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postal
02-24-2012, 9:08 AM
I dont have a safe yet. It's one of many things on the list to get. But I was thinking about installing my own fire sprinkler system over the safe to cool the safe if a fire occurred.

I was thinking about a "temporary" install that could be removed easily if code enforcement found it.

Run a regular lawn sprinkler valve to thick wall copper 1" tubing through the attic above the safe, with fire sprinkler nozzles into the closet that holds the safe.

The valve would be outside for access in a fire, but hidden or locked so no one floods the house accidentally.

Although the heat from a fire goes up.... if the sprinkler system has a high flow of water, the water would cool the pipe/solder joints and would withstand a very high temperature, so the system "should" last quite a bit longer than people would think in a fire. And of course the water would cool the safe until the roof came down, and busts up the pipe.

Interesting idea? waste of time?

LikeAllGuns
02-24-2012, 9:18 AM
I like it a lot. you have thought of the heat factor with copper pipe. I'm sure there will be haters only cause they didn't think of it.

Add a heat censor to open water valve. You might not be there to open water valve.

Good luck I want to work on it myself. I live in the trees and this summer is already freaking me out. We need rain.

theduece
02-24-2012, 9:27 AM
Why not ditch the lawn sprinkler valve and install a regular fire sprinkler?

I would forget the manual valve idea alltogether just hard pipe it in, no valve to get turned off.

theduece
02-24-2012, 9:29 AM
O and for one sprinkler in a closet, 1/2" pipe would suffice. Running the system in copper is not an issue, there is also a plastic pipe(blazemaster) that is legal to do it with.

alfred1222
02-24-2012, 10:30 AM
just out of curiosity, why not just get a safe that is fire resistant for something like 3 hours?? i like the sprinkler idea, but i just cant wrap my head around the concept of drilling a hole into the top of my safe. but if u decide to do it, post up pictures!

Decoligny
02-24-2012, 10:55 AM
just out of curiosity, why not just get a safe that is fire resistant for something like 3 hours?? i like the sprinkler idea, but i just cant wrap my head around the concept of drilling a hole into the top of my safe. but if u decide to do it, post up pictures!

It a sprinkler system OVER the safe, not a sprinkler system INSIDE the safe. :rolleyes:

No drilling a hole in the top of the safe so you can fill it with water if a fire breaks out.

oldsmoboat
02-24-2012, 10:56 AM
Maybe a Halon system but I wouldn't want to introduce water to my guns. Might spring a leak and be a while before you noticed and then you have a pile of rusty guns. Might as well let them burn and file an insurance claim.

EDIT:
OVER, not in. Oops.

NeenachGuy
02-24-2012, 11:08 AM
Sprinklers are a great idea. When we built our home, we installed fire sprinklers in every room, and one of the sprinklers is directly above the gun safe. Just make sure you do it right... The sprinkler system needs to have its own connection to the water main coming into the house, and it needs to have a valve that maintains the proper pressure in the event that the water main is busted.

medicdude
02-24-2012, 11:14 AM
FIL is building a new house and apparently by code sprinklers are required over a certain sq footage. They're all over the house including in the safe closet.

Flyin Brian
02-24-2012, 12:11 PM
Since the government failed to pass legislation requiring reinforced floors in boats, I am unable to participate in this discussion on gun safes :(

Ubermcoupe
02-24-2012, 12:39 PM
Iím for a sprinkler system, especially as an added protection to fire retardant safes.
The only preventative factor I can think of is the cost.
Anyone have tips on getting an affordable system implemented?
Last time I check it out it wasnít cheap.

