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View Full Version : Any Navy Corpsman that's FMF at Camp Pendleton?


nanoer
02-26-2012, 8:13 PM
I was wondering how hard was it to become a Navy Corpsman and how good are the benefits of it? I have a friend that's in the Air Force and he's a mechanic. He stated that it's easier to become a Airmen and they provide a better benefit plan than the other three branches.

I am hoping to become a Corpsman, but I also want the benefits. How's the BT and what is it like? Is there any swimming involve in the BT because I'm not a strong swimmer, I only could float but can't carry any weight. I'm not a strong of a swimmer if that is required to help the fallen.

What state is the BT in for the Navy Corpsman and how hard was the basic tests to even become a Navy Corpsman?

jaysponger
02-26-2012, 8:26 PM
What do you mean by benefits?

nanoer
02-27-2012, 12:38 AM
Opps wrong forum.. Should of been in general discussion. Jaysponger, I meant by benefits as in health, medical, wages, and retirement funds.

sephy
02-27-2012, 7:42 AM
Better yet, post in the calgunners in service forum. This information is readily available though.

The pay (http://www.militaryfactory.com/military_pay_scale.asp)
Education benefits through the GI bill. $400k life insurance is only $16 a month.
This site has good info on benefits. (http://www.navy.com/joining/benefits/pay.html)

Retirement comes after 20 years. No less.

easy
02-27-2012, 7:21 PM
Did you consider talking to a Navy Recruiter? Their job to know all that stuff.

jaysponger
02-28-2012, 7:47 PM
Opps wrong forum.. Should of been in general discussion. Jaysponger, I meant by benefits as in health, medical, wages, and retirement funds.

Same benefits for all service, google military pay. Only difference will be the special allowance i.e. if you're on a navy ship you get paid "sea pay", combat pay, etc.

Talk to a recruiter and google the info given to you. I was a recruiter and I tell all the prospects to google the info's I give them.

If your main reason in choosing the branch of service is because of money...you will hate the time you are in.

CWUSCG
02-28-2012, 8:46 PM
If your main reason in choosing the branch of service is because of money...you will hate the time you are in.

This cannot be repeated enough! Join & serve because it's a calling.....Not because of a steady pay check, otherwise you will be miserable. I promise you.

SoCalSon
02-28-2012, 10:14 PM
I was a prior Navy Hospital Corpsman station in Naval Medical Center San Diego and Camp Pendleton. My sea duties were considered being detach with the Marines like Camp Kinser, Okinawa and Camp Fuji, Japan. I don't think they count being with Marines as sea duty anymore though. Let me see can I help you with the answer your looking for.

Let me brake this down for you...

1. Pass Boot Camp (swimming requirement is not that bad, I am weak swimmer too. It consist of diving of a board, swimming a short lap, and floating without weight)
2. Hospital Corpsman (A School, NEC 0000)= It's a 3 month course of accelerated medical learning. Every basic Corpsman by the time of graduation should know how to triage, start IV, Immunization, SOAP notes, Splint and casting, draw blood, minor surgery, EMT watch, and much more. Whether you'll be any good, is up to you. Fail and become a IBM (Navy janitor :D). Upon graduation you will find yourself going through one of these three path or in combination:

A. Field Medical Service School (NEC 8404) - Most male go through this course and it's like a half of Marine Corps Boot Camp added. You'll learn Marine rank structure and going on humps etc. Now if you pass that, you'll be green lighted to roll with the Marine Corps. This is when you get the nick name "Doc" from the Marines. But that's only if they respect you or like you.
B. Going to a C school (specialty school such as X-ray, Lab, pharmacy, or other medical specialty that you added before entering the Navy in WRITTING) or If you're top of your class and haven't chosen a c school before enlisting, you get to pick a C school at this point again. Getting a c school is important and if you get one that can be easily transferred into civilian sector will be even better. I had Radiology Technologist (NEC 8452) friends that moonlighted in hospital around the base. Couple of Corpsman I have known drove around with BMW and Hummers. So yeahhh, do your research before joining.

Is being a Hospital Corpsman hard? It depends do you have any medical back ground or pick up stuff qickly. I came in knowing nothing and struggle learning everything from scratch, while some of my classmate that were emt or nurses breeze through it. I don't consider myself a naturally smart guy and I sacrifice a lot of sleepless night to pass. All corpsman are quad zero's or FMF, before your specialty. Like the Army and Marines are infantry first before there specialty.

Is there any swimming involve in the BT because I'm not a strong swimmer? There is a bare minimum swimming required and floating without weights. Don't worry, your not trying out for SEAL's. Besides, there is about 20,000 Corpsman in the Navy and only a about 2 or 3 hundred ships. Not all Corpsman will be assigned with a ship, they mainly end up stuck at a hospital, clinic or on shore with the Marine Unit. I for one never been deployed on any ship. :)

As for medical care: The Navy had paid for breaking my arm in motorcycle accident and I didn't even pay a dime. I've met Marines that their child was covered for brain surgery. We might don't make much, but we'll take care of our own Navy/Marines.