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View Full Version : Hand pick for $10 more worth it?


Trevolution
02-15-2012, 12:34 PM
If I were looking to buy a rifle, while not being specific because many rifles have this option, would it be worth it to have them hand-select a better grade? Or is the $10 not worth the extra look over?

paul0660
02-15-2012, 12:35 PM
Hand pick generally means the best of the next 5 or 10 out of the box. I do not know if it is worth it.

a1c
02-15-2012, 12:38 PM
^ This.

No easy answer to your question. If the batch of 5 your gun is selected from is a good batch, then it might not be worth it. If it's a lousy batch, then it makes all the difference. Except if all 5 guns are equally crappy.

Honestly, it all comes down to two things:

1. Whether or not you can afford the extra $10

2. If you're the kind of guy who will beat himself over not paying a few more bucks once he gets his gun and is not completely satisfied by his purchase.

Trevolution
02-15-2012, 12:38 PM
When looked at from the standpoint of 5 or 10, with the chance none of those are spectacular, it is definitely more of a risk. If they went through a whole crate and chose the best one, that would be a bit better.

Trevolution
02-15-2012, 12:40 PM
...If you're the kind of guy who will beat himself over not paying a few more bucks once he gets his gun and is not completely satisfied by his purchase.

In that respect, it's only $10 more, which in the long run isn't really much and you really would never know either way if you could've gotten something better or worse, so there really shouldn't be any remorse.

paul0660
02-15-2012, 12:45 PM
When looked at from the standpoint of 5 or 10, with the chance none of those are spectacular, it is definitely more of a risk. If they went through a whole crate and chose the best one, that would be a bit better.

If they went through the whole crate, it would be fantastic.

Maybe look for a site that guarantees satisfaction, be dissatisfied, be a butt, send it back, and figure they will avoid that drama by finding a good one. That might cost $30.

sd_shooter
02-15-2012, 1:09 PM
Seems like there can be two outcomes if you decide to pay:
1. You get a nice gun. Then you'll pat yourself on the back.
2. You get a scuffed up gun. Then you'll feel ripped off.

I wouldn't pay. My most recent order (non-handpick) was a basic round receiver Mosin and it was beautiful! Much nicer than the laminate I "hand picked" myself from Big5.

winnre
02-15-2012, 1:15 PM
I got a P1 at Turner's, opted for the used version, it looked cleaner than the new one. Then again my Big 5 Mosin Nagant looks like cavemen used it.

rojocorsa
02-15-2012, 1:16 PM
I know this is a kinda vague answer, but from what I've seen on all the forums is that it really depends on the time and place (who you order from). It's more like a matter of luck.

Hell, some people get lucky without the handpick as well.



Winnre, I got luck in that I scored a kick-*** Mosin at Big 5 once, and right before they had the recent shortage too. I don't even care that it's force-matched.

emcon5
02-15-2012, 1:33 PM
When you order, ask. "Is the hand pick worth it?"

They may be honest with you. I have had both answers.

Trevolution
02-15-2012, 1:42 PM
I was checking out aim surplus, and I've heard good things about them, plus their prices seemed good. Would I want to invest in the hand selection from them?

SVT-40
02-15-2012, 4:30 PM
The biggest thing to consider regarding hand pics is the actual quality of the pool they will pick from.

Consider the Chinese type -53 which have been recently sold by some vendors. ALL these guns came from Century arms who described them a "very good". Here is the description of what "very good" means.

So paying more for a rifle which will have less than 30% of it's original finish at best, and the condition of it's bore not even considered is not worth it.

Now the Mosin Nagant rifle which are currently available do have a range of conditions which will vary. So paying for a hand picked specimen may get you a better condition rifle.




FACTORY NEW- all original parts; 100% original finish; in perfect condition in every respect, inside and out.

EXCELLENT- all original parts; over 80% original finish; sharp lettering, numerals and design on metal and wood; unmarred wood; fine bore.

FINE- all original parts; over 30% original finish; sharp lettering, numerals and design on metal and wood; minor marks in wood, good bore.

VERY GOOD- all original parts; none to 30% original finish; original metal surfaces smooth with all edges sharp; clear lettering, numerals and design on metal; wood slightly scratched or bruised; bore disregarded for collectors firearms.

GOOD- some minor replacement parts; metal smoothly rusted or lightly pitted in places, cleaned or reblued; principal lettering, numerals and design on metal legible; wood refinished, scratched, bruised or minor cracks repaired; in good working order.

