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the86d
01-26-2012, 8:20 AM
We have a 9mm pistol, and a complete 5.56 NATO AR 1:8 20" HBAR (and 2 more lowers, maybe 22lr, and 9mm soon).

I am looking at a Dillon XL 650 totaling $1000ish with most desired attachments.

9mm) $20+t/100 rounds @Walmart actual
.223) $39+t/100 rounds @Walmart actual

M855[Lake City]) $149[no tax]/420 rounds @Multiple places on the Internet with free shipping, or $149ish including shipping on others.

Is it that Google is playing stupid, or am I just not looking in the right place (keywords funky) for saving money on reloading 9mm and .223/5.56 bullets?

It just doesn't look like I would be saving money by reloading even if purchased in bulk, let alone factoring in the cost of the setup I would like [above].

It appears the only way to save money is to really use pulled M855 projectiles, which would cause "accuracy issues", and I know I could pay for accuracy, but looking to keep cost down with moderate accuracy (M855 :) ).

Would I save money reloading in the long run due to the combined-components not really being cheaper than pre-fab rounds, even reusing brass? Correct me if I am wrong (then drop a link to inexpensive projectiles to prove you right :):):) . )

Please advise...

DarkSoul
01-26-2012, 8:35 AM
It will really boil down to how often you shoot, and how much you shoot when you do. Once you put down the initial flop for the reloading equipment, you can be reloading for about 40-70% less than factory new ammo.

You do need to buy in bulk to really see the cost savings. I usually buy at least 16 pounds of powder at a time along with 5k-10k of primers. Doing the bulk will save you a lot since there is usually a $25 HazMat fee for shipping on these items. Also, bullets you will want to get at least 1k-2k at a time to take advantage of better shipping rates.

Also, brass, you will really benefit from making sure to recycle all your brass. Common straight wall brass is a snap to recondition, and should last you easily 8-10 reloads, necked rifle brass is a little more intensive to recondition well, but again, time is cheap (usually :rolleyes: ).

I have been buying my powder and primers from Natchez Gun Supply, they are very quick, and have huge inventory, and I have recently been buying bullets from the Bullet Works.

Personally, I shoot a .45 and .223 (and sometimes a 9mm) and I probably go through 1500-2000 rounds a month, so for me, its more than worth it, and I probably recovered the cost of the equipment within a few months. I did the math, and using pickup brass, .45 is costing me about .17 per round, and .223 at about .21 per round. 9mm I think was about .11 per round, obviously MUCH cheaper than new.

Retzius
01-26-2012, 8:53 AM
I haven't saved anything reloading... Prolly spent more.

But... It's the most satisfying aspect of shooting I have gotten into so far :)

the86d
01-26-2012, 9:05 AM
I have no problem spending the same, or more, as long as the returns on "FUN", "ENJOYMENT", along with "QUANTITY & QUALITY" outweigh the cost. :)

I really only need twice the bang for the buck as a final outcome... to be in heaven.

pepsi2451
01-26-2012, 11:12 AM
You can get 1000 Hornady 55 gr fmj bullets for $106 at powder valley. They also have wolf primers for $15.50 per 1000 and h335 powder for $17.90. You could get everything you need to reload 1000 rounds except the brass for $193. You can probably get bullets cheaper somewhere else but I have had good luck with the Hornady bullets.

I haven't tried any pulled bullets but I have heard of people getting good accuracy from them. Midway has pulled m855 bullets for 84.99 per 1000.

I haven't tried them but Precision Delta has fmj 9mm bullets for $76 per 1000.

I usually buy all my powder and primers at powder valley. They have a good selection and good prices.

AlexKintner
01-26-2012, 11:37 AM
For 55gr 223 or 9mm I personally wouldn't do it. If you are looking for match grade 223 it is definitely worth it. I'm collecting right now in preparation for my Garand coming soon. For 30/06 it pays off in just a few hundred rounds of commercial.

Divernhunter
01-26-2012, 11:44 AM
Enjoy another gun related hobby? Yes. Shoot more? Yes. Save "TOTAL CASH SPENT EACH YEAR"? NO! Especially with 9mm and 223 ammo at the cost of cheaper ammo vrs cost of reloading ammo. Things could change but that is the way it is now. However it is a great hobby. BTW You will spend in excess of $1500 to set up a Dillon in 9mm and 223 or 45ACP as I did.