Since the government failed to pass legislation requiring reinforced floors in boats, I am unable to participate in this discussion on gun safes :(

That story sounds like it deserves its own thread (with pictures) in the OT section. :)

cabinetguy
02-24-2012, 1:12 PM
if you do it, you had better run piping that can handle the heat from a fire. I think most sprinkler systems use galv piping, since copper has a lower melting point. a sprinkler does no good if water cant get to it. Another idea would firewall the room it is in, I beleive a 2 hr firewall for a garage is 2 sheets of 5/8 drywall, that might buy some time for the room the safe is in

Smoothiesd
02-24-2012, 2:01 PM
My dad had a safe delivered a couple of months ago and the driver gave him a tip for a redneck fire sprinkler over a safe. He said alot of his customers put 6 to 8 cases of bottled water on top of the safe thinking that the head would melt the bottles causing the water to run down the safe.

Shellshocker66
02-24-2012, 2:11 PM
How about just placing an automatic fire extinguisher in the safe? They are set to go off at 175 degrees and blankets the area with non-water/no powder residue halon replacement.

http://www.fireboy-xintex.com/MA2-fire-extinguisher.htm

Available at Western Marine. http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=96210&catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=11151&storeNum=50469&subdeptNum=50502&classNum=50504

BrokerB
02-24-2012, 3:07 PM
Buy a safe

Put 5gallon water jugs on top. They will melt and reduce heat on your safe.., maybe - ..which you do not own yet

Anyone who does not have their killing machines locked when they are not under direct supervision is a danger to society.

chiselchst
02-24-2012, 3:19 PM
I smiled when I saw this post!

Yes! I even bought a couple of commercial heat-operating fire sprinklers. The color of the heat sensitive fuse determines the temperature at which it melts, allowing water to spray. My plan was to mount one above the safe. Haven't gotten around to it, partially because I have a safe that will survive a home burn down.

Had second thoughts also, re water damage...and I also double sheet-rocked the closest sides & roof, and put 3 layers down under the safe, to help.

Might still do it. I like overkill for important stuff :43:

wjc
02-24-2012, 3:53 PM
Maybe a Halon system but I wouldn't want to introduce water to my guns. Might spring a leak and be a while before you noticed and then you have a pile of rusty guns. Might as well let them burn and file an insurance claim.

EDIT:
OVER, not in. Oops.

^^ this would be a better idea.

We used Halon in computer labs when water would have destroyed the contents of the room.

Halon is kind of expensive but it would be cool if someone developed a small system. Something like a small tank and discharger that can be triggered by heat.

theduece
02-24-2012, 4:06 PM
Sprinklers are a great idea. When we built our home, we installed fire sprinklers in every room, and one of the sprinklers is directly above the gun safe. Just make sure you do it right... The sprinkler system needs to have its own connection to the water main coming into the house, and it needs to have a valve that maintains the proper pressure in the event that the water main is busted.

I do this for a living. On residential there should be NO shut off valve. It should tee off after the meter, prior to house shut off.

FIL is building a new house and apparently by code sprinklers are required over a certain sq footage. They're all over the house including in the safe closet.

Yep the square footage varies by locallity.

Iím for a sprinkler system, especially as an added protection to fire retardant safes.
The only preventative factor I can think of is the cost.
Anyone have tips on getting an affordable system implemented?
Last time I check it out it wasnít cheap.



That story sounds like it deserves its own thread (with pictures) in the OT section. :)

Coverage for a complete house will get prohibitve.

if you do it, you had better run piping that can handle the heat from a fire. I think most sprinkler systems use galv piping, since copper has a lower melting point. a sprinkler does no good if water cant get to it. Another idea would firewall the room it is in, I beleive a 2 hr firewall for a garage is 2 sheets of 5/8 drywall, that might buy some time for the room the safe is in

Copper is an approved method of piping believe it or not so is cpvc pipe. The water filled pipe will not melt... If it does you have more problems.

^^ this would be a better idea.

We used Halon in computer labs when water would have destroyed the contents of the room.

Halon is kind of expensive but it would be cool if someone developed a small system. Something like a small tank and discharger that can be triggered by heat.

They make small halon systems for auto racing and boats. It will not lower the temperature though.

IMHO if I am understanding the op correctly, his intention is outside the safe dropping water on it to keep it cool. The sprinkler will do this.

