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Kauf
03-05-2012, 6:03 PM
I understand that all rifles must be in a fully enclosed locked container while within 1000ft of a school or on school property. Is it legal to keep the lower receiver of an AR15 in a fully enclosed locked container while bringing the other parts (upper receiver magazines etc) into the dorm and not needing to lock them? I know that only the lower receiver is legally considered a weapon so where does something like this stand legally? Also, can ammunition be kept in the dorm? The entire purpose is so that if the car is burglarized that the entire rifle isn't lost, only the lower. Any input is appreciated! Thanks.

gun toting monkeyboy
03-05-2012, 6:31 PM
I know this sounds like one of those "Better to ask forgiveness than permission" kinds of things, but don't. Find out what your school's policy is on firearms. Seriously. Don't play games. They can (and will) take your toys, boot you out of the dorms and kick you out of school, depending on how big of dicks they want to be. Finish your education and then play games. You can check and see if they will let you keep stuff in your dorm room, or check it in at the campus police department. But if they say no, they mean no. Their school, their rules. If it bothers you that much, live off campus. This is just one of those situations where you aren't going to win. Until we win some more court cases, it isn't worth pushing this one. Sorry.

-Mb

Bolillo
03-05-2012, 6:43 PM
You're correct with the lower receiver = firearm thought. However, there may be some college / dorm issues about explosives, fireworks, ammunition, and things that go bang that you could run afoul of. Likewise a barreled upper and empty magazines, while technically legal (just parts), might just draw too much of the wrong kind of attention. One drunk/snoopy dorm mate sees your stuff or hears about it and you got some explaining. You might very well have a good explanation, but I don't think you want that kind of distraction. Not worth the risk.

Moonshine
03-05-2012, 6:56 PM
Unfortunately this is a reality of seeking a higher education in California. When I was a freshman in the dorms I had to keep my firearms at my parents' house and visit them on the weekends. However, during my sophmore year I moved to some nearby apartments and over time my roomates decided firearms were not evil but could be a rewarding experience under proper safety conditions.

CaliforniaLiberal
03-05-2012, 7:06 PM
As has been said, "Legal" has nothing to do with school and dorm rules. I believe that schools can get pretty twitchy about guns and I would advise you to just leave all guns and ammo someplace far off campus until you find out exactly what is and is not permitted.

Wouldn't be surprised if they locked down the campus and called the SWATs just for seeing a gun barrel or an empty cartridge case.

diginit
03-05-2012, 7:08 PM
A firearm is not a gun until assembled under Ca law... parts are parts. chickens or not. Once again. A gun is not a gun until fully assembled... even if you had a fully assembled lower and an upper. As long as they are not joined together. It is NOT a firearm.

SilverTauron
03-05-2012, 7:35 PM
A firearm is not a gun until assembled under Ca law... parts are parts. chickens or not. Once again. A gun is not a gun until fully assembled... even if you had a fully assembled lower and an upper. As long as they are not joined together. It is NOT a firearm.



This is not a matter that can be settled by looking at the statutes. Nearly every college in the country bans guns, knives, gun parts, ammunition,even BB guns and Nerf toys. The handful colleges that don't have a law like that in the campus regulations are recent losers of lawsuits filed to protect such regulations.

Even then, most college authorities from the university president on down consider firearms to be something slightly more welcome than Anthrax Cultures.A girl whose political affiliation featured a strong list to port threatened to call the campus cops on me for carrying legally off campus. Had she contacted the police before I did they would have put me in bracelets.This by the way did not take place in England, New Jersey, or New York, but the redder than a Ferrari state of South Dakota.

In a state like California, the presence of an AR15 upper ON CAMPUS at all , much less in one's dorm room, would be cause for an immediate arrest, followed by a university lockdown and an extended stay in the graybar hotel while the District Attorney scours the legal library for a reason to bury you under the jail for daring to possess arms on college property.

Why would the DA do such a thing? Well,most college presidents have very close connections with the state government. It would not be a surprise for the OP's college president to have a direct line to the Governors office, and finding a student with a disassembled "machine gun" in his possession would be enough reason for a few "phone calls" to be made. The outcome can vary from an extended stay in the clink to an automatic re-route to a psychological facility.

