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View Full Version : is it me or is it


donw
02-27-2012, 1:37 PM
getting more and more bizarre out there in the land of legislators/legislation?

with people like portantino, de leon and the ludicrous legislation they propose, the arrest of the man who's kid drew a picture of a gun...to name just a few incidents that have occurred recently...where are we headed?

we now have a culture within the leadership of this country that's come to the point to where they nearly faint at the mere sight of a picture or drawing of a firearm. these folks and their following are (and have been) undermining firearms so badly now that its becoming epidemic...

is the average "rank and file" American child being taught to fear firearms so much by the media and public educations system?

this paranoia is indeed one to be watched...

the portantinos, deleons, feinsteins and their kind have to be sent packing on election day...

753X0
02-27-2012, 1:48 PM
The arrest of the man who's kid drew a picture of a gun was Canada, I believe. It is an important reminder of how things could go, here, tho.

626Tony
02-27-2012, 1:49 PM
guess theres no freedom of expression in Canada

BigDogatPlay
02-27-2012, 4:25 PM
And just when I start to think there is really no hope I see families coming out with their kids for the first time to learn safety and have fun shooting. I worked with seven brand new shooters yesterday, four of them young teenagers. The club I shoot at is busier than it's ever been on public days, lots of women and lots of kids taking up the sport.

We are winning.... we have to stay in that mindset and each of us must continue to be an advocate and an ambassador for the shooting sports. If we do that, we will triumph in the end no matter how much applesauce Messrs Portantino, de Leon and their fellow travellers can throw at us.

jrr
02-28-2012, 10:08 AM
Most Americans believe in the Second Amendment. Most of them probably own at least one gun. What we have now though is a group of "cultural elites" raised on the gun-fear mongering of the eighties and nineties who support the type of politicians who model their political careers on people like Feinstein who very successfully turned anti gun rhetoric into public facetime to further their career.

The unfortunate part is that gun rights are so below the radar for most people, especially in CA, that there is no pushback against the anti gun politicians. Instead all they get is more money and more praise from their gun fearing backers.

Most people in CA just assume, for example, that all guns are registered. So they didnt squawk at all about long gun registration. Guns here are something that everyone has, but nobody talks about, and we are told we should be a little guilty about. So the masses dont raise their voice when ant-gun laws are proposed. They already assume the laws are much more oppressive than they actually are.

Hopefully that is changing. Time will tell.

vantec08
02-28-2012, 11:12 AM
A lot of "public education" nowdays isnt education .. . its indoctrination. I used to think liberals were simply misinformed but well meaning. I have changed that to foolish and dangerous.

cvc04
02-28-2012, 12:44 PM
It's not you.

Drivedabizness
02-28-2012, 2:46 PM
Most Americans believe in the Second Amendment. Most of them probably own at least one gun. What we have now though is a group of "cultural elites" raised on the gun-fear mongering of the eighties and nineties who support the type of politicians who model their political careers on people like Feinstein who very successfully turned anti gun rhetoric into public facetime to further their career.

The unfortunate part is that gun rights are so below the radar for most people, especially in CA, that there is no pushback against the anti gun politicians. Instead all they get is more money and more praise from their gun fearing backers.

Most people in CA just assume, for example, that all guns are registered. So they didnt squawk at all about long gun registration. Guns here are something that everyone has, but nobody talks about, and we are told we should be a little guilty about. So the masses dont raise their voice when ant-gun laws are proposed. They already assume the laws are much more oppressive than they actually are.

Hopefully that is changing. Time will tell.

I think a lot of people who say they "believe in the 2nd Amendment" have a different notion of what that means than most of the folks on CalGuns.

A very good friend of mine once told me "I believe you (me) should be able to own any gun you want - but there's a lot of people out there who have no business owning a gun".

Unfortunately a lot of folks look at gun rights as a different kind of civil right than freedom of speech, or other civil rights.

They forget that a basic principle in this equation is - just as you want me to assume you are worthy to exercise your rights, I will expect you to grant the same to me.

Many of your fellow citizens see no need for anyone but law enforcement to own/carry firearms (nasty, dangerous, evil things, don't ya know).

My favorite approach is to take newbies to the range (preceeded by a good safety brief)

jwkincal
02-28-2012, 2:54 PM
A very good friend of mine once told me "I believe you (me) should be able to own any gun you want - but there's a lot of people out there who have no business owning a gun".

This is the forensic and semantic equivalent of "Some of my best friends are [minority/disabled/otherwise disadvantaged]," and it is symptomatic of the root of the problem...

And I totally agree that the best solution is to take people to the range!

marcusrn
02-29-2012, 12:17 AM
Once again none of you gun nuts ask the appropriate legal questions.

Did the offending guns that were drawn have the proper licensing, permits and registration?

Was the rugrat offender himself licensed to draw this filth?

We could be wrong on this one and foster care may be in order?

marcusrn
02-29-2012, 12:26 AM
[QUOTE=jrr;8123364]Most Americans believe in the Second Amendment.

I doubt it.

ALSystems
02-29-2012, 12:27 AM
Maybe video games like "Call of Duty" will spark a kid's interest in guns even in backward places like California.

A-J
02-29-2012, 8:22 AM
I must preface my reply wit hthe following:

IANAL. I am not a political analyst. I am also not a conpiracy theorist.

On average, most politicians support/enact legislation so they will be seen as "doing something" as opposed to doing nothing, especially when it comes to guns. The problem is that they legislation very often has little to no effect on the actual problem, but it *sounds* good and is received favorably by the public, so it's a political win. Take for example how hte antis always say how "we need to create stronger measures to keep guns out of the hands of criminals" while conveniently ignoring that the law already says that criminals can't have guns. By default then, new gun laws would only affect those of us who are already in compliance with the law.

I like to think that it's plain ignorance on their part. But if you don a tin foil hat, the argument becomes "They know exactly what they're doing, and the eventual goal is to disarm Americans (law abiding ones, anyway)." That's where it gets scary IMO.

1savage99
02-29-2012, 5:59 PM
It has gotten so bad that finger guns are banned in school, so the kids started pretending they were hitting each other with spells from wands...

Yesterday the yard duties responded by banning finger wands on the school without any prior notice, and sent four children to the wall to sit for ten minutes. At this point my son revolted because the wasn't doing anything wrong. He was then sent to the principals refusing to admitting he was wrong for the henious act of finger wanding at each other.

Now the Prinicpal, who is a good guy, is stuck telling my son that he is in trouble for not listening to the yard duty despite the rule they made up was stupid. But worse the poor guy has to call me to explain it all.

To summarize him He is still working on explaining to his staff that there is a difference between real guns and finger wands.