The King
02-24-2012, 4:33 PM
Consider placing the safe in your garage and tapping into the water heater plumbing.
Cheap & dirty. And reversable.

Though I would like "TheDuece"s comments.

blakdawg
02-24-2012, 5:09 PM
I've worked in Halon-equipped computer rooms - my understanding was that the Halon is intended to suppress the initial outbreak of a fire, but isn't going to be effective protection if the area to be protected is adjacent to a building that's otherwise already on fire.

So the Halon might be nice if you think your guns (or your goldenrod, or whatever) are going to *start* a fire - but I am skeptical that it would be a big help if the rest of your house is already burning, as the Halon is likely to dissipate pretty quickly, and it works by displacing oxygen which would otherwise allow a fire to burn.

The bottled water on top is an interesting idea - we all ought to have a lot of bottled water available anyway, in case of <pick your own scenario>, but storing it on top of the safe gets you a free fire protection bonus.

hunteran
02-24-2012, 7:42 PM
I've worked in Halon-equipped computer rooms - my understanding was that the Halon is intended to suppress the initial outbreak of a fire, but isn't going to be effective protection if the area to be protected is adjacent to a building that's otherwise already on fire.

Yeah, a Halon system isn't going to do jack to keep your guns cool. What you're really looking for is a way to slow down the heat transfer. The two big ways you could do this is slowing the conduction of heat through your safe (insulation) or using some sort of evaporating coolant to absorb the heat before your safe (and your guns) absorbs the heat (which buys you time). I don't think the bottles of water on top would help all that much (because once the bottle melts most of that water is going to end up on the floor where it won't do much good). I think your best bet would be to have some sort of system that hoses down the outside of your safe with a ****load of water.

theduece
02-24-2012, 7:55 PM
You are correct. Halon will extinguish a fire inside of a safe. It will not extinguish a house fire. Unless you have a system throughout the entire house. It will not cool down the temperature. It works by displacing oxygen.


In all reality it is a simple system to design(the sprinkler option). All you need to do is tap into your plumbing, run a 1/2" or larger line over to your safe, install a sprinkler in the end.

Leaks do happen but are rare, almost every large commercial building has several sprinkler systems in it. Just make sure you don't get your water turned off and yours will work.

greezy
02-24-2012, 8:36 PM
it is highly recomended you never touch your sprinkler system. i deal with them all the time installing alarms in houses. we had a guy drill through one and my company bought a house. resi sprinklers are running at 600 psi and it will be a very bad day if you goof something up and it breaks when your not home. strange enough those super old school glass grenades is what i keep near my safe. yes they were made in 1910 but when i threw one in a firepit in my backyard the fire was no more. some have a heat activated trigger kinda like a mouse trap that breaks the glass in the case of heat. google glass fire grenade and you can find them.

theduece
02-24-2012, 8:47 PM
No they do not operate at anything near 600psi. At most they are tested at 200psi. They operate at the exact same pressure you have at your water meter.


I would not recommend anyone mess with thier existing system, only in case a fire ever happened. Someone may or may not get upset.

Safety1st
02-25-2012, 12:24 AM
Seems the easiest and cheapest thing to do is build a thick drywall storage closet. Its best if the heat never gets to your safe.

postal
02-25-2012, 11:44 AM
I'm planning on getting a Sturdy Fire Lined safe in the future. Best bang for the buck I hear.

As others mentioned, Halon will snuff out a fire in a contained room- does nothing for the heat though. I doubt halon is even legal in a residence.... It will kill you faster than a fire and smoke would- I had Halon systems in my computer room in the military.

Good info TheDuece- thanks for your input.

My "day job" does require me to work with thickwall copper piping once in a while- I'm not worried about installing a single line with perhaps 2 heads on it- (more heads = more water flow- cooling the pipe better, and cooling the safe better. Or would that matter at all, tapping off the water before the regulator for full pressure?

