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gotshotgun?
02-23-2012, 7:56 AM
With all of the commotion starting to get kicked up again about Obama's possible reelection, it seems the firearms industries are going to be taking full advantage for round 2 with price hikes and the squeezing of supply.

What do you think the top 5 firearms would be, any type or price, to purchase for investment reasons. Thinking beyond the next 4 years, but maybe looking at a turnover within 10 years time.

What would you buy for this purpose? What are the rare guns, or the guns you know will become more popular and hard to get in the future?

Example from the past that come to my mind are OD Glocks; now going for $100 more than their black counterpart that cost the same when first sold.

a1c
02-23-2012, 8:23 AM
There is already a ton of firearms that were bought before the first Obama scare that people have been trying to unload - notice the huge number of ARs in the Marketplace that people are trying to sell above market value.

M1s and M1 carbines are always good investments since they're drying up, but I wouldn't be hoping for a huge return. For the other milsurps, it's hard to say. Soviet SKSs, Finnish Mosins, Dragunovs... You can't go wrong with those, but then again, you don't know what the next craze will be. Factor in the rising cost of ammo for some calibers as surplus dry up (remember how just a couple of years ago Tokarevs were so hot, because ammo was dirt cheap? no longer the case), and the equation gets a bit complicated. There might not be as much cheap 7.52x54R to go around 10 years from now.

I'd stick to proven values like M1s or M1903s, which have the advantage of firing cartridges that will be around for a long time, and that have a strong following in this country. M1 carbines have slightly harder to find ammo, but they are a huge symbol.

Anyway, that's my 2 cents.

shafferds
02-23-2012, 8:40 AM
Just buy a bunch of stripped lowers cheap.

SGGear
02-23-2012, 8:47 AM
I think colt firearms is a great starting point. Blued pythons are always high in demand. I would even look into a mint condition colt 70 series 1911. If your into modern firearms, I would look into painted guns thats hard to find in CA.

gotshotgun?
02-23-2012, 9:25 AM
Goods points.

Especially on the scarcity of ammo in the future affecting gun demand.

gotshotgun?
02-23-2012, 9:27 AM
Obviously Colt pythons and to some extent, 70's 1911s are solid investments. However these are like the blue chip companies of firearms investments. Stable, secure but expensive. (Think Apple, Google ect.)

What are some firearms that are not yet seen as collectable or at least not noticed by the majority of gun owners as such?

me109g4
02-23-2012, 9:27 AM
German/french made Walthers, particularly the PPK are shooting up in value, less so the interarms PPK nd PPK/S.
The recently made "Walthers" made under S&W license are trending downward value wise as its hit or miss whether they work or not right out of the box.
garands and carbines are also a good investment.

locktime
02-23-2012, 9:35 AM
Any all matching original configuration WWII firearms. Luger, K98, Garand, M1 Carbine, Arisaka.

98 % modern Colt Revolvers

All original 95 % or better Winchester pre-64 lever or Model 70 rifles


None of these are cheap to buy today, but they will always hold their value and likely continue to appreciate at a significant rate.

S470FM
02-23-2012, 10:14 AM
I'd recommend a Parker Bros shotgun made before 1935--i'm working overtime on trying to get one (long story).

stix213
02-23-2012, 1:04 PM
Any popular gun that ends production will jump in value over the long term. (Python for example)

Any popular gun with already limited supply or direct competition, that is seen as a target for another gun ban could go up in value over the short term, but will later drop after the insanity subsides. (Saiga 12?) This could happen with any mention of a gun ban out of the administration, even unrelated to an election.

Old WWII and similar guns that run into short supply could go up in value. (M1, M1 Carbine, guns from various other countries, but I seriously doubt the M91/30)

MBW
02-23-2012, 1:37 PM
Not sure about five but I think a Russian sks would be a good buy for a couple of reasons. They are easy to get because of their c&r status and I think because its a military c&r it will go up in value because everything else sort of becomes full auto after the sks in the military rifle world so I think in the future a "military c&r rifle" will be more rare than they are today. Also im pretty sure they are no longer made. At least the Russian version isnt unlike the m1. And I believe the Russian version is the most sought after. Im not a collector or a expert in any way, shape, or form but I think these things might matter in the future when it comes to value.

Rob454
02-23-2012, 1:39 PM
Anything that has Colt followed by a name of some slithering reptile.
Russian SKS rifles although they have dropped in price. i used to see them for 550-600 now i see them at $400-450. They may go back up simply for the fact they are C&R.