CEDaytonaRydr
01-26-2012, 11:44 AM
I think reloading is definitely worth it but then again, I shoot some fairly "oddball" calibers, so it just makes sense...

I like making my own Makarov brass out of 9mm Luger and if I waited for commercial ammo to become available for my Krag, it would just sit in the safe the whole time! I do reload for 5.56mm but really because I want precision for my Varmiter AR, not because I'm trying to save a bunch of money. I don't even bother reloading 9mm because (until I bought my P1 last month) I only owned one 9mm pistol and I would shoot maybe 100rnds a month. I couldn't really justify it because 50rnds of 9mm luger is still only about $10-$15 retail...

For .40S&W and .45 ACP, its a no-brainer (especially for .45 ACP). Ammo for .45, specifically, has gone through the roof lately! I keep every bit of .45 brass that I can get my grubby, little hand on. I even keep the crappy NT cases... :o

Low-Pressure
01-26-2012, 11:46 AM
I reload 9mm, 40s&w, 45acp, 223rem, 7.5x55 and 30-06. Yes it saves you money, if not that it lets you shoot more for less. I only have a single stage press, and I do small batches at a time. It's also a good hobby for me, helps me get away from my daily grind.

Dark Mod
01-26-2012, 11:53 AM
with those two calibers you would be hard pressed to see much in the way of savings, you happen to want to reload the 2 cheapest calibers in the universe.

Back in the days when i was using a single stage press, i didnt load them. Now that i have moved up to a progressive it makes more sense.

Precision delta has 1k 9mm jacketed bullets for about $85 or thereabouts, add $40 for primer and powder and thats about $125 per 1k for 9mm vs $165 buying reloads

If i can get in on the Xtreme bullet group buy i can drop that to $54 for the bullets, bringing my total cost to around $95 per 1000

Hunt
01-26-2012, 12:13 PM
you should be able to cut the group size in 1/2 by tuning the load to the gun, and in some cases improve velocity as well. You can also create mission specific ammo, for example I reload for mule deer hunting so I want an accurate long range flat shooting bullet. I can get another 100 or so yards shooting flat, (no holdover) with a custom tuned load. Using the right bullet minimizes meat damage as well. If I expect to be canyon blasting I can switch up to a heavier high BC VLD and almost double my effective range with holdover. Tough to achieve this type of customization with factory ammo especially at a fraction of the cost.

KeithET
01-26-2012, 12:36 PM
For 223 and 9mm bulk buying will get you some savings on standard rounds. The big savings come when making something not so standard. For precision stuff reloading is the cheapest way to go and can provide some darn fine accuracy.

One thing not mentioned in this thread is availability. Not to long ago you could not buy any 223 or 9mm at a reasonable price anywhere(or other calibers for that mater). As a reloader that had been buying in bulk for many years this was not a problem for me. When I wanted to shoot and needed ammo, I just fired up the reloader and made what ever I wanted using stock on hand purchased before the shortages occurred.

Just another angle on what makes reloading the way to go.

KeithET

Shoobee
01-26-2012, 12:45 PM
We have a 9mm pistol, and a complete 5.56 NATO AR 1:8 20" HBAR (and 2 more lowers, maybe 22lr, and 9mm soon).

I am looking at a Dillon XL 650 totaling $1000ish with most desired attachments.

9mm) $20+t/100 rounds @Walmart actual
.223) $49+t/100 rounds @Walmart actual

M855[Lake City]) $149[no tax]/420 rounds @Multiple places on the Internet with free shipping, or $149ish including shipping on others.

Is it that Google is playing stupid, or am I just not looking in the right place (keywords funky) for saving money on reloading 9mm and .223/5.56 bullets?

It just doesn't look like I would be saving money by reloading even if purchased in bulk, let alone factoring in the cost of the setup I would like [above].

It appears the only way to save money is to really use pulled M855 projectiles, which would cause "accuracy issues", and I know I could pay for accuracy, but looking to keep cost down with moderate accuracy (M855 :) ).

Would I save money reloading in the long run due to the combined-components not really being cheaper than pre-fab rounds, even reusing brass? Correct me if I am wrong (then drop a link to inexpensive projectiles to prove you right :):):) . )

Please advise...

Reloading is tedious. That means boring. Back breaking boring.

