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Darklyte27
03-09-2012, 4:05 PM
I have a few of them, MSR pocket rocket, MSR supafly, Primus eta express and next week ill get thejetboil Sol Aluminum.

Previous jetboil sets didnt wow me but the new ones are awesome from what ive seen. they are all contained in a pot system with many features thought out.

http://shop.jetboil.com/index.php/sol-cooking-system.html

the only drawback i see is that only the small 100 gram canister fits in the pot. the 230 gram size are too big.

The other features that got my attention is that the neoprene cozy has the temp indicator, which turns yellow/orange when water is boiling. Also it has little notches that hold the pot in place to the burner.

the boil times are about 2 min 15 seconds. pretty fast compared to most systems.

Penny Stove instructions
Many videos on youtube.
http://www.pear3.org/camping/pennystove.php

http://shop.jetboil.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/5e06319eda06f020e43594a9c230972d/f/i/file_26_14.jpg

11HE9
03-09-2012, 5:00 PM
The closest thing I have to a "Backpacking" stove is my old Optimus 8R
*not mine, but similar condition :(
138884


I have been itching to add a small MSR propane stove to the collection:cool:

cptorrez
03-09-2012, 5:04 PM
I have a whisperlite from msr. I have had it for 10 years or so? still works like a dream

rudigan
03-09-2012, 7:15 PM
The closest thing I have to a "Backpacking" stove is my old Optimus 8R
*not mine, but similar condition :(
138884


I have been itching to add a small MSR propane stove to the collection:cool:

Nice! I've still got an old Optimus/Svea 123, and a couple of MSR whisperlites, the last one I got is the simmerlite.

Always been a white gas guy as they are reliable in any weather conditions at any altitude. Super reliable if you take care of them. Some of the old ones, like the Svea could be a firebomb once in a while though LOL. Hooked on MSR

wilit
03-09-2012, 7:20 PM
I use an MSR pocket rocket. It and the canister fit nicely into my Snow Peak TI pot.

Tanner68
03-09-2012, 9:26 PM
I like those old Optimas in the blue box with the brass tank. I have been meaning to pick up a nice vintage one.

For backpacking, my latest is the Snowpeak Litemax Titanium. It is like the jetboil burner, and without the dedicated pot system.

http://www.snowpeak.com/stoves/backpacking/litemax-titanium-stove-gst-120.html

Darklyte27
03-10-2012, 6:32 AM
All my other stoves you just set the pot on top where you have to try to center it, I think the jetboil one where it has those 3 notches helps you align the pot in the center plus less chance of the pot falling off the stove.

My primus stove has this "flux ring" which increases heat transfer boiling your water faster.

jetboil also uses this technology and their claim

FluxRing yields fuel efficiencies of over 80%, compared with the 30-40% typical of standard stoves and cookware. Bottom line: weight and money savings because a canister of fuel boils twice the volume of water. A single 100-gram Jetpower canister boils 10 liters of water (23 liters for a 230-gram canister).

something you might consider if you plan on getting a new backpacking stove system.

smle-man
03-10-2012, 9:23 AM
I have a Soviet army stove that runs on vehicle gas. It sounds like an F4 Phantom on full afterburner when it is turned all the way up. A little bulky but it will boil water in no time at all.

bigger hammer
03-10-2012, 12:53 PM
Anyone using an alcohol stove? No moving parts. Nothing to break or lose. Fuel is available just about everywhere. No cannisters to carry out. Smaller, lighter and simpler. Less danger from the fuel.

The trade off is that the energy level of alcohol is lower and so cooking, boiling, etc. takes a bit longer. But you'll find that many UL (ultralight) backpackers are using them.

Best ones I've found: https://www.minibulldesign.com/ProductCart/pc/home.asp

jojo8080
03-10-2012, 1:13 PM
Along the lines of an alcohol stove
Has anyone build one of those penny stoves with a used aluminum can and a penny
I'd be interested to know if they work

Darklyte27
03-10-2012, 3:19 PM
alcohol, spillage? prime? bit longer? how long?
I think the jetboil one beats it, compact, everything into 1 container, burner, fuel, pot, lid, canister stand, piezo electric start.

bigger hammer
03-10-2012, 4:45 PM
I've built a few penny stoves and they work very well. I have friends who flew to a destination but TSA would not let them bring their stoves aboard. When they touched down they made stoves from soda cans.

alcohol, spillage? prime? bit longer? how long?
I think the jetboil one beats it, compact, everything into 1 container, burner, fuel, pot, lid, canister stand, piezo electric start.