Yugo SKS have kept their value better then the russians so far and have gone up in price. I think a lot of people are realizing that some Yugos are actually more rare than the russians. M59 is a lot harder to find than a russian for example. Thats one rifle that i think it will go up in price more as people butcher them into bubbas because its a "cheap" Yugo when in fact there are a lot less M59s than there are Russians. i had one but i got tired of wiping the dust off of it so i sold it for way more than i ever paid for it.

Saiga 12s will stay high in value
Anything Glock
Anything Sig
Any pump action shotgun . For example Mossberg 500 at big 5 were $279 but the sale price now is $319 so you can see they bumped the price up. Still a deal compared to the local gun store but not by much.

AR15 and AK platforms but those are a given. You can add in any so called black rifles in this category. While prices may not go "up" I bet they stay even with no drop.

lots of these guns may not go up in value but if you bought it at reasonable price you will probably get most if not all your money back and in some cases possibly profit. Pretty much any gun out there can be valuable. No gun really loses a lot of its value that much. in most cases the value really does not drop much especially if its a popular in demand model. if its some obscure brand with some obscure caliber than yeah that may take a person who WANTS it to buy it. if you stick to mainstream guns those would be a investment simply because at any time you can get your money back pretty quickly

None of these guns (with a few collectables as a exception will bring you a ton of profit unless you just got them for a steal) but they will keep their value over a long time. most "used" guns are not really used much at all. For example I have a hunting rifle that probably gets maybe a box of ammo through it in a year. some is to sight it in and the rest is if I hit a deer or a boar. And the rifle is 18 years old. But I am willing to bet that when Obama comes up for reelection that prices for guns is gonna sky rocket. All these overpriced guns will seem like bargains. Now the only thing we can hope is everyone buys into it and then someone else gets elected. Can you say overstock sale?

And even as a investment you are not looking at making a ton of cash from a sale. I mean you can make a profit but say you bought a AK for $650 you may be able to swing $700-$750 maybe give or take another $50 but you won't be doubling your money or anything. I buy guns cause I enjoy them. if I sell a gun its not because of the money i made off of it. its because I usually get bored with it and starts to collect dust.

Ripon83
02-23-2012, 1:49 PM
Not sure I see guns as an investment. I mean I was into firearms back in the early 1990's and remember buying a Colt AR that "in between" California's point system \ ban at the time for $999. Look at them now - 20 years later - $1199 I saw one advertised in Sacramento new at the gun shop today. 20 years - $200 - not much of an investment.

Colt's are already high priced. Try and touch a really nice blue Python for $1500 now? It seems almost impossible. There was a nice Series 70 1911 Gold Cup on the forum last week at $1500 as well. I don't know that in 10 years you will see these at $3,000 or not, but if you do my guess is the dollar changed - not the gun.

As a thought - why not get yourself on the ATF radar and buy a 5 pack of stripped lowers....I mean you are talking about $350/400 plus hefty fees but if they seriously get ugly with AR's you have 5 of them and not a lot of money invested. Unless they start treating uppers like the whole thing you have what it takes to assemble 5 assault rifles.

The War Wagon
02-23-2012, 1:56 PM
Firearms that will HOLD their value, whether America swirls the crapper or not.

- Colt 6920 AR. The AR gold standard. It will NOT lose value, and may in fact, GAIN value - even used.
- Springfield 1911. BEST value in a 1911, with even more up-side in a complete swirl.
- Ruger Mk.II. THE standard in .22LR pistols. Used ones bring a premium, and a swirl will not change that.
- Ruger 10/22. The most popular semi-auto .22LR rifle; will bring a premium, as will the magazines, when it comes to having to eat rats, squirrels, armadillos, pigeons, rabbits, and other urban fauna.
- Remington 870 12 gauge. Sturdier than the Mossberg 500 - more plentiful than their stronger 590 model. It will hold it's premium well - especially in urban areas, as well as pheasant/goose/duck country.

Interestingly enough, I only own #2 on this list http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/images/icons/icon11.gif. I have the other bases covered, but if I had to start from SCRATCH, this is how I'd do it, and what I'd recommend to others.

winnre
02-23-2012, 1:58 PM
If you have an extra $500 buy 5 stripped lowers. Do not worry about building on them now, you can do that in the future. Got another $800? Buy eight more stripped lowers.

SDM44
02-23-2012, 2:02 PM
A gun is only as valuable as the person beholds it to be.