Unless you are shooting matches or taking half mile shots, you don't need precision ammo. And that's the main advantage of reloading rifle ammo.

Reloading pistol ammo is a complete waste of time, in my opinion.

Shoobee
01-26-2012, 12:46 PM
I think reloading is definitely worth it but then again, I shoot some fairly "oddball" calibers, so it just makes sense...

I like making my own Makarov brass out of 9mm Luger and if I waited for commercial ammo to become available for my Krag, it would just sit in the safe the whole time! I do reload for 5.56mm but really because I want precision for my Varmiter AR, not because I'm trying to save a bunch of money. I don't even bother reloading 9mm because (until I bought my P1 last month) I only owned one 9mm pistol and I would shoot maybe 1000rnds a month. I couldn't really justify it because 50rnds of 9mm luger is still only about $10-$15 retail...

For .40S&W and .45 ACP, its a no-brainer (especially for .45 ACP). Ammo for .45, specifically, has gone through the roof lately! I keep every bit of .45 brass that I can get my grubby, little hand on. I even keep the crappy NT cases... :o

Agreed, that if you shoot really unusual ammo, then reloading may be your only choice.

Waldog
01-26-2012, 1:12 PM
Reloading is tedious. That means boring. Back breaking boring.

Unless you are shooting matches or taking half mile shots, you don't need precision ammo. And that's the main advantage of reloading rifle ammo.

Reloading pistol ammo is a complete waste of time, in my opinion.


:jump:

Shoobee
01-26-2012, 1:14 PM
:jump:

So youre mad as hell now or you completely agree?

I could not tell from your sign language.

jonzer77
01-26-2012, 1:47 PM
Reloading is tedious. That means boring. Back breaking boring.

Unless you are shooting matches or taking half mile shots, you don't need precision ammo. And that's the main advantage of reloading rifle ammo.

Reloading pistol ammo is a complete waste of time, in my opinion.


:facepalm:

I load for 45, 9mm, and 38 super and I can load about 300-400 rounds in an hour which is more then enough for a range trip.

Factory ammo
45 $400/1000
9 $200/1000
38 super $400/1000

Reloads that shoot better then factory ammo
45 $110-150/1000
9 $85/1000
38 super $85/1000

Now this is assuming you have your own brass but as long as it is a common caliber you can pick that stuff at the range.

Dark Mod
01-26-2012, 2:17 PM
Reloading is tedious. That means boring. Back breaking boring.

Unless you are shooting matches or taking half mile shots, you don't need precision ammo. And that's the main advantage of reloading rifle ammo.

Reloading pistol ammo is a complete waste of time, in my opinion.

The main reason for reloading rifle ammo is price, at least for me. Im not into precision shooting, but even if i was i would still be saving money.

I can produce ammo that shoots the same or better than factory ammunition for a fraction of the price.

Take .30-30 for example. Buying it for $13 a box (On a good day) comes out to $650 per 1000. There arent even any decent priced commercial reloaders that make it.

I can make .30-30 all day long at $200 per 1000, thats not even trying. Ever try to buy non magnetic 7.62x54r in bulk? good luck. When you can find it, its usually $20+ per box.

I save tons on pistol calibers too, and its half the work. I can Churn out .357 magnum hollowpoints for $180 per thousand, Jacketed. Try and find a box of .357 magnum for under $10, hollowpoints or not. The ammo i make is just as good if not better than most production ammo out there.

I wont fight you on 9mm, it never made sense for me to load it until i got a progressive press. But even then, i can save about $65 per thousand for a few hours worth of work.

You dont need to shoot more if you dont want to, i dont. I didnt magically find an extra free day a week to spend shooting once i started reloading. I still shoot the same as i did before, but i have an enourmous stockpile of ammo.

Instead buying $500 of ammo and having it last a couple months, i spend $500 on components and it lasts 6.

KeithET
01-26-2012, 2:53 PM
Reloading is tedious. That means boring. Back breaking boring.

Unless you are shooting matches or taking half mile shots, you don't need precision ammo. And that's the main advantage of reloading rifle ammo.

Reloading pistol ammo is a complete waste of time, in my opinion.

Reloading does take a mindset that many are not capable of. For those that can address the "tedious" aspects of reloading its definitely not a waste of time. The tedious aspect of reloading is nothing more then attention to detail which is not that hard to do.

