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View Full Version : Casing gets stuck in the barrel.... how do you get it out at the range?


SDM44
03-08-2012, 12:02 PM
I've had a couple of guns in the past (.22LR pistol and a 9mm pistol) where I would be shooting a few hundred rounds through it just fine, and then out of no where I get a FTE and see that the casing is stuck in the barrel.

What's the best or safest or proper way to get this out when you're at the range?


I've seen people say to take a cleaning rod and push it back out from the front, but I wouldn't want anything to discharge (even if it already fired) to come out the front and onto the rod or my hand. Never know if the bullet even fired out and the entire round is stuck, or if it did fire and the casing expanded and is stuck.

What I've done (or had to do since the slide wouldn't come off) was to lock the slide back and use a small knife and slowly pry the casing back out of the barrel. Not the best way, but I felt it was safer than through from the front and showing something inside the barrel.

So what's the best & safest way to remove a stuck casing/round in your barrel of a handgun?

teflondog
03-08-2012, 12:17 PM
If it's just a spent casing then I eject my magazine, lock the slide back, and use a small pocket knife to pry the casing out by the rim. It happens quite frequently as my Model 41 is super finicky. Just make sure not to scratch your finish.

t0kie
03-08-2012, 12:18 PM
Wait few seconds (30 seconds is good enough to me) while putting the pistol downrange.

After that, release the magazine, rac the slide back, tap (few times as needed) the bottom of the grip to the bench with kind of tilting it but again still pointing downrange (would be good if there is carpet in between to avoid marring the pistol). Usually it'll get the stuck round out thru the magazine well.

LovingTheYear1911
03-08-2012, 12:26 PM
I usually use a cleaning rod only if the casing has fired. Otherwise I'll use a flat head screw driver to take it out from the chamber end. It's only happened once where the shot hadn't fired with my buddies M&P. I took it out from the mag well using a flat head.

DRAB_81
03-08-2012, 12:38 PM
I always keep a couple wood dowels about 12" long in the range bag, that way I can clear squibs, stuck cases or stuck rounds if I ever have to. Cheap, lightweight, effective & won't damage the gun.

SDM44
03-08-2012, 12:47 PM
I usually use a cleaning rod only if the casing has fired.

What about when you're unsure if the round was fired? How do you check and verify without actually looking down the front of the gun?


I always keep a couple wood dowels about 12" long in the range bag, that way I can clear squibs, stuck cases or stuck rounds if I ever have to. Cheap, lightweight, effective & won't damage the gun.

I've thought of this, but it leads back to my question above. My only fear is that I use a rod or dowel and press the casing or bullet out (just by pressing the dowel against the table while keeping the gun pointed downrange and in safe direction, and not using my hand), and could there ever be the possible chance that a round 'explodes' on your when you remove by backing it out from the barrel?


Just trying to figure out a safe way of doing it. Thanks for the suggestions so far.

DRAB_81
03-08-2012, 12:59 PM
What about when you're unsure if the round was fired? How do you check and verify without actually looking down the front of the gun?




I've thought of this, but it leads back to my question above. My only fear is that I use a rod or dowel and press the casing or bullet out (just by pressing the dowel against the table while keeping the gun pointed downrange and in safe direction, and not using my hand), and could there ever be the possible chance that a round 'explodes' on your when you remove by backing it out from the barrel?


Just trying to figure out a safe way of doing it. Thanks for the suggestions so far.


I'm fairly sure that you'll know whether a round fired or not, even if it doesn't exit the barrel completely. Are you talking about the difference between a light strike & a squib?

Either way, I can't think of a reason a round would fire while driving it out of the chamber with a rod. Most handguns won't fire when out of battery. Just lock the slide back before you do it if possible.

.

Coded-Dude
03-08-2012, 1:16 PM
If you're at a place with a Range Officer, go ask them. If you don't have a rod they usually will.

redcliff
03-08-2012, 1:21 PM
What about when you're unsure if the round was fired? How do you check and verify without actually looking down the front of the gun?




I've thought of this, but it leads back to my question above. My only fear is that I use a rod or dowel and press the casing or bullet out (just by pressing the dowel against the table while keeping the gun pointed downrange and in safe direction, and not using my hand), and could there ever be the possible chance that a round 'explodes' on your when you remove by backing it out from the barrel?


Just trying to figure out a safe way of doing it. Thanks for the suggestions so far.