Now stocking up on ammo for 'investment purposes' on the other hand.......

oldsmoboat
02-23-2012, 2:19 PM
There is already a ton of firearms that were bought before the first Obama scare that people have been trying to unload - notice the huge number of ARs in the Marketplace that people are trying to sell above market value....
I guess most people think of guns as investments because they price them accordingly.
EDIT
LOL, first gun I looked at in the Market Place is priced as an investment and a member even commented on the price.

q3131a
02-23-2012, 2:51 PM
Colts' are always on top of an investment list but the problem is they're already priced high to begin with.

Python, Diamondback, Series '70 will all gain in value.Add maybe pre-lock Smiths and copies of FAL, HK91/93 and various "military-style" copies.

Ripon83
02-23-2012, 4:40 PM
Well - I agree that these will hold their value - but can not see them increasing in value.

FWIW I have 4 of 5 on the list and have had them for some time; as I mentioned I bought a Colt AR in 1994, its 18 years old (I thought 20) and it was $899 new not $999 as I had thought. So in 18 years the retail on these has changed $400? That's not a good ROI and mine has some miles on it so I won't get retail.

I paid $199 for MKII with a bull barrel in the late 1980's or maybe 1990 and really can't see how the new one's at $267 suggests its a good investment
http://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/product_info.php/cPath/21_49_74/products_id/13153/Ruger+2245+Mark+III+22LR+5.5%22+Blued+ADJUSTABLE+S IGHTS

10/22....my first one was $169 or 179 at Big 5 and that was in the 1980's and the last one I just got for $225 (used) with plenty of magazines and accessories.

Remington 870 - well that thing has killed so many Doves I doubt its worth that much today - its got use on it - I should try to figure out how to make it a HD shotgun but as I understand it the retail on them today isn't all that much less than it was 20 years ago either.

So yeah they can hold their value - but holding isn't an investment.

Only gun I have that I think that has seriously increased in value is the Dan Wesson 22 revolver.


Firearms that will HOLD their value, whether America swirls the crapper or not.

- Colt 6920 AR. The AR gold standard. It will NOT lose value, and may in fact, GAIN value - even used.
- Springfield 1911. BEST value in a 1911, with even more up-side in a complete swirl.
- Ruger Mk.II. THE standard in .22LR pistols. Used ones bring a premium, and a swirl will not change that.
- Ruger 10/22. The most popular semi-auto .22LR rifle; will bring a premium, as will the magazines, when it comes to having to eat rats, squirrels, armadillos, pigeons, rabbits, and other urban fauna.
- Remington 870 12 gauge. Sturdier than the Mossberg 500 - more plentiful than their stronger 590 model. It will hold it's premium well - especially in urban areas, as well as pheasant/goose/duck country.

Interestingly enough, I only own #2 on this list http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/images/icons/icon11.gif. I have the other bases covered, but if I had to start from SCRATCH, this is how I'd do it, and what I'd recommend to others.

Rob454
02-23-2012, 7:29 PM
- Remington 870 12 gauge. Sturdier than the Mossberg 500 - more plentiful than their stronger 590 model.

.

So let me ask this.

How do you figure? I have a 18 year old Mossberg 500 and it had PLENTY of shots going through it. The ONLY thing I changed on it was the spring and that was because it stayed constantly loaded. So how exactly IS a remington sturdier?

Rhythm of Life
02-23-2012, 7:40 PM
So let me ask this.

How do you figure? I have a 18 year old Mossberg 500 and it had PLENTY of shots going through it. The ONLY thing I changed on it was the spring and that was because it stayed constantly loaded. So how exactly IS a remington sturdier?

Only thing I can say is at the C%R Gunshow in Santa Barbara a few weeks back I never saw a mossberg, plenty of old Remingtons still around.


But mainly I agree with you, they are both built well and I own 3 Rem shotguns.

helpme
02-23-2012, 7:43 PM
Hi-Points. Lots of Hi-Points.

Thefeeder
02-23-2012, 7:52 PM
Not sure I see guns as an investment. I mean I was into firearms back in the early 1990's and remember buying a Colt AR that "in between" California's point system \ ban at the time for $999. Look at them now - 20 years later - $1199 I saw one advertised in Sacramento new at the gun shop today. 20 years - $200 - not much of an investment.

