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View Full Version : What grain bullet can the garand handle. .


majones24
02-13-2012, 8:18 PM
I have a 1940 receiver. Is the 150 grain bullet the best for the price. Is there any issues with shooting magnetic surplus ammo.

kendog4570
02-13-2012, 8:30 PM
You're good. Keep it to 175's and below, at 2700 foot seconds and below, and you are OK. Heavier bullets, driven at velocities that make them really work good, will batter the receiver over the long haul.

Noonanda
02-13-2012, 8:55 PM
use powders no slower than IMR4064, IMR or Hodgdon 4895 is perfect for the garand. Surplus magnetic is fine, I shoot AP out of mine

marathonman
02-13-2012, 9:02 PM
I use 175 and 168 and imr 4064

rojocorsa
02-13-2012, 9:14 PM
It's not the grains, it's the powders.

4064 and 4895 are good to go. In fact, IMR 4895 was used in some of the original USGI ammo, according to one of my books.

Beetle Bailey
02-13-2012, 9:24 PM
Surplus M2 ball ammo is great for the Garand. Also, Federal makes new production .30-06 specificially for the Garand. I think it's a red box with a little label that says M1 Garand. Haven't tried it myself however. I've handloaded 150 grain and 175 grain bullets with IMR 4895 and it's been fine.

G-forceJunkie
02-13-2012, 9:30 PM
A couple of resources on reloading for the Garand:
http://masterpostemple.bravepages.com/M1load.htm
http://www.thehighroad.org/archive/index.php/t-296718.html

kendog4570
02-13-2012, 9:34 PM
It's not the grains, it's the powders..


Not sure what you are referring to. However, if you drive a 180, 200, or 220 grain bullet at working velocities, you WILL tear the crap out of the receiver and eventually develop cracks in the hood area. No matter the powder type that gets it there. Same with the M14.

To the OP, stick with GI ball ammo or the equivalent and you will be fine.

majones24
02-13-2012, 9:46 PM
What is the cheapest place for surplus ammo.

rojocorsa
02-13-2012, 9:53 PM
Not sure what you are referring to. However, if you drive a 180, 200, or 220 grain bullet at working velocities, you WILL tear the crap out of the receiver and eventually develop cracks in the hood area. No matter the powder type that gets it there. Same with the M14.

To the OP, stick with GI ball ammo or the equivalent and you will be fine.

You're right.


What I was trying to get at is that usually people think that you can't go above 150, but then again, it's no good to have the wrong powder. Know what I mean?



Maybe the OP should look into adjustable gas plugs?

kendog4570
02-13-2012, 10:06 PM
You're right.


What I was trying to get at is that usually people think that you can't go above 150, but then again, it's no good to have the wrong powder. Know what I mean?



Maybe the OP should look into adjustable gas plugs?

Sure. Stay below 180's and 2700 fps and its all good. I think 150 grn ball may even go out a little faster, but the gun is designed for it so have at it. Stay clear of slow powders also. 4831 an 4350 are wonderful in 30-06 in a bolt gun, but tend to bend things up in a Garand.

sacto929
02-13-2012, 10:36 PM
What is the cheapest place for surplus ammo.

CMP

Rock6.3
02-13-2012, 10:50 PM
"Reloading for the M1 Rifle" by John R. Clarke was published in the American Rifleman magazine, March 1986. It contains load data for 150, 168, 180, 190, and 200 grain bullets.

"To attain useable port pressures in a .30-'06 M1 requires use of a powder with a relative quickness between IMR 3031 (the quickest) and IMR 4320 (the slowest). Powders that are "faster than IMR 3031 will not develop useful velocities within safe pressure levels. Powders "slower" than IMR 4320 can develop useful velocities but generally develop excessive port pressures. Excessive port pressure in an M1 need not be a dangerous condition (though it can be). Excessive port pressure will damage the rifle, sooner or later, by causing the operating rod to bend. It may also cause failures to feed, wherin the bolt cycles before the magazine follower can lift a fresh cartridge into the bolt's path. The bolt then closes on an empty chamber. As part of the test program from which this article was developed, a load using IMR 4831 and 180 grain bullets was tried that caused this malfunction to occur on a regular basis. It prompts us to make a hard and fast rule: when loading emmunition for use in an M1 rifle, select a propellant with a relative quickness that is equal to or faster than that of IMR 4320. There's a corollary: if an M1 fails to function with the ammunition loaded according to the data presented here, one or more components of the gas system may be worn. Check for the maximum or minimum acceptable dimensions listed below and replace parts as needed: Barrel, at gas port- .5995" max. Gas piston - .525" min. o.d. Gas Cylinder - .532 Max. inside diam. (i.d.) Gas Port - .0805" max. i.d. (should just accept a No. 46 twist drill). "

5 Pages total, and very worth reading.

m1a1driver
02-13-2012, 11:43 PM
definitely get an adjustable gas plug, look at the ammo closely, a lot of the walmart .30-06 ammo is loaded hotter than a garand should handle, your oprod may bend.

majones24
02-14-2012, 10:44 AM
I found some 150 grain soft point federal ammo at Walmart for 16$ a box. Will this ammo be ok to shoot.

