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BoJackUSMC
02-24-2012, 8:50 PM
I have a female friend who does not know anything about guns and only shot once in her life time (Glock, M&P, and 1911 9mm). She is thinking about getting a full size 1911 9mm as her first gun because recoil friendly and single stack frame. Also, she thinks 1911 is one sexy gun and everyone should have one. I am just wondering is 1911 good gun to start for someone who has no clue about firearms?

I am a huge 1911 fan:43:, but I am leaning towards more on Glock, M&P, and CZ 75B because they are so simple to use. Especially when it comes cleaning and maintenance. I know Sigs are simple gun as well, but I do not think she is ready for DA/SA style gun yet. Maybe I am wrong, what you guys think?

She really wants 9mm as her first gun because she can use it for range and home protection.

PandaLuv
02-24-2012, 8:54 PM
1911s aren't good starter guns, IMHO, even in 9mm. Mainly because it's SA only, manual safety and the field strip is rather hard.

I think M&Ps, Glocks, sig p226 and CZ75 BD are good starter guns. Simple to use, no manual safety. My vote for her would be the CZ75 BD because it looks similar to 1911 and has an awesome grip.

BoJackUSMC
02-24-2012, 9:01 PM
I also think 1911 field stripping might be too hard for her.

CWUSCG
02-24-2012, 9:02 PM
Also, she thinks 1911 is one sexy gun and everyone should have one.

Does she have any pretty, single friends that share the same opinion? :D

IMO, If she feels comfortable operating a 1911, then absolutely that's what she should get. Its one of the best handguns ever made.

G60
02-24-2012, 9:02 PM
I am just wondering is 1911 good gun to start for someone who has no clue about firearms?



No. You'll get a million people give you a million stupid reasons to try to convince you otherwise, but...no.

NapaCountyShooter
02-24-2012, 9:04 PM
It was my first handgun. Once you've mastered taking apart the 1911 as your first, all those Glocks and what not will be childs play.

CWUSCG
02-24-2012, 9:05 PM
I also think 1911 field stripping might be too hard for her.

That's why you teach her how. ;) If my sister, who's a professional violinist, can tear her 1911 down, i know your friend can.

PandaLuv
02-24-2012, 9:07 PM
No. You'll get a million people give you a million stupid reasons to try to convince you otherwise, but...no.

Sigh, no matter how much I love 1911s, I agree with you.


I also may add that 1911s are expensive and heavy. On top of that if you need all purpose piece, 1911s aren't as versatile as "modern" handguns. Wonder 9s are better service pistols, especially if she doesn't get into hobby any further than one pistol.

Dark Mod
02-24-2012, 9:12 PM
Sigh, no matter how much I love 1911s, I agree with you.


I also may add that 1911s are expensive and heavy. On top of that if you need all purpose piece, 1911s aren't as versatile as "modern" handguns. Wonder 9s are better service pistols, especially if she doesn't get into hobby any further than one pistol.

Thats what i was thinking: 1911's are a little expensive for someones first gun, if you dont end up enjoying the hobby, your in it for like $800. Theres nothing wrong with a glock or even a hi point

Unforgiven
02-24-2012, 9:13 PM
One thing I have learned is to stop telling your Gf or wife what they want. If she wants a 1911 in 9mm. she should get one. It's up to you to teach her how to take care of it. It is a simple gun, the is easy to shoot, that is what made it so popular for 100 years. If the Army can teach a knuckle head to field strip it, you should be able to teach your GF. Maybe you should watch this video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFaS-2SM6WU

Snapping Twig
02-24-2012, 9:16 PM
With enough training, but barring that - not so much.

Something in a 4" revolver is more appropriate IMO.

Semi autos for beginners aren't optimum for many reasons - complexity, safety (is it loaded?) function, jams, etc.

I've trained close to 100 nuggets with a 1911, but they get 40 hours class time before they ever see a live round and even then, there are those...

Let her try a revolver.

redcliff
02-24-2012, 9:16 PM
I personally steer new shooters towards 4-6" revolvers typically.