It is best to either avoid building a rifle, or to buy one complete and pay the premium to ensure no part of it crosses onto college property. Words of advice from a veteran attending school, don't dare tell anyone about your status as an armed individual.A person with the reputation as a firearm owner in college becomes a potential target of both the police and the criminals.

Librarian
03-05-2012, 7:50 PM
A firearm is not a gun until assembled under Ca law... parts are parts. chickens or not. Once again. A gun is not a gun until fully assembled... even if you had a fully assembled lower and an upper. As long as they are not joined together. It is NOT a firearm.

Sorry - that's wrong.

A disassembled firearm is still a firearm: see the wiki -- http://wiki.calgunsfoundation.org/Definition_of_a_firearm/gun

Perhaps you are thinking of a separated lower and upper not, together, being an 'assault weapon', since a lower - while still legally a firearm - is not semi-automatic nor is it centerfire until an appropriate upper is assembled to it.

Kauf
03-05-2012, 8:55 PM
I'm still confused...other than pulling something out of their *****es merely out of fear, how could you get in trouble for having parts to a gun? I realize that the university system's hierarchy are not the most stable minded individuals when it comes to guns, but I feel like it would be a completely bogus charge that they would bring. An upper is a part, not a firearm. The firearm would be secured in a locked container as per the requirements of the law. Living here is so frustrating :facepalm:

tabrisnet
03-05-2012, 9:15 PM
My employer has a policy of no firearms. I once had some mags shipped from Beretta... somebody in the mail room recognized the sender, and had the box quarantined. did I get in BIG TROUBLE? no. Did I get a stern talking to about regulations? YES. And that was just a few mags. Not ammo. Not an upper or a barrel (otoh, I later had some barrels shipped, and nobody recognized the sender so nobody said anything).

yellowfin
03-05-2012, 9:17 PM
It's going to be fun bulldozing university policies like these and the ideology that spawned them.

berto
03-05-2012, 9:25 PM
Please don't confuse CA law with your school's policies. Look to the rules of student conduct, especially re: your residency in the dorms, and for any "principles of community" type nonsense. You may well escape the DA but find yourself evicted, suspended, or expelled under your school's disciplinary policies. Somebody feeling threatened by the presence of your scary looking part might be enough to make things uncomfortable.

Scarecrow Repair
03-05-2012, 9:26 PM
I'm still confused...other than pulling something out of their *****es merely out of fear, how could you get in trouble for having parts to a gun? I realize that the university system's hierarchy are not the most stable minded individuals when it comes to guns, but I feel like it would be a completely bogus charge that they would bring. An upper is a part, not a firearm. The firearm would be secured in a locked container as per the requirements of the law. Living here is so frustrating :facepalm:

I don't know if you're being obtuse just to get a rise out of somebody, or truly out of touch with news of the last, say, 50 years. You could have a bunch of chocolate molded into the shape of a gun and get in trouble. Whether you were actually convicted and sent to prison is irrelevant. You would be arrested, roughly, and have to pony up some serious money before things were resolved, and you would certainly be expelled from school, and probably wouldn't get your tuition back.

That's just the way life is. You could scale the White House fence and sit down right next to it and be absolutely perfectly harmless and co-operative with the nice police officers, and you would not have a happy ending.

Blacks were lynched for allegedly whistling at white girls. Compared to that, any almost-a-gun incident is a far more scary offense with a much less final outcome, and that is just how life is.

All arguments to the contrary are about as intelligent and useful as "What part of 'shall not be infringed' don't you understand?" from people who are quite willing to accept restrictions on prisoners, 5 year old kids, and mental cases, yet cannot see how that is infringing a so-called absolute fundamental God-given natural unalienable right.

doug-y-doug
03-05-2012, 9:28 PM
Don't do it. It's not worth the trouble. Even if it isn't against the rules, they'll find a way to get you. I'm not sure if you understand how much time, money, and effort would be wasted if you were to get into trouble. Seriously.