Yes. Spillage can be a problem, as it can with any liquid fuel. But with alcohol it's not going to ruin other items in the pack such as food or clothes, as petroleum based fuels will. Some alcohol stoves need priming, some don't. The ones that use carbon fiber wicks do not. They are also not affected by temperature as are most canister stoves. Some are nearly useless at much below freezing, increasing cook times and causing difficulty in lighting them.

As to longer cook times, the standard is "how long to boil two cups of room temp water." The Jetboil will take about 2:30 (per Jetboil specs on the REI website). The Minibulldesign that I use takes about 4-5 minutes. The Jetboil Flash system (the first model with the piezo lighter) weighs about 15 ounces. But that does not include the fuel canisters (most people will carry two, in case one leaks [which you won't discover until it's cooking time]) which weigh about 4 oz each, bringing the total to 23 oz.

My Minibulldesign M3 alcohol stove, with TI .85L pot, pot stand, windscreen, and 8 oz of fuel weighs about 16 oz., including the Reflectix insulation for the pot. AND it's a much smaller package than the Jetboil.

Many people are put off by the "jet engine" sound the Jetboil makes. I prefer hearing the sound of the woods that the M3 allows. It's silent. Run out of fuel for the Jetboil and you need a well stocked outdoors store to refuel. Any hardware store, Minimart, or drug store has fuel for the alcohol stove.

The Jetboil works very well when new, but after a couple of years of use may develop issues of hard lighting, an inability to simmer or other problems due to contaminants getting on the small internal jets. The alcohol stove has no such internal parts that will cause issues.

Each stove and type of stove has its advantages and disadvantages. If you're car camping where you're not limited as to how much weight you can carry, the good ol' Coleman two burner, running on propane or even white gas is great. But if you have to carry your kitchen with you for a trip lasting about a week, alcohol is the lighter alternative and only gives up a small advantage.

Tripper
03-10-2012, 5:07 PM
so, your saying that, using the alcohol stove, for the same weight, you could boil more water?

in your post it says 2:30 for jetboil, a previous post suggesting 10 liters using 100 grams fuel.

I'm just curious, ounce for ounce, which results in the most water boiled??

such as 10 liters, how many ounces total weight, stove and fuel would i need for each type
I do like the versatility of the alcohol, but will it end up weighing more.

scootergmc
03-10-2012, 5:19 PM
Along the lines of an alcohol stove
Has anyone build one of those penny stoves with a used aluminum can and a penny
I'd be interested to know if they work

alcohol, spillage? prime? bit longer? how long?
I think the jetboil one beats it, compact, everything into 1 container, burner, fuel, pot, lid, canister stand, piezo electric start.


Homemade alcohol stoves are fun. And they work great. The penny stove on the left in the pic below was a quick jobber, nothing to be proud of at all. Precision is well-suited for a penny stove. The Friskies can job on the right was a little more precise, and boils fast. Put a pot on the top and the holes turn into jets.

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b249/scootergmc/IMG_20110723_192924.jpg

Sunday
03-10-2012, 5:20 PM
I have a Snow Peak and have made most of the alky stoves that I have found on the web over the last 5 years.

Sunday
03-10-2012, 5:22 PM
Homemade alcohol stoves are fun. And they work great. The penny stove on the left in the pic below was a quick jobber, nothing to be proud of at all. Precision is well-suited for a penny stove. The Friskies can job on the right was a little more precise, and boils fast. Put a pot on the top and the holes turn into jets.

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b249/scootergmc/IMG_20110723_192924.jpg
Those two are my favorite stoves. especially the Friskies can stove.

Tripper
03-10-2012, 5:28 PM
after reading a bit more, where do i get a good one, i'll have to play with making one

bigger hammer
03-10-2012, 5:58 PM
so, your saying that, using the alcohol stove, for the same weight, you could boil more water?

in your post it says 2:30 for jetboil, a previous post suggesting 10 liters using 100 grams fuel.

I'm just curious, ounce for ounce, which results in the most water boiled??

such as 10 liters, how many ounces total weight, stove and fuel would i need for each type
I do like the versatility of the alcohol, but will it end up weighing more.