As to Jerry rigging a "temporary- unapproved- un inspected - un permitted... easily to remove setup" is a simple thing for me to accomplish. I would need real fire sprinkler heads for all metal construction- naturally. Which means I could consider leave out the valve, and have the system pressurized all the time. The down side of a constantly pressurized system, is if there is a leak and it floods the house without a fire.... then dealing with insurance and my "jerry rigged" unapproved system....

The guy living on the boat.... in case of fire... drop safe through bottom of hull....:) Thats why Navy Nuke boats have the reactors at the very bottom of the ship- in case of meltdown, they melt right out the bottom of the ship.

For the poster that said since I dont have a safe, I'm irresponsible.... No kids in the house, the live in GF knows how to use all my guns, and I dont think my dog, or her cat will have a ND... Currently they just arent protected from fire or theft besides my insurance policy. And that safe I want is beyond my finances at this time- but it's "on the list" of things.

1911su16b870
02-25-2012, 11:52 AM
Place your emergency water supply plastic bottles/crates on top of your safe. A friend and calgunner told me this and IMO the best, simplest solution.

The Gleam
02-25-2012, 1:26 PM
My "day job" does require me to work with thickwall copper piping once in a while- I'm not worried about installing a single line with perhaps 2 heads on it- (more heads = more water flow- cooling the pipe better, and cooling the safe better. Or would that matter at all, tapping off the water before the regulator for full pressure?

As to Jerry rigging a "temporary- unapproved- un inspected - un permitted... easily to remove setup" is a simple thing for me to accomplish. I would need real fire sprinkler heads for all metal construction- naturally. Which means I could consider leave out the valve, and have the system pressurized all the time. The down side of a constantly pressurized system, is if there is a leak and it floods the house without a fire.... then dealing with insurance and my "jerry rigged" unapproved system....

The guy living on the boat.... in case of fire... drop safe through bottom of hull....:)


Good ideas. But also think "Earthquake Sprinkler Leakage" or the system leaking from pressure over time. Be sure the system you install is not simply jerry-rigged, and that the room for the safe won't fill up with water to the point it leaks into the safe causing water damage.

I supposed that's better than fire damage, but if you're gone for several hours or even a few days, you would have a mess on your hands for the system breakage or a mild earthquake that shakes it apart, doing little if any other damage to your home.

If you install a sprinkler system in any building, be sure you earthquake coverage includes damages for "Earthquake Sprinkler Leakage" however for them to cover it you have to have a code-approved and inspected system, not jerry rigged. :boat:

Carsgunsandchics
02-25-2012, 3:53 PM
it is highly recomended you never touch your sprinkler system. i deal with them all the time installing alarms in houses. we had a guy drill through one and my company bought a house. resi sprinklers are running at 600 psi and it will be a very bad day if you goof something up and it breaks when your not home. strange enough those super old school glass grenades is what i keep near my safe. yes they were made in 1910 but when i threw one in a firepit in my backyard the fire was no more. some have a heat activated trigger kinda like a mouse trap that breaks the glass in the case of heat. google glass fire grenade and you can find them.

600 psi dude whoever told you that is on crack! 200psi+ for hydrotesting for new or updated systems. Some places run 125psi with a pump. As for the old fire grenades caution (carbon tetrachloride) is some bad stuff. As for running a sprinkler off of domestic water, it's old tech and works kinda. But there is no notification typically and can just like regular plumbing leak with no idea it's leaking.

Fire sprinklers don't work like in the movies, the whole system doesn't just start spraying when an alarm goes off unless your in a very high risk place like a chem lab or volatile location. And even then it requires a series of events before the water even starts to run.

The cheapest way I've seen protect a safe is to add to the outside. A couple layers of 5/8" sheetrock, or firewrap.

theduece
02-25-2012, 7:54 PM
As others mentioned, Halon will snuff out a fire in a contained room- does nothing for the heat though. I doubt halon is even legal in a residence.... It will kill you faster than a fire and smoke would- I had Halon systems in my computer room in the military.