Kauf
03-05-2012, 9:29 PM
I don't know if you're being obtuse just to get a rise out of somebody, or truly out of touch with news of the last, say, 50 years. You could have a bunch of chocolate molded into the shape of a gun and get in trouble. Whether you were actually convicted and sent to prison is irrelevant. You would be arrested, roughly, and have to pony up some serious money before things were resolved, and you would certainly be expelled from school, and probably wouldn't get your tuition back.

That's just the way life is. You could scale the White House fence and sit down right next to it and be absolutely perfectly harmless and co-operative with the nice police officers, and you would not have a happy ending.

Blacks were lynched for allegedly whistling at white girls. Compared to that, any almost-a-gun incident is a far more scary offense with a much less final outcome, and that is just how life is.

All arguments to the contrary are about as intelligent and useful as "What part of 'shall not be infringed' don't you understand?" from people who are quite willing to accept restrictions on prisoners, 5 year old kids, and mental cases, yet cannot see how that is infringing a so-called absolute fundamental God-given natural unalienable right.

Not to get a rise out of anyone. Simply asking if there is any way to keep my firearm at school as traveling to the parents house to shoot is out of the question much too far away. Sounds like its best to just leave it at home thanks guys

live2suck
03-05-2012, 9:57 PM
Knowing someone who was almost expelled and arrested for possession of firearms and firearm accessories in off-campus campus housing, I'd say what you're proposing is a really ... really ... really bad idea. Everything he was doing was also completely legal. It took him half a year of legal fees though, and plenty of time with Judicial Affairs to make sure he was allowed to graduate. In the end, the school had to admit he was in the right (just barely), and amended to the housing lease to specifically prohibit what he was doing.

If you bring any firearms/parts near campus keep them in locked and enclosed containers, the requirement of a search warrant is your best friend in case anything does happen. And DO NOT violate any rules/laws, read all of your campus's charter, and all state/federal laws associated with the topic.

Librarian
03-05-2012, 9:57 PM
I'm still confused...other than pulling something out of their *****es merely out of fear, how could you get in trouble for having parts to a gun? I realize that the university system's hierarchy are not the most stable minded individuals when it comes to guns, but I feel like it would be a completely bogus charge that they would bring. An upper is a part, not a firearm. The firearm would be secured in a locked container as per the requirements of the law. Living here is so frustrating :facepalm:

I was wondering about where you had thought to park your vehicle with the lower locked inside - on campus/school property would be illegal (PC 626.9, subsections (h) and (i)), so perhaps your intent was to street-park.

You don't mention which college, but I'm sure their web site has a page similar to 'student code of conduct', and related pages about discipline, which would explain the administrative procedures which govern students, which are entirely separate from California criminal law.

Not to get a rise out of anyone. Simply asking if there is any way to keep my firearm at school as traveling to the parents house to shoot is out of the question much too far away. Sounds like its best to just leave it at home thanks guys

Yes, most likely true.

mosinnagantm9130
03-05-2012, 10:02 PM
It's going to be fun bulldozing university policies like these and the ideology that spawned them.

+1. I look forward to it :43:

SilverTauron
03-05-2012, 10:15 PM
Another minor point on Campus housing. Before bringing any firearm related hardware past the front door, be sure to check the contract. Constitutional protections apply with cars and private property off-campus, but on-campus housing generally has a clause authorizing non-consensual search of a students room if the authorities feel a whim to investigate. All the police need do for "probable cause" to search is to persuade the housing director to open the OPs room for 'campus security', and we can all bet that's exactly what will happen.

As to the legal consequences, yes, the OP can be charged with a crime by the state. It may not have anything directly to do with the upper receiver. A bogus charge of brandishing a firearm or "disturbing the peace" still costs as much to beat in court as a legitimate one.The authorities won't have to look very hard to find something to toss on the docket, if only for appearances sake. The university in question must appear tough on crime, after all . Zero tolerance and all that jazz.

mag360
03-05-2012, 10:41 PM
for what it's worth. A friend of mine that went to college with me, told me a year after we had graduated while hanging out at my house and talking guns that he had a carry permit all through college and had it locked in a gym bag in his room. I wasn't supposed to have alcohol in my dorm, but I'd put a handle of jim beam in a backpack and you'd never know once it's in the dorm.

I'm not telling you what to do, just that what can't be seen, can't be spoken about, it's a moot point.