However, I don't feel a Glock is any safer than a 1911. All handguns require instruction on proper use and safe gun handling. If she chooses a 1911 though she needs to be more mechanically inclined and it will require more maintenance. The reward though is a great trigger unmatched by most pistols and a grip that can be tailored to her hand size via the use of short triggers and slim grips.

InGrAM
02-24-2012, 9:20 PM
If she really wants one, then it is her decision.

If you have a good teacher and you are taught right, I do not see a problem with starting out with 1911's. I was, at a very early age.

If she is not serious about learning and giving it a 110%, I wouldn't go near a 1911 though. Females love 1911's but they really are not good guns for people that know little to nothing about firearms.

I would lead her towards a good striker-fired M&P or a good solid DA/SA 9mm pistol.

MA2
02-24-2012, 9:22 PM
I vote for yes, get what you want (or she wants in this case).
Just have some properly teach the platform.

hyperion.excal
02-24-2012, 9:24 PM
i started with a 1911 it wasnt that hard to learn. field strip is simple as long as you understand how to and know what you are doing.

When i got sig sauers as my 2nd and 3rd handgun and it was harder to for me to completely disassemble them.

Another good thing about 1911 is that they have safety, beginners understanding of safety is always priority, this helps build up the basic fundamentals of handling firearms.

G60
02-24-2012, 9:35 PM
Have her read this:
http://www.10-8performance.com/pages/1911-User's-Guide.html

If she's still up for it, it's still probably not the right choice.

puRe59
02-24-2012, 9:39 PM
The 1911 was my first. I don't know...there's just so many things about it that stick out from the rest. I preferred the SA on the 1911 because it made it easier to shoot, but now I want to shoot DA triggers to get better practice. I actually hated shooting revolvers when I first got into guns. It felt awkward to shoot compared to the semi-autos, but now I want one!

edit: btw, how long has she been shooting for? I bought my gun 8-9 months after I fired one for the first time, and I was going almost every month. I now go every week :D. It might be best to spend more time at the range, and maybe she'll change her mind. I know I did. I first bought a 1911 9mm, but after 3 months sold it for a 1911 .45acp

Fishslayer
02-24-2012, 9:50 PM
The U.S. military started out a few beginners with 1911s in .45ACP over the years.

If she really wants a 1911 then she has excellent taste in weaponry & should get one.:cool:

Oceanbob
02-24-2012, 9:52 PM
If she can rack the slide of a 1911 then she can rack a Glock 19.

;)

BoJackUSMC
02-24-2012, 9:56 PM
She only shot once in her life time so far and it was 2 months ago.

PandaLuv
02-24-2012, 9:59 PM
She only shot once in her life time so far and it was 2 months ago.

OK, I think I know why she likes 1911s more, glocks and M&P have more recoil than the 1911, for obvious reasons.

Get her a p226 or a CZ75 BD, those are some heavy 9mm service pistols, I bet you she will reconsider.

Fishslayer
02-24-2012, 10:00 PM
If she can rack the slide of a 1911 then she can rack a Glock 19.

;)

Well... they ARE easier to clean. Toss 'em in the dishwasher & GTG. :D

NSR500
02-24-2012, 10:08 PM
If she's serious then I see nothing wrong with a 1911. The truth is that people who challenge themselves to learn will be better in the long run.

cannon
02-24-2012, 10:19 PM
If she wants a 1911 in 9mm then why not?

Do you think she's going to want to go shooting with a gun she didn't want and doesn't like?

gun toting monkeyboy
02-24-2012, 10:21 PM
No. The 1911 is not for beginners. It has too many things going on with it. I love 1911s, but there is a time and a place for them. The US Military trained millions of people how to use muzzle loading muskets as well, so that isn't really a valid argument. For a first gun, you want simple and reliable. Most of the Glock-style automatics offer that. I personally like the grips on the M&P, but you should have her try to hold (or better yet, shoot) several models before she decides. And have her try a plain old vanilla .38 revolver with a 4-6 inch barrel too. They aren't sexy, but they are one of the best guns out there for teaching the basics. You can normally pick up used ones on GB for under $200. If it is a C&R, you can even get it sent here. ;)

-Mb

brian5271
02-24-2012, 10:36 PM
There is nothing wrong with a 1911 for your first gun. My dad taught me how to shoot with a 1911 when I was 10. If an idiot like me can do it, anybody can! :hurray:

Is a 1911 harder to maintain or field strip than a Glock or M&P? Yes. Is it rocket science? No.