Colt's are already high priced. Try and touch a really nice blue Python for $1500 now? It seems almost impossible. There was a nice Series 70 1911 Gold Cup on the forum last week at $1500 as well. I don't know that in 10 years you will see these at $3,000 or not, but if you do my guess is the dollar changed - not the gun.As a thought - why not get yourself on the ATF radar and buy a 5 pack of stripped lowers....I mean you are talking about $350/400 plus hefty fees but if they seriously get ugly with AR's you have 5 of them and not a lot of money invested. Unless they start treating uppers like the whole thing you have what it takes to assemble 5 assault rifles.


I tought the same thing when Pythons and Colt Aces were 800.00 since I bought my first snake for about 420.00.......a got wiser !

The War Wagon
02-23-2012, 7:53 PM
So let me ask this.

How do you figure? I have a 18 year old Mossberg 500 and it had PLENTY of shots going through it. The ONLY thing I changed on it was the spring and that was because it stayed constantly loaded. So how exactly IS a remington sturdier?

I own a Mossberg 500 as well (also an M1 Super 90!).

http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc305/The_War_Wagon/100_7593.jpg

I just happen to think the 870 is a better built and sturdier shotgun. That's NOT to say the 500 is garbage - it's that, as I understand the components of the 870, I believe it to be a higher quality firearm.

anyracoon
02-23-2012, 8:00 PM
Any WW2 Beltfeds, 1919a4s, 1919a6s & FN30s!

drdarrin@sbcglobal.net
02-23-2012, 8:51 PM
I've never looked at firearms as investments; I look at them as tools and insurance. As with any tool, buy the best/as many as you can afford, care for them and hang on to them. Keep your eyes open for good deals, not specific types or brands. And stock pile ammo for them. That seems to increase in price much faster than the weapons that use it.
If you want to invest in something, think real estate, quality stocks, bonds or precious metals. The return is much, much higher.

Rob454
02-24-2012, 4:05 AM
Only thing I can say is at the C%R Gunshow in Santa Barbara a few weeks back I never saw a mossberg, plenty of old Remingtons still around.


But mainly I agree with you, they are both built well and I own 3 Rem shotguns.

Ok I see.

gunafficionado
02-24-2012, 5:19 AM
I think that most firearms will not rocket in value unless they're production is discontinued or they're made unavailable in the market.

Most "sport-utility" rifles are a good bet for future price appreciation as is the firearms that have been customized by established gunsmiths, 1911s especially.

I think the items that stand to gain the most in value are magazine re-build kits. These items were selling for more than 5 times their value at their peak. Sell parts individually and one can get more for the price of one.

The steel receiver of the 870 and longevity in the market makes it a better shotgun in the eyes of many. That being said, I own 3 Mossbergs myself, in various configurations, and couldn't be happier.

drkphibr
02-24-2012, 7:08 AM
I don't look at firearms as a financial investment tool like I would stocks, but I do consider them to be investments for other reasons.

For example, I can enjoy a handgun. Shoot it, clean it, care for it, upgrade it, etc. If it's not a commodity gun (e.g., Glock - not bashing Glocks, just pointing out the obvious) it may actually increase in value to some degree depending on it's condition and such. Guns don't normally decrease in value (especially ones out of production), so the potential for increased value is there.

With stocks, I can do nothing with them but watch them go up/down in price daily and constantly worry about upside/downside. Same can be said for real estate and depending on when you purchased it, it might be a win or a big lose. In general though, you probably won't receive significant financial gain from buying/selling firearms. A great firearm is like a classic car. It's something you can take pride in owning, can use and enjoy and quite possibly sell it for at least what you paid and possibly more. Can't say that about too many other things.

TMC
02-24-2012, 7:20 AM
Perazzi shotguns

Holland & Holland guns

There's are some used H&H shotguns on the website at the bargin price of $22,000 but most are in the $80,000 to $150,000 range. A new bolt rifle starts around $42,000 or a nice doouble rifle for $150,000.

Tanner68
02-24-2012, 7:35 AM
While guns might not be in the same investment class as stocks, real estate, and fine art, it is still nice to watch your guns appreciate. If you had bought K31s several years ago, when they were priced like mosin nagants, you could smile smugly to yourself. Since I like guns, I don't mind thinking about what could appreciate.

Another nice thing, compared to to other traditional investments, is that many guns hold their value more reliably than other investments. I don't see my military C&R rifles or old Colt autos going down in value as long as their condition doesn't deteriorate.

DTOM CA!
02-24-2012, 7:35 AM
Everything I buy I shoot. If you are really buying for an investment it should be as close to new as possible with little wear. The Walther P7 looks like a good investment. Desert Eagles can be sold in seconds on CG.