My "day job" does require me to work with thickwall copper piping once in a while- I'm not worried about installing a single line with perhaps 2 heads on it- (more heads = more water flow- cooling the pipe better, and cooling the safe better. Or would that matter at all, tapping off the water before the regulator for full pressure?

As to Jerry rigging a "temporary- unapproved- un inspected - un permitted... easily to remove setup" is a simple thing for me to accomplish. I would need real fire sprinkler heads for all metal construction- naturally. Which means I could consider leave out the valve, and have the system pressurized all the time. The down side of a constantly pressurized system, is if there is a leak and it floods the house without a fire.... then dealing with insurance and my "jerry rigged" unapproved system....

That is good info on halon. I would not put it in my house. If your concern is flooding the house, would you repair your own water piping? If not then don't do it. If you would it is the same material.

As for the heads just follow the specs on whichever you get and for your intended purpose you should be fine. The heads dont differentiate between metal, wood, or concrete. They are based upon hazard classification. Meaning the distance from head to ceiling, inbetween heads, etc... If your only installing 1 a 1/2" water line copper should flow enough. If your doing 2 or more go 3/4" and up.

NeenachGuy
02-25-2012, 8:10 PM
I do this for a living. On residential there should be NO shut off valve. It should tee off after the meter, prior to house shut off.

Yeah, the valve I was talking about is (i'm not sure what it's called) the type of valve that prevents the fire sprinkler system from becoming depressurized in the event that the water pressure off the water main drops to zero. Apologies for not being more specific in my earlier response.

Carsgunsandchics
02-25-2012, 8:15 PM
Yeah, the valve I was talking about is (i'm not sure what it's called) the type of valve that prevents the fire sprinkler system from becoming depressurized in the event that the water pressure off the water main drops to zero. Apologies for not being more specific in my earlier response.

An inline check valve. Your system would only spurt and then piddle if you loose city water pressure.

But with the newer restrictions with water systems you'll also have to install a double check valve to keep your water from returning to the city side in the event of a city loss of water pressure. At least that's what the requirements are getting to be around here for residential fire sprinkler systems as of the last 5 years, not just regulated to commercial properties anymore.

scotthmt
02-25-2012, 8:55 PM
Run it with cpvc, install would be quick and simple. i install fire sprinklers for a living. And no way would i do a halon system in a house, that is just absurd. I'd figure some way of being notified if the system does go off, or you will have tons of water damage. Most residential systems are to save life, not property, if a sprinkler is going off the water coming out of it is going to mess things up no doubt.

Rob454
02-25-2012, 11:00 PM
it is highly recomended you never touch your sprinkler system. i deal with them all the time installing alarms in houses. we had a guy drill through one and my company bought a house. resi sprinklers are running at 600 psi and it will be a very bad day if you goof something up and it breaks when your not home. strange enough those super old school glass grenades is what i keep near my safe. yes they were made in 1910 but when i threw one in a firepit in my backyard the fire was no more. some have a heat activated trigger kinda like a mouse trap that breaks the glass in the case of heat. google glass fire grenade and you can find them.

No normal sprinkler systems run at 600 psi. Most residentials that are big enough I think over 2500 sq ft or somewhere around there are required to have sprinkler systems these days. I am pretty sure its been a requirement for 12-15 years or so. And most residential have a specific ORANGE colored plastic pipe they do not use steel pipe.
Commercial does not use galvanized pipe ( well maybe some really really old buildings but I have never seen galvanized fire sprinkler piping. They use black pipe I believe schedule 40 but I am not sure on the type but its NOT galvanized. average PSI for a sprinkler system is about 55 PSI and some are up to 80 PSI but that depends on what the city water pressure is. Ive seen it as low as 35-45 but the fire inspectors get pizzed when they see that. In some cases the building has to install a jockey pump and a main pump to bring the PSI up and thats usually because they have to fed water up to higher floors ( highrise) single story buildings are not required to have pumps. 9 at least not normally ) The few times i have seen higher PSI ratings is for highrise buildings but never 600 PSI. some pre-action or Ansul systems have some high PSI at the bottles.