Philthy
03-05-2012, 10:56 PM
Check your student handbook. All the rules and codes of conduct are in there - similar to an employee handbook. It's not worth getting the boot or a blemish on your record, so know what you are allowed/not allowed to do.

I was always sure to have my "fun" OFF campus, because I'd have to answer to student affairs if I was caught doing anything...

resident-shooter
03-05-2012, 11:40 PM
ummm ask the school?

Random_Hero
03-06-2012, 1:24 AM
Here's my 02 cents.

Most schools in California have there own policy on firearms, you'd have to check there memorandum on the topic.

But take this into consideration. CCSF (City College of San Francisco) banned there campus police from carrying side arms, the Campus Chief resigned his position over the issue. But basically, they patrol with kevlar vests and mace. Super Trooper status...

In another case, there was a student dressed in woodland bdu's heading to a dorm with a rifle bag, this was at San Francisco State. In reality, it was a student who was returning from playing air soft. Someone called the police and the school was in lock down, with SWAT eventually arriving. I don't remember what happened to the kid.

USF (University of San Francisco) has a ROTC battalion. They use to do FTX's (Field Training Exercises) in Golden Gate Park, but they were banned from doing that. Apparently future Army Officers can't train on the soil they protect. Ironicly it was the Army that helped rebuild the city after the 1908 earthquake.

In different times, having a firearm in your dorm would have probably been non issue. Public High Schools in San Francisco use to have there own indoor .22 ranges and shooting clubs.

I once got suspended in high school for having brass in my backpack. I used it as a range bag and some spent shell casing fell into the bag. Not live rounds mind you. The school has a drug enforcement policy with the city and it was my sad luck that that same day the police K9 unit visited us. Dogs barked at me, bag was searched and some benign shells were found.

I was taken out of class, suspended, my father, a fed' was furious.

We live in california....

The rules suck, go eat some oranges...

Go rent an apartment off campus then store your fire-arms, till' then keep em' somewhere safe. Side campus dorms are notorious for stealing.

mag360
03-06-2012, 1:50 AM
k9's 'hit' on spent brass?

Sutcliffe
03-06-2012, 6:33 AM
Especially private ones.

In the eyes of the law an upper reciever is not a weapon. In the eyes of a liberal arts college it might be viewed with as much horror as the famed Tijuana Donkey Show. It will get you in a world of hurt and the administration will have no problem with sanctioning you.

ubet
03-06-2012, 7:22 AM
Friend of mine when we were in college always had a shotgun in the box of his truck (locked of course), he did that the whole time I knew him. Honestly though, dorms, not a good idea to have a firearm especially if its not in a damned good safe. To many drunks its not IF something will happen, its WHEN.

Random_Hero
03-06-2012, 7:47 AM
k9's 'hit' on spent brass?

To be honest, that is what I assumed the dogs 'hit' on, the powder residue. There is nothing else they would have detected, because the alternatives that dogs would 'hit' on is something I wouldn't do.

meaty-btz
03-06-2012, 8:42 AM
I think we can find a way to bulldoze these regs w/o resorting to 2A fight and the evil "gun" fear.

Find a series of college women who have been victimized and file chain after chain of lawsuit seeking damages based on the schools policy clearly indicates that they are taking responsibility for the safety of their students. Hell, pre-suit, you could probably get 90% of university Dons to publicly state that their policies are for the safety of their students. Bury them in lawsuits and drain them of every penny. But I take a scorched earth view of things. When you have an enemy burn their towns, villages, poison the wells, and salt the earth.

yellowfin
03-06-2012, 8:52 AM
I think we can find a way to bulldoze these regs w/o resorting to 2A fight and the evil "gun" fear.

Find a series of college women who have been victimized and file chain after chain of lawsuit seeking damages based on the schools policy clearly indicates that they are taking responsibility for the safety of their students. Hell, pre-suit, you could probably get 90% of university Dons to publicly state that their policies are for the safety of their students. Bury them in lawsuits and drain them of every penny. But I take a scorched earth view of things. When you have an enemy burn their towns, villages, poison the wells, and salt the earth.I've suggested this for years but nobody's done it. :facepalm:

SilverTauron
03-06-2012, 9:43 AM
I think we can find a way to bulldoze these regs w/o resorting to 2A fight and the evil "gun" fear.