Tanner68
02-24-2012, 7:50 AM
Everything I buy I shoot. If you are really buying for an investment it should be as close to new as possible with little wear. The Walther P7 looks like a good investment. Desert Eagles can be sold in seconds on CG.

One pays dearly for nearly new finish in collector guns. 90%, 95%, 98%, Mint, can have wild valuations. There is a saying, there are four precious metals; gold, silver, platinum, and Colt bluing.

And paying fairly or finding a bargain for a gun in 50-85% condition is easier, and you can still shoot it and not freak out about putting wear on the finish or grips or dinging it in the safe.

smle-man
02-24-2012, 7:58 AM
Pre 60's Colt double action revolvers in 95 percent or better condition. Still relatively inexpensive and a lot of them out there but prices are starting to stir and will start climbing. I'm already seeing prices going up on the officer model match revolvers that were cheap for a long time. You heard it here first!

chuckdc
02-24-2012, 8:08 AM
Colt revolvers (though I personally think SAA's are overpriced, the market doesnt agree with me. Pythons are higher in CA than they are everywhere else, but the other Colt revolvers still have a lot of headroom in their prices)

S&W revolvers without the lock on them

good-quality sxs double shotguns (a sleeper are the SKB/Ithaca ones.. good quality, and the prices are beginning to go up, Browning BSS are in a similar spot, though they have climbed a lot the last few years) I wouldn't put any of the Turkish guns in this category except the S&W Elite Gold and the Kimber one.. and those are starting to climb now that the last examples are leaving the market. Part of this has been driven by SASS, the rest is that there just aren't that many places making SxS's for a reasonable (not multi-thousand dollar) price anymore. the LC Smiths, Lefevers and so on are now heading to the hands of collectors, so the "field" ones are going to go the way of the Parker.

Bolt-action military rifles. I know it's been said before, but we're coming to the end of the stored-up ones.

Semi-auto military rifles will remain cheap for a bit, but even those are going to run out at some point. They weren't mainstays for a long period like the bolt guns were, so there aren't going to be as many. I seriously doubt we'll ever see the full-auto stuff get kicked loose as surplus (maybe as parts kits, but that's about it).

Dead*Reckoned
02-24-2012, 10:07 AM
Full auto..

Tanner68
02-24-2012, 11:10 AM
Colt revolvers (though I personally think SAA's are overpriced, the market doesnt agree with me. Pythons are higher in CA than they are everywhere else, but the other Colt revolvers still have a lot of headroom in their prices)

S&W revolvers without the lock on them

good-quality sxs double shotguns (a sleeper are the SKB/Ithaca ones.. good quality, and the prices are beginning to go up, Browning BSS are in a similar spot, though they have climbed a lot the last few years) I wouldn't put any of the Turkish guns in this category except the S&W Elite Gold and the Kimber one.. and those are starting to climb now that the last examples are leaving the market. Part of this has been driven by SASS, the rest is that there just aren't that many places making SxS's for a reasonable (not multi-thousand dollar) price anymore. the LC Smiths, Lefevers and so on are now heading to the hands of collectors, so the "field" ones are going to go the way of the Parker.

Bolt-action military rifles. I know it's been said before, but we're coming to the end of the stored-up ones.

Semi-auto military rifles will remain cheap for a bit, but even those are going to run out at some point. They weren't mainstays for a long period like the bolt guns were, so there aren't going to be as many. I seriously doubt we'll ever see the full-auto stuff get kicked loose as surplus (maybe as parts kits, but that's about it).

I second all of this.

dan12580
02-25-2012, 3:23 AM
Here in america this list looks like this-
1-anything full auto
2-anything full auto
3-anything full auto
4-anything full auto
5-anything full auto

gotshotgun?
02-25-2012, 6:55 AM
Very thoughtful list...lol

Tanner68
02-25-2012, 7:42 AM
So, to build the OPs list, a combination of consensus and my bias, maybe we have the following.
1- Colt handguns, named after reptiles, dick specials, 1903s, 1908s, etc. 1911 if not overpriced.
2- Colt 6920 or any stripped lower (the motivation for this one is kinda out of sync with the others of the list, but it is a good gamble)
3- C&R military rifles
4- American SxS shotguns
5- S&W handguns, pre-lock, and older models
and...
6- Classic American sporting rifles, Pre64 Winchesters, Savage99s, important Winchester and Marlin and other lever actions, etc., always have a following

What do you guys say? I know someone isn't going to get rich buying up inventories of the above. But they will hold their value.