With my Dillon 550 in a couple hours I can load ~1000 rounds of pistol ammo which will save me big $$$ over factory stuff. All of this translates to more range time. :cool2: Not a waste of time.

Reloading for rifle is only a little more involved for low cost range ammo which is equivalent to any of the cheep stuff and still translates to saving money. For greater accuracy the details become more important so the amount of ammo produced in a given time will go down depending on how many details are being addressed.

Like any hobby you get out of it what you put in. If attention to details is going to be considered tedious then it may not be the right hobby. I find it a very relaxing hobby for the most part.

Just a little more perspective.

KeithET

Bill Steele
01-26-2012, 3:19 PM
I think for someone that thinks reloading is back breaking boring, not reloading seems like a good choice.

I have to agree with many that say you probably won't save any money in absolute terms, as any savings you get will likely find its way into more ammo which will undoubtably find its way into one of your magazines. Thus, you will likely just shoot more.

Frankly, nothing warms my heart more than someone who prefers to buy factory ammo in bulk, blast away at the same range I shoot at and walk away at the end of the session, leaving the brass at my feet as I move into the station the shooter just vacated. Buying once fired brass is a big part of my reloading costs, so all I can say to the person who prefers not to reload is: Thank You.

Javi
01-26-2012, 3:28 PM
I wont fight you on 9mm, it never made sense for me to load it until i got a progressive press. But even then, i can save about $65 per thousand for a few hours worth of work.

Reloading hollowpoints in 9mm seems good to me. I looked up some prices on Midway 2 weeks ago for bullets and brass and I found that it's only $30 for the two (hornady bullets, starline brass)instead of $20-25 for a box of 20 :)

CEDaytonaRydr
01-26-2012, 5:20 PM
Agreed, that if you shoot really unusual ammo, then reloading may be your only choice.


I don't have it as bad as some do. Ever meet a Martini Henry owner? :eek:

Commercial ammo is about $100 for a box of 20 and reloading for it is very challenging. I want one!!! :43:

Divernhunter
01-26-2012, 5:41 PM
The hard to find and odd ball cartridges are nice to reload for. I have several such as 50bmg/6.5&7.7Jap/303Brit/30-40Krag/6.5X55Swede/7.5Swiss and more. There I save most per round and really can afford to shoot more. If I did not reload then I either would not own them or I would shoot them very compared to what I do shoot now.

Waldog
01-26-2012, 7:32 PM
So youre mad as hell now or you completely agree?

I could not tell from your sign language.

I'm laughing my head off!!!

But, to each his own. Certainly don't agree. Certainly not angry.

17+1
01-26-2012, 7:48 PM
Reloading is tedious. That means boring. Back breaking boring.

Unless you are shooting matches or taking half mile shots, you don't need precision ammo. And that's the main advantage of reloading rifle ammo.

Reloading pistol ammo is a complete waste of time, in my opinion.

I really enjoy loading my own rifle ammo. Gives you so much more opportunities to build a cartridge for your application and firearm.

Agreed on handgun ammo...I don't really like handguns. You can tell because I only have 3. ;)

jbilling85
01-26-2012, 10:08 PM
I'm biased, but yes.

haha Short answer.


Worth and value of anything is placed upon something by the individual. What's it worth to you? :-)

Monetary terms, I've sunk easily over 1k$ in this and that. I've made thousands of rounds and still am unsure whether or not I've hit the black ink. Do I care? Nope! I love doing it.

I will assert that it's not for those with short attention spans. Kind of like lake fishing. You'll sit there for hours, much of that probably without company, so if you can space out or like to have free time to think to yourself, this hobby works for you.

bohoki
01-26-2012, 10:51 PM
it only became worth it in 9mm when i started casting, for 223 its really only about me making quality ammo for the price of wolf

erik_26
01-26-2012, 10:53 PM
From a noobs perspective.

I just started reloading. Total investment $1500.

This includes material to build a solid work bench, Dillon 550B and accessories. Conversion kits for 9mm, .40 S&W and .45 ACP. Plus dies and everything else needed (press related). Plus a scale, two tumblers, calipers, a book, new shop light, bullet puller, media separator…. Etc.

