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View Full Version : Live in more than one state...


Thecrazyone1
02-09-2012, 11:00 AM
I live in CA but I also live in Nevada / Hawaii from time to time (with my parents). Is it possible to buy an offlist gun in Nevada / Hawaii and register it when I come back to CA?

Lives_In_Fresno
02-09-2012, 11:03 AM
It is more clean for your parents to take up shooting, buy one, and transfer it to you after they get tired of it.

dexter9659
02-09-2012, 11:15 AM
You may purchase a non-roster handgun in NV. You may then bring it into CA, unless it is a CA AW. Assembled magazines that come with the gun that hold 11+ rounds may not enter CA (unless you are LEO). Unless you are a new resident to CA, you will not be required to register the handgun. You only must register handguns if you are a new resident, or purchase a handgun in CA. There is no law that requires all handguns to be registered.

Correct me if I am wrong here. And no I am not a lawyer.

ckprax
02-09-2012, 12:12 PM
You may purchase a non-roster handgun in NV. You may then bring it into CA, unless it is a CA AW. Assembled magazines that come with the gun that hold 11+ rounds may not enter CA (unless you are LEO). Unless you are a new resident to CA, you will not be required to register the handgun. You only must register handguns if you are a new resident, or purchase a handgun in CA. There is no law that requires all handguns to be registered.

Correct me if I am wrong here. And no I am not a lawyer.

You are correct that no law requires all handguns to be registered, however all handguns that are imported into the state must be sold or registered within 60 days of bringing them in. New resident or duel resident, it does not matter.

To the OP, what state is on your DL? Yes you can purchase firearms in NV or HI but you must meet that states residency requirements.

Ubermcoupe
02-09-2012, 12:15 PM
Have your parents in NV buy it as a gift for you and have it shipped to a dealer here that understands intrafamilial roster exempt purchases and you'll be good to go.

Or you could just do the SSE thing. :shrug:

Librarian
02-09-2012, 12:17 PM
you must meet that states residency requirements.

That's the critical item; dual residency is not rare, but it is uncommon enough and dependent on the states involved.

See also the CGF wiki -- http://wiki.calgunsfoundation.org/Federal_residency_requirements

Ubermcoupe
02-09-2012, 12:20 PM
That's the critical item; dual residency is not rare, but it is uncommon enough and dependent on the states involved.

See also the CGF wiki -- http://wiki.calgunsfoundation.org/Federal_residency_requirements

Lib,

Didn't the REAL ID act of '05 essentially make that an impossibility (unless you keep buying a new DL every time you switch residencies?)

gatesbox
02-09-2012, 12:43 PM
I have been thinking about buying a house up in Oregon near where my wife and I grew up. We will probably live there for a period of time in winter and in summer. My wife and kids will probably stay extended periods of time, while I am down here working. We will also likely rent out this home as a vacation rental. This will be the only home we would own (we rent in CA). If I'm not mistaken we will dwell in the state long enough, pay taxes on rental income, pay utilities, have banking accounts in state, possible even have a dedicated vehicle on premises registered in OR. I think we might be able to claim residency in OR....

Then the question is, how do you get ID, or what do you use for ID when purchasing firearms? Maybe an OR ID card and not a drivers license?

Librarian
02-09-2012, 12:47 PM
Lib,

Didn't the REAL ID act of '05 essentially make that an impossibility (unless you keep buying a new DL every time you switch residencies?)

I don't know; generally, not my can of worms.

I kind of grudgingly acknowledge the existence of dual residency, because I know it happens, but I think the exact method of determining that for any one person is just none of my business. Since, from what I can gather, states are not consistent with one another on how to determine residency (I think California has like four different methods, each for a different thing), there are just too many variables for me to keep track of.