That being said, since she has only shot once, it would be a good idea to take to a range and have her rent several different guns. She might find one she likes better.

The type of gun does not matter nearly so much as proper training. Get her what she is comfortable with and she will shoot it better, more often, and have more fun doing it. The important thing is to teach her proper safety techniques once she has it, no matter what she gets.

Just my two cents worth.

cwin
02-24-2012, 11:14 PM
IMHO, I think any handgun is ok for a first handgun if you have any common sense and you are willing to train. True, a 1911 has a certain manual of arms but how hard is it really?

pepsi2451
02-24-2012, 11:38 PM
I don't see anything wrong with a 1911 for a first handgun. I don't buy that their to complicated, it isn't rocket science. She should get whatever she wants, learn to use it, and practice with it.

Freq18Hz
02-25-2012, 12:44 AM
I have a female friend who does not know anything about guns and only shot once in her life time (Glock, M&P, and 1911 9mm). She is thinking about getting a full size 1911 9mm as her first gun because recoil friendly and single stack frame. Also, she thinks 1911 is one sexy gun and everyone should have one. I am just wondering is 1911 good gun to start for someone who has no clue about firearms?

I am a huge 1911 fan:43:, but I am leaning towards more on Glock, M&P, and CZ 75B because they are so simple to use. Especially when it comes cleaning and maintenance. I know Sigs are simple gun as well, but I do not think she is ready for DA/SA style gun yet. Maybe I am wrong, what you guys think?

She really wants 9mm as her first gun because she can use it for range and home protection.

Tell her to get a revolver. .38 special

-Freq

BoJackUSMC
02-25-2012, 7:15 AM
Okay members, she really wants to train with 1911 so I am going to help her. Even when she could barely rack the slide, but she really likes 1911. I just need to teach her right and take her to the range once a month if possible. I know 9mm 1911 is little expensive, but thankfully money is not issue to her right now. She makes good money so she can afford to buy one without breaking her bank account.

I am going to let her practice with my 1911 9mm for little while before making her go buy one.

Snoopy47
02-25-2012, 7:37 AM
A 45 caliber is not a good starting gun. A 1911 platform is perfectly fine as a starting plat form. Whatever a beginner starts on should be constant because motor skill repetition is more important than platform type.

So a 1911 converted 22 would be perfect.

The ironic similarity between all guns is they should be dealt with the same in regard to the 4 rules. So 1911, DA revolver, or Glock it doesn’t matter. But the 45ACP is not a good beginner round.

ap3572001
02-25-2012, 7:39 AM
I have a female friend who does not know anything about guns and only shot once in her life time (Glock, M&P, and 1911 9mm). She is thinking about getting a full size 1911 9mm as her first gun because recoil friendly and single stack frame. Also, she thinks 1911 is one sexy gun and everyone should have one. I am just wondering is 1911 good gun to start for someone who has no clue about firearms?

I am a huge 1911 fan:43:, but I am leaning towards more on Glock, M&P, and CZ 75B because they are so simple to use. Especially when it comes cleaning and maintenance. I know Sigs are simple gun as well, but I do not think she is ready for DA/SA style gun yet. Maybe I am wrong, what you guys think?

She really wants 9mm as her first gun because she can use it for range and home protection.

If properly trained , I see no problems with 1911.

bczrx
02-25-2012, 8:23 AM
A 1911 takes dedication to maintain and operate properly. There are other designs that don't take as much work. Revolvers are probably best for someone who just wants a gun for SD and won't go to the range more than once a year, or practice dry-firing [unloaded of course].