Find a series of college women who have been victimized and file chain after chain of lawsuit seeking damages based on the schools policy clearly indicates that they are taking responsibility for the safety of their students. Hell, pre-suit, you could probably get 90% of university Dons to publicly state that their policies are for the safety of their students. Bury them in lawsuits and drain them of every penny. But I take a scorched earth view of things. When you have an enemy burn their towns, villages, poison the wells, and salt the earth.

That tactic has been tried before.The University generally moves heaven and earth to squash the story and negotiate a solution that keeps them out of court.

An example of this is the following:

....However, Collins couldn't aim her gun at the serial rapist who attacked her at the University of Nevada at Reno, where she was a student. That's because, like most public colleges outside of Utah and Colorado, UNR is a "gun free" zone. The rule required her to leave her gun at home, leaving her defenseless the one time she needed its protection most.

In October of 2007, while walking to her car after a night class, Collins was grabbed from behind in a university parking garage less than 300 yards from a campus police office. The school's "gun-free" designation meant nothing to James Biela, a serial rapist with a gun of his own, who saw Collins as an easy target. "He put a firearm to my temple," she recounted, "clocked off the safety, and told me not to say anything, before he raped me."

(The Nevada concealed carry law) would abolish the requirement that permit holders get permission from the university president -- a request that is routinely denied. (Amanda was finally allowed to carry her weapon -- after she was attacked).

Source: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/04/08/opponents-gun-free-zones-universities-unlikely-hero-nevada-woman/#ixzz1oML0U2WZ

Most colleges have a rule authorizing concealed carry on letterhead of the University President. As one can imagine that's a document which is handed out on a 10,000 year geological timescale , but the Nevada college authorized Amanda's right to carry ONLY after she was raped at gunpoint. That's the burden of 'need' required for a university to recognize someone's right to self defense, and even in that criminal circumstance the college only did so because the alternative was a nasty day in court.

meaty-btz
03-06-2012, 10:11 AM
That tactic has been tried before.The University generally moves heaven and earth to squash the story and negotiate a solution that keeps them out of court.

An example of this is the following:

....However, Collins couldn't aim her gun at the serial rapist who attacked her at the University of Nevada at Reno, where she was a student. That's because, like most public colleges outside of Utah and Colorado, UNR is a "gun free" zone. The rule required her to leave her gun at home, leaving her defenseless the one time she needed its protection most.

In October of 2007, while walking to her car after a night class, Collins was grabbed from behind in a university parking garage less than 300 yards from a campus police office. The school's "gun-free" designation meant nothing to James Biela, a serial rapist with a gun of his own, who saw Collins as an easy target. "He put a firearm to my temple," she recounted, "clocked off the safety, and told me not to say anything, before he raped me."

(The Nevada concealed carry law) would abolish the requirement that permit holders get permission from the university president -- a request that is routinely denied. (Amanda was finally allowed to carry her weapon -- after she was attacked).

Source: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/04/08/opponents-gun-free-zones-universities-unlikely-hero-nevada-woman/#ixzz1oML0U2WZ

Most colleges have a rule authorizing concealed carry on letterhead of the University President. As one can imagine that's a document which is handed out on a 10,000 year geological timescale , but the Nevada college authorized Amanda's right to carry ONLY after she was raped at gunpoint. That's the burden of 'need' required for a university to recognize someone's right to self defense, and even in that criminal circumstance the college only did so because the alternative was a nasty day in court.

So shoot for the moon in damages so that they can't just settle. There is no $ amount in existence to "compensate" for a rape. Get the media involved IMMEDIATELY, they love juicy stories with victim women, make it a national issue. Lean heavily on a WOMEN'S RIGHTS issue. This is a war and should be strategized as one would a war. Your goal isn't got get gun carry in these suits. Your goal is to attack the policy directly through a "responsible for students" angle. You don't even have to ask for a gun, or a knife, or anything. Your goal is to destroy the policy in general through a costly liability angle. What you want to do is put the school into a position where they have to abandon policy in order to avoid liability. Then, after that, then you go for LTC and 2A. The problem with the Nevada attack was just that, it went right for 2A against an entrenched and powerful opponent. That is a difficult battle to win at the best. First you get the clients, then you get the media blitz going, then you get the courts involved, then after you make it liability (they don't have the government shield that normal LEO has. When they take responsibility they take it and have to follow through). Then you don't even have to ask for campus carry because the policies were to costly to implement or if they are they are now in a weakened position and then you go for the throat.