It gets complicated when you start trying to figure weights for larger amounts of water boiled. For one thing you have to figure in the weight of the empty canisters/alcohol bottles that must be carried out. The canister fuels have more energy (translates to more heat per unit) than alcohol. But as it gets colder, some of that advantage is lost because of the lower vapor pressure when the canisters get cold. Generally it's a break even for canister stoves and alcohol at about 7-10 days for trips that are taken in relatively warm (not below freezing) weather. For shorter trips, alcohol is lighter. Beyond that, canister is lighter. Also remember that with the Jetboil, unless you're going to carry a larger pot, increasing the weight and bulk of your pack, you're limited to a pot that is about 1/2 liter. With the alcohol stove you can use any pot that you like.

I follow the lead of most UL backpackers, who nowadays are using alcohol stoves. A very important factor, for me at least, is the fool-proof nature of the alcohol stove. No canisters that can leak without warning. No tiny jets that can get clogged. No bending of various parts so they don't fit together properly.

I use a Jetboil on my boat, I might have to cook in ugly seas where having the pot mechanically joined to the stove is a distinct advantage. I rig a gimbal so it swings with the boat, and the weight of the canisters is of little concern. If Iím carrying it on my back, for the average 3-5 day trip, it's alcohol all the way. My BOB (really a "walk home" bag) contains an alcohol stove and 8oz of fuel.

after reading a bit more, where do i get a good one, i'll have to play with making one

Tripper just do a search for penny stove / cat food can / tuna can stove. There are LOTS of how to's on the Net.

Here are some of my fav's

http://royrobinson.homestead.com/Cat_Stove.html

http://zenstoves.net/Templates/TemplateSuperCat.GIF

And my favorite maker of stoves. http://www.minibulldesign.com/apps/webstore/?page=2

This guy has over 1,000 videos on YouTube discussing stoves and related stuff.

bigger hammer
03-10-2012, 6:18 PM
Found another link with lots of stoves.

http://zenstoves.net/Links.htm

ElvenSoul
03-10-2012, 6:20 PM
Not just for the pack but also a survival stove

http://www.itstactical.com/gear/honey-stove-the-bees-knees-of-backpacking-stoves/

The Honey Stove does it all

acegunnr
03-10-2012, 7:59 PM
I own and use several of the Jetboils from the first one to their latest lightweight Titanium version. However I've always wanted to try wood burning stoves.

http://cache.backpackinglight.com/backpackinglight/images/bushbuddy-ultra-arctic-320.jpg

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/bushbuddy_ultra_wood_stove.html

bob7122
03-10-2012, 8:13 PM
-i like the look but i want something that can burn wood, alcohol, anything.

-how much is the fuel canister?

bob7122
03-10-2012, 8:14 PM
I own and use several of the Jetboils from the first one to their latest lightweight Titanium version. However I've always wanted to try wood burning stoves.

http://cache.backpackinglight.com/backpackinglight/images/bushbuddy-ultra-arctic-320.jpg

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/bushbuddy_ultra_wood_stove.html

it says they no longer stock this.

-where can i get one like this?

does the metal warp after heat is applied?

acegunnr
03-10-2012, 8:20 PM
it says they no longer stock this.

-where can i get one like this?

does the metal warp after heat is applied?

They are made in Canada, fairly lightweight and hold up very well (no warping).

http://www.bushbuddy.ca/

XdwoYrRkf0k

ElvenSoul
03-10-2012, 8:29 PM
Wood or liquid fuel for the minimalist

http://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/product577.asp

bob7122
03-10-2012, 8:29 PM
thank you acegunnr.

bob7122
03-10-2012, 8:32 PM
have you used that elvensoul?

ElvenSoul
03-10-2012, 8:47 PM
Bob I have used the Honey Stove not the Mini Stove Yet...still waiting!

ElvenSoul
03-10-2012, 8:50 PM
Cooked a nice big Jack Rabbit last year on the Honey Stove with the Hive Grill. Ummmmy Nom Nom!

bigger hammer
03-10-2012, 9:13 PM
If you're looking for a stove that will burn anything, I suggest the Caldera Cone. You start by picking the pot you want to use and then build the stove around it. The titanium ones can burn alcohol, Esbit or wood. They use a draft system that gives a very thorough burn. They make models that will fit into your pot or ones that you pack separately.