IF she is willing to do the work, then a 1911 is fine. If she isn't willing to do the work on training/operating/cleaning, then she is better served by something else.

I've never launched a recoil spring from my Glock or M&P. I've launched them a few times with my 1911s, and I try to pay attention.


Now, another thought since she wants 9mm. Yes, there are some 9mm 1911s out there. I know there are some members with definite thoughts on reliability with that cartridge in a 1911. But, why not see if she likes the Browning Hi Power? 10 rounds of 9mm in a SA pistol with an external thumb safety that has a great history behind it also.

The one drawback to the Hi Power is the trigger: no matter how much you spend on it the trigger won't be as good as spending the same amount on a 1911. It can be improved on relatively easily: I worked on one of my Hi Powers and have it at a 4lb 9oz trigger that is smooth, by removing the mag disconnect and changing springs. That puts it as light as 2 of my 1911s and lighter than a third. However, the reset is longer. BTW, factory BHP triggers are in the 7-9lb range and the mag disconnect makes them feel gritty. Try pulling the trigger with the mag out to see what removing it does to the smoothness.

Just a thought.

Roach_Infinity
02-25-2012, 8:30 AM
In a perfect world, you give the shooter the information & experience they need to make an educated decision about what firearm, or firearms are right for them. Why rush into a first purchase when you don't have to?

-Eric

animossity
02-25-2012, 8:33 AM
1911 was my first pistol, if she wants it then its a good choice. I didn't think it was that difficult to strip. As long as she can rack the slide comfortably it should be fine.

PandaLuv
02-25-2012, 8:45 AM
Okay members, she really wants to train with 1911 so I am going to help her. Even when she could barely rack the slide, but she really likes 1911. I just need to teach her right and take her to the range once a month if possible. I know 9mm 1911 is little expensive, but thankfully money is not issue to her right now. She makes good money so she can afford to buy one without breaking her bank account.

I am going to let her practice with my 1911 9mm for little while before making her go buy one.

Make sure to take pics!

fanof1911forlife
02-25-2012, 1:58 PM
I think the 1911 is a perfect starter pistol. Although I would recommend a bobtailed commander-sized for your female friend instead of going full-sized if she has small hands and the weight may be too much for her.

SilverTauron
02-25-2012, 6:57 PM
She wants a 1911 for her first gun. That means she's doing better than about 90% of new shooters these days, myself included.

Two words to chime in with here. One, get it in .45 ACP. The recoil of a standard pressure .45 ACP round is better to my senses than a +P 9mm.

The second word is that her next purchase should be a traditional double action handgun. We live in litigious times ,and outside of the 1911 and Browning Hi-power handguns not many firms offer pistols with Condition 1 carrying as an option. Learning how to accurately shoot a TDA pistol comes in handy, as it allows a gun owner to be able to accurately shoot nearly every pistol sold on the marketplace today. It is difficult to do but once the Traditonal Double Action trigger is 'mastered' its not a skill one should lose. A shottist can go from a TDA handgun to a Condition 1 pistol, but the reverse is not an easy transition.

While a 1911 is a great gun, Im glad it wasn't my first gun for that reason. The last kind of shooter I want to be is the guy who flees from a double action pistol like a vampire from garlic because i've only been shooting Single Action for so long.

Sac-AR15
02-25-2012, 8:41 PM
Nothing wrong with a 1911 for a first gun. Great gun.

agent.5
02-25-2012, 9:25 PM
Life is too short to pull ****ty trigger. Get a 1911.

hcbr
02-25-2012, 9:28 PM
1911 for a first, yeah i'll think to reconsider

psango
02-25-2012, 9:31 PM
My first handgun was a 1911, but that was back in the days when you either got a Colt 1911 or a Smith & Wesson revolver. Glocks were not even invented yet and most cars had a 3 speed column shift.

oddjob
02-25-2012, 11:34 PM
If a 9mm 1911 is what she wants and you have one to let her use good for you! It probably wouldn't hurt to gather a few more different 9mm's, but a 1911 is a good gun. She is correct about the 1911 being a sexy gun!