Rock6.3
02-14-2012, 10:58 AM
I found some 150 grain soft point federal ammo at Walmart for 16$ a box. Will this ammo be ok to shoot.

Safe to shoot in a 30.06 rifle, yes.
Safe for the oprod in an M1 Garand, no. The powder burn rate is not correct for the M1, you would need at minimum an adjustable gas plug that is properly adjusted.

majones24
02-14-2012, 11:26 AM
Well that is money wasted. I was thinking that it would be ok.

17+1
02-14-2012, 12:01 PM
You're right.


What I was trying to get at is that usually people think that you can't go above 150, but then again, it's no good to have the wrong powder. Know what I mean?



Maybe the OP should look into adjustable gas plugs?

Powder should be relatively close to the same burn rate as what the rifle was designed for. The gas system doesn't regulate itself like the M14 so full pressure will be bled off into the cylinder. Ouch time for your op rod/receiver heel with slower powders and heavy bullets.

You don't need an adjustable gas plug unless you want to shoot heavier than 180. I have taken LC 173's out to 800 yds. without any gas system modifications.

ElvenSoul
02-14-2012, 12:04 PM
Just send your Garand into Mr. Shuff and he can fix it to fire anything on the market for 30-06. Puts in a unbreakable rod & adjustable gas system.

rojocorsa
02-14-2012, 2:42 PM
Powder should be relatively close to the same burn rate as what the rifle was designed for. The gas system doesn't regulate itself like the M14 so full pressure will be bled off into the cylinder. Ouch time for your op rod/receiver heel with slower powders and heavy bullets.

You don't need an adjustable gas plug unless you want to shoot heavier than 180. I have taken LC 173's out to 800 yds. without any gas system modifications.

This would explain why the rifle of one guy I know is always malfunctioning. Despite being warned by me and someone else, he's probably ran a couple hundred rounds of 165-180s in there--all commercial. The damn thing vomits it's partially filled clip sometimes, doesn't feed right and jams, and I heard that its disconnector does not even work properly anymore. The sad part is that nothing will get done, and if it breaks his mom can buy him a new one. You read that right. Poor Garand.

Divernhunter
02-14-2012, 5:28 PM
Hornady make a M1 Garand ammo. I hand load but only with 147(mil bullets) or 150 gr bullets and the powder the rifle was designed around which is IMR 4895. I know some other powders/bullets can be used and if the rifle is modified still more can be used. However I just figure it is best , for me, to feed it what it was designed for.

Regular commercial ammo will damage a non-modified M1 Garand.

kendog4570
02-14-2012, 5:39 PM
The rifle was also designed with consideration to the 30 Cal M1 round which had a 172 grain bullet. 30 M2 ball replaced the 30 M1 ammo, and it became the machine gun round. 175's will work fine in the rifle.
Like others have posted, stay away from commercial ammo, unless it is specifically for the M1 like the new Hornady stuff.

Springfield45
02-14-2012, 5:46 PM
I would like to point out that the original sights were designed for the 150 Grain M2 ball. And they work very well by setting your elevation nob to the desired range in yards. Heavier bullets, slower or faster speeds will have a different impact than the sights are set for.

rojocorsa
02-14-2012, 7:10 PM
I would like to point out that the original sights were designed for the 150 Grain M2 ball. And they work very well by setting your elevation nob to the desired range in yards. Heavier bullets, slower or faster speeds will have a different impact than the sights are set for.

Wait a minute, wouldn't the original sights be calibrated for M-1 ball, since it came first? :confused:

EricClay
02-14-2012, 7:18 PM
You guys might find this article of interest. Bullet weight, powder speed, etc are just one variable in what determines the final pressures seen in the gas cylinder.

[M1 Garand Gas Cycle] (http://www.garandgear.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=106:shooting-commercial-ammunition-in-your-m1-garand&catid=39)

Eric

rojocorsa
02-14-2012, 7:53 PM
Thanks for sharing, that was interesting.

SideWinder11
02-14-2012, 8:10 PM
These are the ones I reload with. They are close to the M2 Ball

http://www.hornady.com/store/30-Cal-.308-150-gr-FMJ-BT/