The Caldera Cones have their own alcohol stove (others don't work well) and they form an inverted cone that is at once a wind block, a pot stand, and a heat concentrator. They're very efficient during one of the alcohol stove's weak points, high winds.

http://www.traildesigns.com

If you want a wood burner, take a look at the Emberlit. They make it in SS and Ti. The system is better than the honey or Pika stoves Ė it's related to a rocket stove. It creates a draft that keeps the wood burning. You put sticks in it, that are up to a foot long and feed them in, as the end burns. This gives you a stove that puts out a constant heat. Stoves that are fed from a port near the top, flare up and cool down as the wood burns down and then they flare up when new wood is inserted. It's hard to maintain a relatively constant heat with them.

http://emberlit.com/default.php

Of course when you burn wood, you get soot on your pots and pans. Unless you carry a separate stuff sack them, you'll find that the soot gets on EVERYTHING! Yuckos.

leighb2282
03-10-2012, 9:16 PM
Alcohol stove for me personally, I have both a commercial alcohol stove (swedish Trangia stove) as well as a can stove I build, both work pretty well although oddly my can stove seems to burn cleaner although you are limited by a can stove to using all the fuel you pour in the can stove as there is no sealing can on it like the Trangia.

Both side by side for size comparison
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/attachment.php?attachmentid=139037&stc=1&d=1331446366

Closeup of the Soda-Can Stove
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/attachment.php?attachmentid=139038&stc=1&d=1331446366

Both lit in the dark - you can see the soda can burns cleaner (IMO)
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/attachment.php?attachmentid=139039&stc=1&d=1331446366

Tripper
03-10-2012, 9:21 PM
It gets complicated when you start trying to figure weights for larger amounts of water boiled. For one thing you have to figure in the weight of the empty canisters/alcohol bottles that must be carried out. The canister fuels have more energy (translates to more heat per unit) than alcohol. But as it gets colder, some of that advantage is lost because of the lower vapor pressure when the canisters get cold. Generally it's a break even for canister stoves and alcohol at about 7-10 days for trips that are taken in relatively warm (not below freezing) weather. For shorter trips, alcohol is lighter. Beyond that, canister is lighter. Also remember that with the Jetboil, unless you're going to carry a larger pot, increasing the weight and bulk of your pack, you're limited to a pot that is about 1/2 liter. With the alcohol stove you can use any pot that you like.

I follow the lead of most UL backpackers, who nowadays are using alcohol stoves. A very important factor, for me at least, is the fool-proof nature of the alcohol stove. No canisters that can leak without warning. No tiny jets that can get clogged. No bending of various parts so they don't fit together properly.

I use a Jetboil on my boat, I might have to cook in ugly seas where having the pot mechanically joined to the stove is a distinct advantage. I rig a gimbal so it swings with the boat, and the weight of the canisters is of little concern. If Iím carrying it on my back, for the average 3-5 day trip, it's alcohol all the way. My BOB (really a "walk home" bag) contains an alcohol stove and 8oz of fuel.



Tripper just do a search for penny stove / cat food can / tuna can stove. There are LOTS of how to's on the Net.

Here are some of my fav's

http://royrobinson.homestead.com/Cat_Stove.html

http://zenstoves.net/Templates/TemplateSuperCat.GIF

And my favorite maker of stoves. http://www.minibulldesign.com/apps/webstore/?page=2

This guy has over 1,000 videos on YouTube discussing stoves and related stuff.

thanks for the explanations
I was looking at a few youtubes on penny stoves.
now i'm wondering why i never actually did this

11HE9
03-10-2012, 9:26 PM
Along the lines of an alcohol stove
Has anyone build one of those penny stoves with a used aluminum can and a penny
I'd be interested to know if they work

I've made a few... I haven't done any field tests yet, but they will boil water with only a couple teaspoons of fuel ;)

139043

139044

139045

leighb2282
03-10-2012, 9:35 PM
Thats a sweet little setup in regards to the pot stand/wind break, what did you make that out of and are there any plans for that puppy?

I've made a few... I haven't done any field tests yet, but they will boil water with only a couple teaspoons of fuel ;)

139043

139044

139045

addyyoon
03-10-2012, 11:51 PM
Has anyone had experience with the MSR Pocket Rocket? I checked one out and I was looking to get one. Extremely compact and lightweight and I've read good reviews

CZ97B
03-11-2012, 12:41 AM
I have 2 of them. One burns fuel cubes and the other burns twigs. I use the fuel cube burner for backpacking since it is lighter, and the wood burning one I keep stashed in my bug-out bag (72 hour kit). My next backpack trip is scheduled for June to Whitney. And bugging out all depends on San Andreas.