My 15 yr old daughter shot her first USPSA match with my 9mm 1911. I taught her the mechanics of the gun for about 30 minutes. She liked it and shot well with it. The lower recoil, lower noise, easy trigger and the weight of the gun were all contributing factors.

good luck!!

USMC 82-86
02-26-2012, 9:53 AM
With enough training, but barring that - not so much.

Something in a 4" revolver is more appropriate IMO.

Semi autos for beginners aren't optimum for many reasons - complexity, safety (is it loaded?) function, jams, etc.

I've trained close to 100 nuggets with a 1911, but they get 40 hours class time before they ever see a live round and even then, there are those...

Let her try a revolver.

I also think a revolver is better for a first gun if it is being used for defense in the home. It is simple to operate and the trigger is often very good. Under stress I just think it is a much more simple platform for someone with no experience. If however she is set on that particular gun she will feel more comfortable with what appeals to her and more apt to practice more to get better.

Appeal is a individual thing whether it be aesthetics or performance of a gun. I really like the dependability the Glock provides and the ease of use plus it is more than accurate enough for the intended use, physically it is not very appealing but I have come to enjoy the performance so much it outweighs the looks of the gun so I find it appealing for my purpose. You should be able to get her squared away in the use of that platform if she invest the time to train she should be fine.

chickenfried
02-26-2012, 10:07 AM
Take her shooting some more with a variety of guns. If the 1911's still the one after she's got some more range time, cool. She's the one buying it and she found what she likes. Sounds like a better thought process than some people go through for their first purchase saw it in that movie, heard our military uses it, heard cops use it, heard.... :p.

Striker
02-26-2012, 10:52 AM
I have a female friend who does not know anything about guns and only shot once in her life time (Glock, M&P, and 1911 9mm). She is thinking about getting a full size 1911 9mm as her first gun because recoil friendly and single stack frame. Also, she thinks 1911 is one sexy gun and everyone should have one. I am just wondering is 1911 good gun to start for someone who has no clue about firearms?

I am a huge 1911 fan:43:, but I am leaning towards more on Glock, M&P, and CZ 75B because they are so simple to use. Especially when it comes cleaning and maintenance. I know Sigs are simple gun as well, but I do not think she is ready for DA/SA style gun yet. Maybe I am wrong, what you guys think?

She really wants 9mm as her first gun because she can use it for range and home protection.

I think the 1911 is a great pistol in the right hands, but when guys who have a lot of rounds downrange with them say a 9mm 1911 is too finicky for serious use, I would listen. Hilton Yam uses an M&P 9mm because he says, with a thumb safety, it's close enough to 1911 for practice and much easier to keep running. LAV says they're great range toys, but not suited for hard use. My point is that, if she's going to stake her life on it, either get a good 1911 in .45 or look to something else in 9mm. If it's just a range gun, let her get what she wants and what she'll keep shooting. She'll learn how to field strip it. If done correctly, it's really not that difficult.

Press Check
02-26-2012, 11:38 AM
I think the 1911 is a great pistol in the right hands, but when guys who have a lot of rounds downrange with them say a 9mm 1911 is too finicky for serious use, I would listen. Hilton Yam uses an M&P 9mm because he says, with a thumb safety, it's close enough to 1911 for practice and much easier to keep running. LAV says they're great range toys, but not suited for hard use. My point is that, if she's going to stake her life on it, either get a good 1911 in .45 or look to something else in 9mm. If it's just a range gun, let her get what she wants and what she'll keep shooting. She'll learn how to field strip it. If done correctly, it's really not that difficult.

If we're talking about production pistols, 1911's in general are finicky, not just the 9mm. Some will run flawlessly out of the box, and others will require some fine tuning by a Smith.

G60
02-26-2012, 12:08 PM
And if you still think they're a good platform for a beginner, read Hilton Yam's latest AAR for his latest 1911 duty class:
http://10-8performance.blogspot.com/2012/02/bellevue-1911-class-aar.html?m=1

17 out of 19 student pistols needed work to be brought to proper functional spec during the class, 1 could not be fixed with the tools on hand, and keep in mind 9mm 1911's are even more finicky.