OP
if you do want a sprinkler in the closet then just tap it off your main line to the house after the meter but before the house shut off. This way the pipe always has pressure so if you go on vacation and shut off the house water line the sprinkler will still activate if there is a fire. You can always put a water flow switch somewhere inline and if you have a security system you can have the switch monitored for fire activation

chiselchst
02-26-2012, 12:58 AM
OP
if you do want a sprinkler in the closet then just tap it off your main line to the house after the meter but before the house shut off. This way the pipe always has pressure so if you go on vacation and shut off the house water line the sprinkler will still activate if there is a fire. You can always put a water flow switch somewhere inline and if you have a security system you can have the switch monitored for fire activation

(is there normally a tie in prior to the main shut off?) I guess it would have to be valved. Unless one was going to do a freeze isolation, or a hot tap)

This I can understand, but to not have an isolation valve on the line to the sprinkler I do not. A ball valve could be used on the line to the sprinkler, and have a car seal or wire tie to keep it open. But I sure would want the ability to isolate that section with the sprinkler head...

What temperature (and color sprinkler fuse) are the correct temperature for resi use?

I like the additional drywall idea. That's what I did on the sides, back, top & bottom of the closet my safe is in...3 layers on the botom.

Carsgunsandchics
02-26-2012, 9:05 AM
The shut off would be at the water meter vs just above ground house feed. This way if say you were doing some plumbing repairs and had the water shut off to the house and caught the house on fire with the torch while sweating copper the fire sprinkler system would still work.

As for head temps, usual starting temp is 155degree or 165 depending on brand, and they go up from there. Along with application of upright, pendant or sidewall.

russ69
02-26-2012, 9:42 AM
I have a couple of thoughts for the thinking man. First, the chances of a house fire are extremely unlikely. It's a rare occurrence. You might want to concentrate on other issues such as break-in, concealment and alarm.
The other issue to think about is water in and around your gun safe. Wherever there is water there is a chance for leakage. The risk of a sprinkler over your safe may be bigger than the risk of fire.
Your best bet might be a fire alarm that calls your phone, so you might have a chance to contain the fire. In the case of a total house fire loss, the heat is so intense that anything in your safe will be worthless anyway.

postal
02-26-2012, 9:51 AM
I'm not a "plumber" but I've done minor plumbing work before. When I moved into the house I had to replace the regulator, shut off valve to a new ball valve, then replace the water heater. I can open that stuff up and install a "T" before the regulator for an additional line for sprinkler if I choose to.

This stuff is not in the near future- just had the idea for a while and wanted to hash out if it was even feasible.

Thanks again everyone- very good info.

Good points Russ.

However, my understanding of burglery alarms, is they can only monitor doors and windows with a large dog with dog door- no motion sensors, or ineffectual motion sensors because of a large dog. A little lap dog, motion sensors still work. Of course an alarm would still give the fire monitoring capability.

Water damage to the contents of the safe are very real considerations. If the sprinkler system works and keeps the safe cool, the fire seals would never expand.... allowing even more water inside the safe. I think about when the safe is installed, (in a closet) removing the carpet, making a solid concrete raised platform of about 6" high for the safe to sit on. The safe would be bolted to the concrete platform and the underlying foundation, but it would raise the safe up above the flood of water.

theduece
02-26-2012, 11:44 AM
(is there normally a tie in prior to the main shut off?) I guess it would have to be valved. Unless one was going to do a freeze isolation, or a hot tap)

This I can understand, but to not have an isolation valve on the line to the sprinkler I do not. A ball valve could be used on the line to the sprinkler, and have a car seal or wire tie to keep it open. But I sure would want the ability to isolate that section with the sprinkler head...

What temperature (and color sprinkler fuse) are the correct temperature for resi use?

I like the additional drywall idea. That's what I did on the sides, back, top & bottom of the closet my safe is in...3 layers on the botom.