FAIR- some major parts replaced; minor replacement parts may be required; metal rusted, may be lightly pitted all over, vigorously cleaned or reblued; rounded edges of metal and wood; principal lettering, numerals and design on metal partly obliterated; wood scratched, bruised, cracked or repaired where broken; in fair working order or can be easily repaired and placed in working order.

POOR- major and minor parts replaced; major replacement parts required and extensive restoration needed; metal deeply pitted; principal lettering, numerals and design obliterated; wood badly scratched, bruised, cracked or broken; mechanically inoperative; generally undesirable as a collectors firearm.

C&Rtrader
02-15-2012, 4:47 PM
When you order, ask. "Is the hand pick worth it?"

They may be honest with you. I have had both answers.

This

in my experience.. if the guns are listed as excellent condition its generally not worth it. But if the guns are listed as anything less than that it generally is. Then again do not overlook the laziness of unsupervised employees :)

m1a1driver
02-15-2012, 7:23 PM
ya gotta read what handpicking they'll be doing, I know some places handpick only for bore condition

Trevolution
02-15-2012, 7:27 PM
FACTORY NEW- all original parts; 100% original finish; in perfect condition in every respect, inside and out.

EXCELLENT- all original parts; over 80% original finish; sharp lettering, numerals and design on metal and wood; unmarred wood; fine bore.

FINE- all original parts; over 30% original finish; sharp lettering, numerals and design on metal and wood; minor marks in wood, good bore.

VERY GOOD- all original parts; none to 30% original finish; original metal surfaces smooth with all edges sharp; clear lettering, numerals and design on metal; wood slightly scratched or bruised; bore disregarded for collectors firearms.

GOOD- some minor replacement parts; metal smoothly rusted or lightly pitted in places, cleaned or reblued; principal lettering, numerals and design on metal legible; wood refinished, scratched, bruised or minor cracks repaired; in good working order.

FAIR- some major parts replaced; minor replacement parts may be required; metal rusted, may be lightly pitted all over, vigorously cleaned or reblued; rounded edges of metal and wood; principal lettering, numerals and design on metal partly obliterated; wood scratched, bruised, cracked or repaired where broken; in fair working order or can be easily repaired and placed in working order.

POOR- major and minor parts replaced; major replacement parts required and extensive restoration needed; metal deeply pitted; principal lettering, numerals and design obliterated; wood badly scratched, bruised, cracked or broken; mechanically inoperative; generally undesirable as a collectors firearm.

Wow.....that's definitely not what I think of when I hear the term "very good." One could use that list in selling a car:

"The vehicle is in very good condition, with approximately 0-30% of the paint remaining, the emblems and VIN numbers are still visible, the body may have dents and dings (but who notices with a paint job like that), the engine, all of it's workings, and the interior are completely disregarded because hey....this is a collectable....oh, you actually wanted to drive the vehicle, my bad."

SVT-40
02-15-2012, 11:24 PM
Thats why it's good to know the "rating" when buying C&R firearms. VG usually = POOP

Clipity
02-16-2012, 4:10 PM
When I purchased my two Styers, I chose to have them hand picked. They are nice looking on the outside and all matching part numbers but one is counterbored. Now when I purchased my two 91/30s from the same place, I chose not to hand pick and received two very nice rifles. A 38 Tula and a 43 Izhevsk, so I would say as others have said luck of the draw my friend.

DennisCA
02-17-2012, 9:03 AM
Basically it's a crap-shoot, roll-of-the-dice (name your adjective).

I've only had one experience and that was with Classic Arms, I purchased a laminate 91-30 and yes I did pay the extra $10.00 for a hand-pick.

It was a izzy, nothing special but it was very nice weapon (good condition: inside and out). Maybe I was just lucky. My preference is to buy guns and ammo off my fellow calgunners, you can see the gun prior to purchase.

:clap:

.22guy
02-17-2012, 9:13 AM
Just pay it, it's 10 bucks. You spend more than that at McDonalds. :)

DennisCA
02-17-2012, 9:21 AM
Just pay it, it's 10 bucks. You spend more than that at McDonalds. :)

:iagree: And it won't make you fat!

TheExpertish
02-17-2012, 9:25 AM
I say no cause I'm a gamblin' man. Well not really, but I'd rather pocket the money for ammo. For the extra $10 you're not going to know what you actually missed out on.

Trevolution
02-17-2012, 9:41 AM
It's only $10, and let's say I get a great quality firearm, I would never really ponder what I would have gotten if I didn't spend the extra $10. If I choose to opt out and end up with a sub-par firearm, I will probably wonder what I would have gotten had I just spent the extra money. Then again, like most of the posters are saying, it depends on the batch as well. At that point, it won't really seem to matter if you spend the extra money or not, if it's from a bad batch.