Press Check
02-26-2012, 12:58 PM
And if you still think they're a good platform for a beginner, read Hilton Yam's latest AAR for his latest 1911 duty class:
http://10-8performance.blogspot.com/2012/02/bellevue-1911-class-aar.html?m=1

17 out of 19 student pistols needed work to be brought to proper functional spec during the class, 1 could not be fixed with the tools on hand, and keep in mind 9mm 1911's are even more finicky.

I must have missed where a 9mm was mentioned in that article. :rolleyes:

Again, production 1911's are finicky, not just 9mm's, and if anything, that blog proves that most production 1911's need the attention of a Smith. In short, a reliability package.

brian5271
02-26-2012, 2:28 PM
Again, production 1911's are finicky, not just 9mm's, and if anything, that blog proves that most production 1911's need the attention of a Smith. In short, a reliability package.



Part of the reason 1911’s are so finicky is that they are made by everyone. Some companies have horrible QA, some have good QA. If, for example, if the M&P design was made by a lot of different companies, it would not be as reliable as it is now. What I mean is that Smith &Wesson has good quality control. If a third party made a cheap knock off of the M&P, it may not be as reliable. If a hundred other companies made the M&P, you can be sure that there will be problems with some of them.

If you by a S&W 1911(or other quality manufacture) you are much less likely to have problems with it. It is not the design of the 1911 that makes it so finicky as it is poor quality control at some factories.

Just me opinion.

The War Wagon
02-26-2012, 2:33 PM
I have a female friend who does not know anything about guns and only shot once in her life time (Glock, M&P, and 1911 9mm). She is thinking about getting a full size 1911 9mm as her first gun because recoil friendly and single stack frame. Also, she thinks 1911 is one sexy gun and...

FAIL! :facepalm:

She'd be better served with a revolver. Or a Ruger Mk.II. Guns are NOT 'sexy' - they are inanimate tools. One she masters the basics, then she can move from 'crawling' to 'walking.'

redcliff
02-26-2012, 2:37 PM
And if you still think they're a good platform for a beginner, read Hilton Yam's latest AAR for his latest 1911 duty class:
http://10-8performance.blogspot.com/2012/02/bellevue-1911-class-aar.html?m=1

17 out of 19 student pistols needed work to be brought to proper functional spec during the class, 1 could not be fixed with the tools on hand, and keep in mind 9mm 1911's are even more finicky.

Counted among these deficiencies were stripped hex head grip screws... give me a friggin break, and extractor profiling and tension adjustment (to Hilton's specs, and before the pistols were even fired in the class; I've seen 1911's run with a fairly wide range of extractor tension). At least he does admit that "Many of the required fixes were simple and only took me a few minutes in the classroom. After these easy adjustments, the same guns performed well on the range."

Certainly a few of the problems were more serious, and some are problems I've encountered on Kimbers to be honest; premature slide locking due to improperly dimensioned slide stops and problems with the 4" Pro models which often require a special longer Wolff XP recoil spring due to insufficent spring tension at battery.

mikey357
02-26-2012, 2:44 PM
I have a female friend who does not know anything about guns and only shot once in her life time (Glock, M&P, and 1911 9mm). She is thinking about getting a full size 1911 9mm as her first gun because recoil friendly and single stack frame. Also, she thinks 1911 is one sexy gun and everyone should have one. I am just wondering is 1911 good gun to start for someone who has no clue about firearms?

I am a huge 1911 fan:43:, but I am leaning towards more on Glock, M&P, and CZ 75B because they are so simple to use. Especially when it comes cleaning and maintenance. I know Sigs are simple gun as well, but I do not think she is ready for DA/SA style gun yet. Maybe I am wrong, what you guys think?

She really wants 9mm as her first gun because she can use it for range and home protection.