Changalang
03-11-2012, 12:42 AM
this thread is full of awesome. what do you guys prefer most as fuel for those pop can stoves?

CZ97B
03-11-2012, 12:47 AM
The closest thing I have to a "Backpacking" stove is my old Optimus 8R
*not mine, but similar condition :(
138884


I have been itching to add a small MSR propane stove to the collection:cool:

I used to have one of these ages ago when they were state of the art.

Took it up onto many mountain tops.

They make them a lot lighter now.

CZ97B
03-11-2012, 12:48 AM
this thread is full of awesome. what do you guys prefer most as fuel for those pop can stoves?

The dry fuel cubes are lightest, so those are great for backpacking.

Alcohol can leak or spill in your backpack, so there's an inherent risk going that route.

Anything else works fine if you are near a vehicle when you camp, especially the small wood burners, since weight does not then matter.

When camping near my vehicle I use a Coleman gasoline burning stove which I also got at REI. This is also a part of my bug-out kit, in case San Andreas blows again, for bugging-in or bugging-out.

REI has almost everything you could ever need or want, and what they do not have (like parachute cord) you can get at any G/I surplus store.

leighb2282
03-11-2012, 5:04 AM
this thread is full of awesome. what do you guys prefer most as fuel for those pop can stoves?

90% of the soda can stoves i've seen run on Denatured alcohol (Lowes is your best bet, went into OSH and they gave me a blank stare when asked for denatured alcohol)

bigger hammer
03-11-2012, 5:13 AM
The preferred fuel for most alcohol stoves is denatured alcohol, methanol. You can usually find it cheapest at Home Depot, in the paint department, . In automotive stores it's sold under the brand name, "Heet." If you use Heet get ONLY the YELLOW bottle. The red bottle is a petroleum product and will give you all kinds of smoke that will make you heave and coat all your pots. It also does not burn very hot. You can use air brake anti-freeze that can be found at most truck stops. In an emergency you can use any high proof (180 or better) drinking alcohol, but ......... well, you know.

In a pinch you can use ethanol that you can get at any drug store. Actually the ethanol contains a bit more energy, meaning it takes less fuel to do the same thing, but it burns with a sooty flame in most stoves. There are a few stoves that are made to burn it and they're pretty clean. They can also burn methanol cleanly.

Here are some FAQs about alcohol stoves. https://www.minibulldesign.com/ProductCart/pc/viewcontent.asp?idpage=3

Darklyte27
03-11-2012, 6:46 AM
These stoves are very neat and cost pretty much nothing if you have the skills.
I found a very neat video of one
How long does a can of denatured alcohol last though? and according to the videos below, it took about near 5 minutes to boil water.

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bigger hammer
03-11-2012, 7:30 AM
How long does a can of denatured alcohol last though? and according to the videos below, it took about near 5 minutes to boil water.

I get a hard boil with my "Atomic stove" in about 5 minutes using about 25cc (.8 oz) of alcohol. An 8oz bottle would give me about ten boils. It's a little bit less for my M3, a more efficient stove. I can steam bake a giant muffin (feeds two) on about 2oz of alcohol. That's a hard boil and then @ 25 minutes of simmering, and have enough hot water for hot chocolate or coffee to go with it.

leighb2282
03-11-2012, 8:11 AM
for my soda can stove I can get about 2 cups of water into a hard boil and then cook hotdogs on 30ml of alcohol, thats about 10 minutes of 'burn time'

You are going to always get slightly differing results from different stoves as they all have factors which make their burn times different. You also have to factor in if you are using a simmer ring which may also have an effect on the burn time.

I get a hard boil with my "Atomic stove" in about 5 minutes using about 25cc (.8 oz) of alcohol. An 8oz bottle would give me about ten boils. It's a little bit less for my M3, a more efficient stove. I can steam bake a giant muffin (feeds two) on about 2oz of alcohol. That's a hard boil and then @ 25 minutes of simmering, and have enough hot water for hot chocolate or coffee to go with it.