Myself and anyone else who does sprinks will tell you to not have a valve installed because valves get turned off. They get forgotten off, installing sprinklers without water is worthless. Well that and it is code in most locales that the feed source does not have a shut-off. The most commonly used color(temp) is a red bulb. That is 155* +-.

The shut off would be at the water meter vs just above ground house feed. This way if say you were doing some plumbing repairs and had the water shut off to the house and caught the house on fire with the torch while sweating copper the fire sprinkler system would still work.

As for head temps, usual starting temp is 155degree or 165 depending on brand, and they go up from there. Along with application of upright, pendant or sidewall.

This is good advice IMHO.

Russ you are probably correct. Where I live the area was destroyed by wildfires a few years back. Alot of people knew me and started asking to get estimates for whole house systems. Problem was the fire that had scared them into thinking they needed sprinklers would not have been stopped by them. 70+mph wind driven inferno... When I tried explaining this to them they looked at me as if I was an alien, could not comprehend that I did not want to install sprinklers in thier house. Not because they don't work, only because what they were trying to protect against could not have been stopped by residential sprinklers. Some listened others called different companies.

If you want to buy yourself some time during common house fires sprinklers will work. If you place your safe in a firesafe room(firerated drywall etc), limit the amount of combustible materials stored in there(clothes, carpeting, etc), a sprinkler would greatly improve the chances of the contents of the safe.

Rob454
02-26-2012, 2:06 PM
(is there normally a tie in prior to the main shut off?) I guess it would have to be valved. Unless one was going to do a freeze isolation, or a hot tap)

This I can understand, but to not have an isolation valve on the line to the sprinkler I do not. A ball valve could be used on the line to the sprinkler, and have a car seal or wire tie to keep it open. But I sure would want the ability to isolate that section with the sprinkler head...

What temperature (and color sprinkler fuse) are the correct temperature for resi use?

I like the additional drywall idea. That's what I did on the sides, back, top & bottom of the closet my safe is in...3 layers on the botom.

Most residentials have two shut off valves. One at the street after the meter and one at the incoming line prior to entering the dwelling. You would T tap right between the main shut off and the house shut off. This way if you go on vacation and shut off the water to the house you still have city water pressure going in to the line for the safe/sprinkler. If youhave a security system you can add a tamper valve inline also for shutoff and have the tamper and water flow switch monitored for trouble or fire.

There are many different sprinkler heads with different release mechanisms. I believe you would most likely need the orange or red ( 135* 155*) which is more than sufficient for your residential needs. Remember depending on where you place the head ( wall or ceiling ) you need to use different heads due to spray pattern differences from wall to ceiling mount.
I have a couple of thoughts for the thinking man. First, the chances of a house fire are extremely unlikely. It's a rare occurrence. .

No its not a rare occurence. houses catch fire all the time. Last week ( no joke) 5 am there was a condo fire close to my house basically a few streets down. Houses catch fire all the time.





However, my understanding of burglery alarms, is they can only monitor doors and windows with a large dog with dog door- no motion sensors, or ineffectual motion sensors because of a large dog. A little lap dog, motion sensors still work. Of course an alarm would still give the fire monitoring capability.



Well you would be wrong. Burg systems can be used to monitor a lot of different things and do a lot of different things besides doors and windows. The old door and window 4-6 zone panels are still used for your basic "free" install offers by alarm companies but they make smart systems now that can have 200 different monitoring points that can be used to do a LOT of different things. Look up Radionics 9112 systems well now Bosch 9112 systems. You will be surprised what those can do. if you want see some crazy cool stuff go look up DSC systems or heck some Honeywell stuff is pretty good these days also. Burg systems have come along way its all a matter of how much money you have to spend. I have done some pretty amazing security systems but those were all ground up installs where I had the budget to go hog wild. In most cases people simply do the basics. #Even a basic alarm panel can be programmed to work with a waterflow and tamper switch. And no there is no magic most of it is in the programming