This might help
http://corneredcat.com/Rack_the_Slide/

Databyter
02-26-2012, 2:45 PM
You guys seem to be focused on breakdown ease.

For a starter gun I think 1911 is fine, because they are heavy and solid enough to defeat recoil quite a bit, and feel nice in the hand.

In short they are good shooters.

Anybody can learn how to break down anything unless they are unusually weak, which I am not going to assume.

my $.02

p.s. It was the gun I learned on, and I was young and slim at the time. I had no issues with breakdown or firing it. I loved it.

This was the first hand weapon that thousands of soldiers learned to fire. And it's ease of use was one of the reasons it was designed the way it was, and was chosen.

jonzer77
02-27-2012, 7:38 AM
Counted among these deficiencies were stripped hex head grip screws... give me a friggin break, and extractor profiling and tension adjustment (to Hilton's specs, and before the pistols were even fired in the class; I've seen 1911's run with a fairly wide range of extractor tension). At least he does admit that "Many of the required fixes were simple and only took me a few minutes in the classroom. After these easy adjustments, the same guns performed well on the range."

Certainly a few of the problems were more serious, and some are problems I've encountered on Kimbers to be honest; premature slide locking due to improperly dimensioned slide stops and problems with the 4" Pro models which often require a special longer Wolff XP recoil spring due to insufficent spring tension at battery.

Don't worry, G60 just likes to troll in 1911 treads. Welcome back redcliff, haven't seen you around in a while.

redcliff
02-27-2012, 7:54 AM
Don't worry, G60 just likes to troll in 1911 treads. Welcome back redcliff, haven't seen you around in a while.

I wasn't faulting G60 for posting it, its just that I thought Hilton Yam's article seems beneath him (considerring his talent as a pistol smith) to include such questionable "malfunctions" that weren't.

Thanks for the welcome back. I lost my best friend/shooting partner of 38 years in December and it's taken a while to face going to the range alone and getting back into shooting.

jonzer77
02-27-2012, 8:13 AM
I wasn't faulting G60 for posting it, its just that I thought Hilton Yam's article seems beneath him (considerring his talent as a pistol smith) to include such questionable "malfunctions" that weren't.

Thanks for the welcome back. I lost my best friend/shooting partner of 38 years in December and it's taken a while to face going to the range alone and getting back into shooting.

My condolences Redcliff, I am sure that he lived a good life and was blessed to have a good friend for so many years.

redcliff
02-27-2012, 8:16 AM
Thanks very much Jonzer, and sorry for the thread-jack everyone. I"ll stay on-topic now.

Nate G
02-27-2012, 8:17 AM
My first was a 1911 because I knew I hated other trigger pulls compared to a 1911's. Basic field strip was simple to learn especially with all the you tube videos. Taking apart the trigger,hammer etc.. Is much harder to learn. Have her buy snap caps and dry fire the crap out of it before she shoots and she'll be good IMO

23 Blast
02-27-2012, 8:26 AM
With enough training, but barring that - not so much.

Something in a 4" revolver is more appropriate IMO.

Semi autos for beginners aren't optimum for many reasons - complexity, safety (is it loaded?) function, jams, etc.

I've trained close to 100 nuggets with a 1911, but they get 40 hours class time before they ever see a live round and even then, there are those...

Let her try a revolver.

This. I think a double-action revolver in .357 is probably the best all-around, all-purpose gun there is, especially for someone who isn't a gun enthusiast and isn't likely to spend much time on training and/or maintenance.

As far as a 1911 being a good first gun - well TBH almost any gun is a relatively simple affair, for anyone willing to put in at least a few hours familiarizing themselves with the takedown, reassembly, and manual of arms. Plenty of GI's probably were issued the 1911 as their first handgun. But for the reasons I stated, I do think a DA revolver is about as ideal as it gets for a beginner. No take down at all is really necessary, cleaning is straightforward and easy, there's no magazines to lose, no levers to manipulate, no failure drills to rehearse, and a revolver left in a sock drawer for years can be relied on to function when needed without having to worry about worn springs or gummed oil on the slide rails.