I have constantly said we do not utilize the advantageous tactics of our opponents. The media is a Weapon and it should be used by us. They are interested in making money and we can line up the stories w/o the 2A rejection angle and paint victims and evil money grubbing University Administration intentionally subjecting women to rape. You want to use hard, damaging, tactics. You want to hurt their public image. You want those fugly NOW women protesting on campus and decrying them for failing to protect their students, which they can't. No one can. Use your enemies chess pieces as weapons of your own. Use his tactics against him. Play dirty because no one is Lilly White and Clean under media scrutiny. And we, are neither more moral nor cleaner under similar lamps so we gain nothing by attempting to be the Paladin except ending up looking just like the USA does, Hypocrites.

Universities want one thing: $$$
You want to undermine them? Another component of this tactic that can and should be done is to find and compile all crime reports for every university that we can. Then we find a way to get pamphlets with those ACCURATE crime reports into high schools and on the web and other major things. MEDIA CAMPAIGN here too. Get parents the information to scrutinize the school. Then carefully craft wording to create new meanings and links in the parental consciousness to the anti-weapons policies and increased violent crime and rape. Use properly formed propaganda and start our own reprogramming. I believe the FBI compiles these crime statistics so it would be hard to "repress" but not impossible. Couple it with strategic interviews with young college girls who report that the schools have been forging or altering reports so that crime is lower than it is and they make her feel unsafe and are actively working to make her a victim. We need this kind of thing on National News. The Public is a crude weapon that can be programmed and used. Why we never seem to use them or employ the needed techniques is beyond me.

Dreaded Claymore
03-06-2012, 10:26 AM
At Humboldt State University, they wouldn't let me keep my fencing foil in my dorm room. That should tell you something. :facepalm:

meaty-btz
03-06-2012, 10:28 AM
At Humboldt State University, they wouldn't let me keep my fencing foil in my dorm room. That should tell you something. :facepalm:
they probably didn't want you to do what I used to do... fence and sabre in the dorm hallways..

Open the door to men in protective masks and clothing having at it.
:eek::eek::eek:

Lugiahua
03-06-2012, 10:35 AM
My school doesn't have policy on firearms, but still no-go without a LTC due to the State law...

510dat
03-06-2012, 10:39 AM
I know this sounds like one of those "Better to ask forgiveness than permission" kinds of things, but don't. Find out what your school's policy is on firearms. Seriously. Don't play games. They can (and will) take your toys, boot you out of the dorms and kick you out of school, depending on how big of dicks they want to be. Finish your education and then play games. You can check and see if they will let you keep stuff in your dorm room, or check it in at the campus police department. But if they say no, they mean no. Their school, their rules. If it bothers you that much, live off campus. This is just one of those situations where you aren't going to win. Until we win some more court cases, it isn't worth pushing this one. Sorry.

-Mb

This.

Your job right now is to obtain the absolute best education you can wrest from this university, and you are paying them good money for the privilege. Like it or not, universities are their own little world that work by their own special rules, and you are very, very unlikely to beat them at their game.

Play the game, get your diploma and degree, and then do what you like on your own dime.

(That said, when it comes to academics, twist their rules as hard as you can in order to graduate on time.)

stix213
03-06-2012, 12:15 PM
This isn't legal advice, but avoiding drama advice....

1) Find some buddies
2) Rent a place off campus

Eljay
03-06-2012, 1:17 PM
I looked up firearms in a local college's student handbook - and the wording is really weird - but basically it would include anything that shoots any projectile, firecrackers, weaponry, knives, ammunition and there's some vague wording about "weapon materials". Is an upper a "weapon material"? Do you really want to find out?

It's especially weird because they make it really clear you can't have any kind of knife on campus but there are kitchens in the dorms...