Darklyte27
03-11-2012, 8:18 AM
Is the only way to control the burn is the amount of fuel you put in?
I think thats one of the drawbacks of those stoves?

leighb2282
03-11-2012, 8:27 AM
Is the only way to control the burn is the amount of fuel you put in?
I think thats one of the drawbacks of those stoves?

you could make a simmer ring which will control the amount of jets being used at any one time, this will give you the benefit of control over heat as well as (theoretically a longer burn time) I've not made one yet but may give it a bash if I have a spare bit of time today.

my commercial trangia actually came with a simmer ring which is useful once you have gotten something to a good heat you can back the flames down a bit to just keep it a continual lower heat.

wilit
03-11-2012, 9:58 AM
Anyone using an alcohol stove? No moving parts. Nothing to break or lose. Fuel is available just about everywhere. No cannisters to carry out. Smaller, lighter and simpler. Less danger from the fuel.


I have a Brasslite Turbo IID and a Packafeather FeatherFire stove. They both are nice super lite stoves, but at elevation in the cold, alcohol is too much of a PITA. Plus the boil times are too slow for me. While everyone else was eating their meals, I was still waiting for my water to boil.

bigger hammer
03-11-2012, 10:04 AM
Is the only way to control the burn is the amount of fuel you put in?
I think thats one of the drawbacks of those stoves?

If you're done cooking and there's still fire, then you can smother it out by putting a can over the stove. Most can just be blown out. With some, you can then pour the unused alcohol back into the bottle, and use it later.

The main drawback to alcohol stoves exists with the conventional models. If you run out of fuel, you have to let the stove cool down before refilling. But there are stoves available that allow you to keep them fueled continuously for as long as you have alcohol. My M4 (sorry, earlier I referred to it as an M3) is one such stove. It has a silicone tube that runs from the stove to an alcohol fuel bottle. It can be allowed to burn down so only the center of the "mushroom" top has a flame. That's the "simmer" setting. When that center starts to get smaller, you squeeze the bottle until the center is again burning. If you want to go a boil, just squeeze the bottle to send more alcohol to it so that the entire top of the "mushroom" is burning, giving a very hot flame. When you're done, it can be blown out.

Another drawback is that in bright light, as outdoors, the flame is invisible. Because they're silent, you have to keep an eye on the food to make sure that it's still cooking. If you knock the stove over you can't see what's burning until the material itself is on fire. The good news is that it can be put out with water, unlike petroleum products.

bigger hammer
03-11-2012, 10:27 AM
I have a Brasslite Turbo IID and a Packafeather FeatherFire stove. They both are nice super lite stoves, but at elevation in the cold, alcohol is too much of a PITA. Plus the boil times are too slow for me. While everyone else was eating their meals, I was still waiting for my water to boil.

The problem is not that you have an alcohol stove, the problem is that you have the wrong brand and/or that you either didn't use a windscreen or didn't use an effective one. "At elevation, in the cold" alcohol stoves are minimally affected. Canister stoves are adversely affect by the cold to a large degree, particularly by extreme cold where the fuel may not vaporize at all. Many people find that they have to carry their canisters under their jacket to keep it warmed enough so that it will work. While cooking, the heat reflected from the pot will keep them warmed, but after cooking is done for the day, many people take the canisters into their sleeping bag with them, so they'll start in the morning. A friend of mind had one leak in his bag and ruined it for the rest of the trip.

Since alcohol stoves, for the most part, are not pressurized, they NEED an effective windscreen, if they're used in the slightest breeze. It will carry the heat away from the pot and you may never get a boil. This is easily fixed with a system such as the Caldera Cone, an aluminum screen or my fav, one made of carbon fiber. The latter can be wrapped around the pot so that most of the heat is trapped as with the Cone. This can't be done with most aluminum screens, because they'll melt if they get too hot.

As to brand, I'd suggest (I'm starting to sound like a shill) that that you take a look at the M series of stoves from Minibulldesigns. I strongly recommend the M3 or M4. https://www.minibulldesign.com/productcart/pc/home.asp

The Caldera Cone systems are very effective at altitude or in extreme cold. On a recent trip where I used mine, I was consistently the first one eating and we all started food prep at the same time. Other stoves on that trip included a Jetboil, a Svea 123, a MSR Whisperlite, and a home-made alcohol model. I was also the only one who had the option to burn wood if I ran out of liquid fuel.

acegunnr
03-11-2012, 4:09 PM
Here is another cool wood burning backpacking stove.