Field strip the pistol first. Pushing on a bullet's nose with nothing behind the catridge to hit the primer will not cause an unfired cartridge to fire.

If you're having the problem frequently you may need a need extractor, extractor spring or to have the chamber inspected, measured and possibly polished by a gunsmith.

bug_eyedmonster
03-08-2012, 1:51 PM
I usually carry a small narrow/thin flathead screw driver in my range bag. That has been the best method for me. If this is consistantly happening, I would take the advise from Redcliff and have a qualified gunsmith take a look at your extractor. This is something that happens to me once in a bluemoon, and if it's more frequent than that, and you've tried various trypes of ammo, then there's a bigger problem.

Jerry

Coded-Dude
03-08-2012, 2:28 PM
i'll get stuck .22 casings from cheap ammo in certain rifles. you may try feeding it something else if its a common occurrence.

g_conway
03-08-2012, 4:44 PM
What about when you're unsure if the round was fired? How do you check and verify without actually looking down the front of the gun?




I've thought of this, but it leads back to my question above. My only fear is that I use a rod or dowel and press the casing or bullet out (just by pressing the dowel against the table while keeping the gun pointed downrange and in safe direction, and not using my hand), and could there ever be the possible chance that a round 'explodes' on your when you remove by backing it out from the barrel?


Just trying to figure out a safe way of doing it. Thanks for the suggestions so far.

I have had the problem of a stuck round unfired, and the slide would not come back enough to recock on a DAO gun. I ended up beating the round out with a dowel rod. I used a mirror and flashlight to view.

CA Cowboy
03-09-2012, 1:08 AM
I have used a leatherman tool to pull stuck casings that have been discharged.Dont do this if the round is live,when that happened I field stripped the weapon and took the barrel to my gunsmith for extraction.This happened in a .40 cal Glock 23 I was shooting 9mm with a Lone Wolf change out barrel.Gunsmith said it got stuck because my .40 extractor failed to grab the 9mm casing.I only shoot the round the pistol is chambered for now.

iareConfusE
03-09-2012, 1:30 AM
Pry it out from the case rim using my knife.

SFgiants105
03-09-2012, 1:34 AM
I usually use a cleaning rod only if the casing has fired. Otherwise I'll use a flat head screw driver to take it out from the chamber end. It's only happened once where the shot hadn't fired with my buddies M&P. I took it out from the mag well using a flat head.

Yup. If it's jammed in there real good, i'll let it sit in some cleaning lube. If I absolutely can't get an un-fired round out (hasn't happened yet, knock on wood), I would wait to have a gunsmith take it out (assuming the rangemaster couldn't do anything about it).

bhartin
03-09-2012, 2:22 PM
I always keep the 'handled' section of a cleaning rod in my range bag for pistols, but never had to clear one like this on my own gun. I did have to check a range rental once for a possible squib (long barreled MkII so was hard to visually see it from the breech end). For that one I got an RO to give the okay on it using one of their own rods.

For rifle, I keep three 12" pieces of 1/4" dowel in my bag and my rubber/plastic-tipped hammer. I haven't had to clear a casing with it yet, but did have to clear a jammed cleaning patch that almost broke my rod (on a Mosin Nagant M91/30). The RO saw it, and afterward grabbed my hammer, held it high, and shouted "Proper Russian tool for proper Russian gun!"

Lead Waster
03-09-2012, 2:32 PM
If you are not sure if it fired, look at the primer. If it's doesn't have a firing pin impression, it's not fired. If it was a light strike, what I would do is take out the magazine, rack the slide and "fire" it again. Do this a few times to make sure that the case is actually fired or will not LIKELY fire. Then leave it pointed downrange for at least a 30 count. Even if you try to poke it out with a dowel or cleaning rod, think about what happens if it does fire and keep your hands away accordingly. If you are at a range, at the very least tell the RO, even if he can't help, let him know or you're in for more trouble.

smle-man
03-09-2012, 3:01 PM
I wouldn't recommend digging at a stuck case with a knife or screwdriver especially on a .22 chamber. It doesn't take much to screw up the chamber mouth and cause feeding and extraction issues. Always use a cleaning rod or dowl rod after the pistol has been cleared. The correct rod should always go to the range with you.

zcktomcat
03-09-2012, 3:12 PM
Might wanqt make sure the extractor is clean. When I first got my 10/22 I would have alot of problems with fail to ejects. Since I started making sure to keep the extractor claw clean of carbon I have had zero such malfunctions.