Where I went to school you couldn't have anything on campus, but you could check it into a free locker at public safety which had their offices across the street.

SouperMan
03-06-2012, 6:32 PM
I know this sounds like one of those "Better to ask forgiveness than permission" kinds of things, but don't. Find out what your school's policy is on firearms. Seriously. Don't play games. They can (and will) take your toys, boot you out of the dorms and kick you out of school, depending on how big of dicks they want to be. Finish your education and then play games. You can check and see if they will let you keep stuff in your dorm room, or check it in at the campus police department. But if they say no, they mean no. Their school, their rules. If it bothers you that much, live off campus. This is just one of those situations where you aren't going to win. Until we win some more court cases, it isn't worth pushing this one. Sorry.

-Mb

^^^I would agree on this as well. Don't want to be a test case, especially if you want to finish your degree.

At Humboldt State University, they wouldn't let me keep my fencing foil in my dorm room. That should tell you something. :facepalm:

they probably didn't want you to do what I used to do... fence and sabre in the dorm hallways..

Open the door to men in protective masks and clothing having at it.
:eek::eek::eek:

Man! That sucks!

Reminds me of a time my friend got stopped by campus PD because my friend had a katana-handle umbrella. LOL.

jwkincal
03-06-2012, 6:52 PM
One Halloween I wore my BDUs and carried (slung) a rubber-duck M16 to classes (at a community college). This was in the 80's; I wasn't hassled by anyone on campus at all except for those people who knew me and asserted that what I was wearing wasn't technically a costume in my case. Times have changed for sure.

rolncode3
03-06-2012, 7:26 PM
Does the school have a police department? When I was at Sac State, I could check my pistol in at the PD and they would keep it in their safe. Might not be acceptable to a lot of guys, but it did work. I could stop by anytime (24 hrs) and they would get it for me.

I wouldn't want a firearm (or identifiable parts of one) in a dorm. There's a lot of drunken immature behavior carried out in dorms. Last thing you'd want is someone running around with it after a few too many shots (no pun).

WDE91
03-06-2012, 7:32 PM
I would contact a local gunstore and see if you can "rent" space there
enough space for your gear

Dreaded Claymore
03-06-2012, 9:16 PM
I wouldn't want an automobile (or identifiable keys to one) in a dorm. There's a lot of drunken immature behavior carried out in dorms. Last thing you'd want is someone driving around with it after a few too many shots.
Look what happens when I change some of the words in your post.

Your remark is understandable, and it comes from a mindset that everyone has sometimes and that is appropriate for certain situations. But it's the mindset that, when you're stuck in it, causes you to advocate total disarmament of the public. Let me clarify that: the remark you made is the argument that people use to take away our rights.

I don't think you said that on purpose, I think you just didn't make the connection at the time. That's why I'm pointing it out to you (and everyone else) now. Please understand that I have nothing but good feelings for you.

Of course, now that we've established that it is unacceptable to bar someone from exercising a right on the grounds that they might misuse it, we have to ask, "Well, how should we fight against misuse of the right?" The answer can be found by, again, looking at what we do with cars in the same context.


We make it known to all that it is not acceptable to drink and drive.
If someone drinks and drives anyway, we prosecute them for committing a crime.

And we should do the same thing for misuse of guns.

Ron-Solo
03-06-2012, 9:25 PM
All legal and school policies aside, university parking areas and dorms are prime targets for theft. Imagine how many copies of dorm room keys are floating around.

When I went to UCLA in the 70's, my car was broken into three times in one year. At my local community college, five times in one year and four times in another.

For that reason, I would never recommend keeping a firearm (or parts) in a dorm or vehicle on a college or university campus.

rolncode3
03-07-2012, 12:28 AM
Look what happens when I change some of the words in your post.

Your remark is understandable, and it comes from a mindset that everyone has sometimes and that is appropriate for certain situations. But it's the mindset that, when you're stuck in it, causes you to advocate total disarmament of the public. Let me clarify that: the remark you made is the argument that people use to take away our rights.

I don't think you said that on purpose, I think you just didn't make the connection at the time. That's why I'm pointing it out to you (and everyone else) now. Please understand that I have nothing but good feelings for you.