The Backcountry Boiler (http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/boilerwerks_backcountry_boiler?utm_source=hiking-in-finland-blog&utm_small=blog&utm_campaign=2011-02-10hikingfinland_boilerwerks)


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http://cache.backpackinglight.com/backpackinglight/images/large/boilerwerks_backcountrykettle_lg.jpg

ElvenSoul
03-11-2012, 4:33 PM
Another great pack kit

http://www.canteenshop.com/index.html

My Brother-in law has used there Canteen Grill Stove with success. Although the kit is not light. Not really for backpacking more Bug Out Gear.

11HE9
03-11-2012, 5:29 PM
Thats a sweet little setup in regards to the pot stand/wind break, what did you make that out of and are there any plans for that puppy?

Thanks!, the design was just an idea that poped in my head. I picked up some 1/8 inch sheet aluminum at Home Depot and just "eye-balled" the measurements.

I think I need to make one of those Petal stoves next :cool:

leighb2282
03-11-2012, 6:42 PM
thanks! i'll have to grab some 1/8 inch sheet aluminum and give it a bash then!

And yes! that petal stove is definitely intriguing, very tempted to try that one out - even if I don't I think i'm going to refine my original design I have for my current stove to use some sort of wick around the sides of my stove - its currently just empty space and it always takes a bit fo time for the jets to finally take.

Thanks!, the design was just an idea that poped in my head. I picked up some 1/8 inch sheet aluminum at Home Depot and just "eye-balled" the measurements.

I think I need to make one of those Petal stoves next :cool:

ElvenSoul
03-11-2012, 7:19 PM
For a cheap and effective stove not that heavy

http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/WX130-1.html

It was designed as a wood stove, but with a little creativity can be a tri fuel stove.

Darklyte27
03-11-2012, 7:24 PM
Just made 2 penny stoves, 1 with 8 holes 1 with 16 holes they work pretty neat. slight tricky to get the flames to get going. I watched about 5 different videos on youtube about making/using them.
I realized you have to get some fuel all around the stove to help prime/heat up the fuel inside once thats done it gets going. Need to make some kind of pot stand.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v482/lcplwan/pennystove.jpg

1surfguy
03-11-2012, 7:47 PM
I like the Primus OMNIFUEL. It's been around for quite a while, is very dependable and runs on such a diverse list of fuels.

http://store.primuscamping.com/images/products/preview/p-328984.jpg

11HE9
03-11-2012, 8:25 PM
slight tricky to get the flames to get going... I realized you have to get some fuel all around the stove to help prime/heat up the fuel inside once thats done it gets going...

I had the same issue trying to get mine to light. I had a empty Comet cleanser container in the shed. I cut the bottom off of it (under my stove in my pic) and tried it as a priming pan, it worked great!!

bigger hammer
03-11-2012, 9:02 PM
Wrap a few feet of fiberglass wick around the body of your stove. Then you can put a few drops of fuel on it, light the wick, and it will speed up the process of getting the stove to "bloom."

Several stoves on this page show it. https://www.minibulldesign.com/productcart/pc/viewCategories.asp?idCategory=2

G-forceJunkie
03-12-2012, 12:42 AM
Push the top in deeper so the edge of the flames hit the rim of the bottom piece. I've found this will heat the stove faster and make it easier to light.Just made 2 penny stoves, 1 with 8 holes 1 with 16 holes they work pretty neat. slight tricky to get the flames to get going. I watched about 5 different videos on youtube about making/using them.
I realized you have to get some fuel all around the stove to help prime/heat up the fuel inside once thats done it gets going. Need to make some kind of pot stand.

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furyous68
03-12-2012, 9:24 AM
I'm very interested in one of these... though I want to wait until there are some actual user reviews on them first:

http://biolitestove.com/CampStove.html

Uses a turbine of sorts to create electricity while you cook off of it. They're making a larger one for home/ cabin use. Pretty cool technology if you ask me!

asheron2
03-12-2012, 9:47 AM
Coil Stoves are pretty neat and you might get some more effeciency since you are pressurizing the supply.

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bigger hammer
03-12-2012, 9:50 AM
Uses a turbine of sorts to create electricity while you cook off of it. They're making a larger one for home/ cabin use. Pretty cool technology if you ask me!

This is pretty cool technology. Until that comes online, I lean towards the Grover Rocket Stove. Very efficient use of wood. Obviously not something for backpacking, but great if the gas goes off or for car camping.

http://www.stockstorage.com/

http://www.stockstorage.com/images/rocket_stove_D.JPG