it accurately without a proper cheek/stockweld (great when you're bouncing around in a vehicle). The reason none of these are magnified is because at close range (< 50m) any magnification in the optic slows acquisition of the target.

Surveyor
04-12-2007, 6:18 PM
I'm putting some sort of holo site on my plinker build. When you're shooting cans you dont need magnification.

The long range build gets the scope.

pnkssbtz
04-12-2007, 6:20 PM
Hey man, are you just joking? Or do you not know what you're talking about?

He is joking because he has one =P


My reason for having an eotech is that it allows me to have fast target acquisition, does not require that I have a proper cheek weld and sight fixture and I can acquire and aim with BOTH eyes open which allows me better situational awareness.

DJDace
04-12-2007, 7:23 PM
If I'm going to be putting a varmint barrel White Oak upper on mine, would you recommend a variable scope, or a red dot? I can't imagine going with a red dot, or should I?

Well that really depends on the type of shooting you plan to be doing. If you are going to be shooting for precision over longer distances then a variable power scope will serve you better than a red dot zero magnification optical platform.

If and when the day comes that I put together a CQB Rifle I imagine I will be going with a 4x ACOG with a Dr. Optics red dot reflex on top.

fiveflat
04-13-2007, 7:58 AM
Well, I'll be doing some quantity squirrel shooting with mine (as I do with my bolt .223) at ranges over 100 yards - sometimes out to 200-250 yards.
Will I be okay with any Variable scope that I'd put on my bolt rifle or do I need a special "tactical" vari rifle scope? ;)

Cali-V
04-13-2007, 10:59 AM
IMHO.... Unless you have great eyesight, 150+ yards is outside of the ideal range for a red dot zero magnification system... Shooting squirrels or tasty rabbits, at 200+ yds will net better results with a variable scope...

Fjold
04-13-2007, 12:55 PM
Well, I'll be doing some quantity squirrel shooting with mine (as I do with my bolt .223) at ranges over 100 yards - sometimes out to 200-250 yards.
Will I be okay with any Variable scope that I'd put on my bolt rifle or do I need a special "tactical" vari rifle scope? ;)

Get a good quality 3x9, 4x12, etc. scope for varminting. Better yet get two rifles.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v214/Fjold/LR.jpg

fiveflat
04-13-2007, 1:05 PM
Fjold,
That top rifle is nice.