Of course, now that we've established that it is unacceptable to bar someone from exercising a right on the grounds that they might misuse it, we have to ask, "Well, how should we fight against misuse of the right?" The answer can be found by, again, looking at what we do with cars in the same context.


We make it known to all that it is not acceptable to drink and drive.
If someone drinks and drives anyway, we prosecute them for committing a crime.

And we should do the same thing for misuse of guns.

WTH? I never said that he should be prohibited from having it because he'll misuse. I said it's a bad idea because of all the other idiots. Even if it's legal, good judgment might still say it's not the best idea. I've lived in several dorms, and can attest to the stupid stuff that happens.

I do think that the individual should be held responsible, just as with drunk driving. You clearly changed my words, but I said exactly what I said - on purpose.

Databyter
03-07-2012, 1:05 AM
I understand that all rifles must be in a fully enclosed locked container while within 1000ft of a school or on school property. Is it legal to keep the lower receiver of an AR15 in a fully enclosed locked container while bringing the other parts (upper receiver magazines etc) into the dorm and not needing to lock them? I know that only the lower receiver is legally considered a weapon so where does something like this stand legally? Also, can ammunition be kept in the dorm? The entire purpose is so that if the car is burglarized that the entire rifle isn't lost, only the lower. Any input is appreciated! Thanks.

I won't speak to the law, but will allow the experts to do that.

But I would bet money your school policy prevents weapons being there at all.

CaliforniaLiberal
03-07-2012, 2:40 AM
........I wouldn't want a firearm (or identifiable parts of one) in a dorm. There's a lot of drunken immature behavior carried out in dorms. Last thing you'd want is someone running around with it after a few too many shots (no pun).


I believe that DreadedClaymore's point is that you are unthinkingly advocating disarming gun owners living in dorms because of what Might happen. This (what Might happen) is pretty much the foundation of the whole fantastic, illogical, unconstitutional system of California Gun Law that we are fighting to undo.

The mindset of the Anti-2nd Amendment folk is attractive, seductive. "If we can only prevent what Might happen than we all would be safe from gun violence."

Gun Free Zones are Means of Self Defense Free Zones.

Another analogy might be that anyone who lives in a community where alcohol is available for purchase should not be allowed to own a car. Because of what Might happen.

goober
03-07-2012, 6:23 AM
Just. Don't.
Unless your school has much different policies than most CA universities, their weapons policy is probably very strict.
This isn't about CA or Federal law, the school's policies trump those on their property.
Unless you want to risk expulsion or worse, keep the guns and significant gun components off-campus.
Sure, maybe nobody will fuind out. But if they do, you can expect severe ramifications.

gatesbox
03-07-2012, 6:41 AM
I would contact a local gunstore and see if you can "rent" space there
enough space for your gear

^^^^ this is the practical answer, up North I know Reeds has some kind of Lockers that they rent. I'd be willing to bet a local gun club might help you out as well if you joined.

mud99
03-07-2012, 9:42 AM
The high school and community college I went to banned near everything, including knives.

I spent quite a bit of time fixing their computers with my leatherman that I carried pretty much all the time...

I've found that if you are white and nerdy, the law very rarely applies to you in this state...we are a shining example of racial equality...no stereotypes at work here...

That said, I wouldn't bring a firearm into a dorm. The best case is that you don't get caught, the worst case is that some other kid borrows your gun and goes on a shooting spree...

If you want to have some fun, a gun case stored in your dorm with the second amendment inside would surely get you a spot in the local newspaper...just make sure you don't store your weed in it...

seanschevy
03-07-2012, 4:08 PM
Don't do it man.

Dorms in my experience and run by liberal idiots who want to control what adults do and treat them like children.

I couldn't stand living in a dorm patrolled by the student gestapo and the campus police. They really have nothing better to do then try to "bust" you and control how you live your life.

curtisfong
03-07-2012, 4:51 PM
Colleges are no better than elementary schools. The principal (dean, whatever) is dictator.

Kauf
03-07-2012, 7:02 PM
Like the idea of "Renting" space. Thanks for all the input guys and keeping me and my friends out of trouble :D