I have been saving tons for brass for the past year. So I have ~3K+ of 9mm, ~2.5K of 45 and ~1K of 40. Plus thousands of round for rifles. And about 500 of .44 magnum and a couple hundred of .38 spl.

My reloading plans have been and are still to reload in phases. I am starting with the 9, 40 and 45 for a while. That is enough to take a hit in the pocket book and keep me entertained.

The second phase will get me into 5.56 and .44 magnum. And the 3rd phase will get me into .38 spl and whatever else tickles my fancy. I will buy all this stuff a few months or so down the road.

I have periods of a lot of down time. I work a rotating 12 hour shift. So I get clumps of days off. While the kids are in school and the wife is doing her craft hobby, I wander out to the garage and keep busy.

What I have learned so far is that it can be very pain staking at first. When I setup to start loading I do lots of quality control. Throw & weigh lots of powder to verify consistency. Measure all the rounds. Verify primers are seating right…. Etc. Once I get comfortable that everything is as it should I work into a groove and can start pumping out some rounds. I do quality control at every primer reload (100 rounds).

So my initial startup time is ~ 15-20 minutes. Then I can put out about 250-300+ rounds and hour.

I will only work for a couple hours. And I don’t always reload the whole time. I still have a 5-gal bucket of mixed brass to sort. I get both tumblers tumbling. Stage for the next reload…. Etc.

What I am getting at with all this, is not the financial investment (which is significant) but the time investment. It is really important to not feel rushed or to try to get a last minute batch out the night before heading to the range.

Plus you will find yourself spending lots of money because of a high volume deals. It is very satisfying to make your own stock pile of ammo.

Too finally answer the question, past the initial investment and time needed, it is very much a savings vs. factory ammo. But reloading isn’t for everyone.

Your time and a lower volume of shooting may make factory ammo the right option for you.

IntoForever
01-26-2012, 11:36 PM
Sometimes you can get deals on components. I got lucky and found semi-wadcutters for my .45 at $11/500. I don't mind sitting back and relaxing while reloading as I find it relaxing. My time (based on hourly wage) vs. savings isn't worth it except I'm reloading while not working anyways.

the86d
01-27-2012, 6:41 AM
I would like to get a .44 Magnum, or a .357 Magnum lever action in the future and cast my own rounds, so this is a prep for this also.

Alrighty, you ALL convinced me! Hahahaaa!

Update: After doing the calculations if I purchase 2000 components for 55gn .223 FMJ Hornady, powder, primers, shipping (overestimated on the high end), and UPS' Hazmat fee these would cost roughly $0.2648 per round to press myself, vs $0.431 (including sales TAX) for the Walmart Federal (I think it was Federal) .223 FMJ 100 round pack. (This is not including the cleaning & polishing media or compound for the prep, but WAY phrackin' worth it especially if I buy pulled M855 instead and save even more!)

It would just take some time to recoup the press cost, since I have no property, but I WOULD STILL be saving a BUNCH in the long run.

stand125
01-27-2012, 4:47 PM
I make a box of plated 115gr 9mm for $5.50 a box that will out shoot any commercial ammo so I think that 9mm is worth reloading. I use a Lee turret press so 15 minutes per box saves me between $5.00 to $10.00 bucks a box for brass cases very accurate ammo.

chesterthehero
01-27-2012, 7:44 PM
if i only count the 9mm that i reload i paid for my setup (rcbs turret, powder, primers, bullets) in the first 3-4 months.. the second time i had to purchase primers/powder/bullets i got to enjoy the discounted costs... from here out its all savings which means i can shoot a lot more for the same or slighly less..

Lead Waster
01-27-2012, 10:41 PM
I wont fight you on 9mm, it never made sense for me to load it until i got a progressive press. But even then, i can save about $65 per thousand for a few hours worth of work.



You can also earn more than $65 for a few hours work. But then again, nobody is paying me to sit on the couch and watch TV at night!

I may be weird, but I get a sort of satisfaction from taking a bunch of brass and turning out a small container of shiny rounds!

I just ordered 2k of 9mm fmj from precision delta. I just ran out of my Berry's plated bullets and thought, why am I paying the same price for plated that fmj goes for? (Well, OK, FMJ bullets have exposed lead on the bottom!)

WoodrowShootist
01-28-2012, 1:59 AM
i couldn't afford to shoot as much as i do if it wasn't for reloading. being able to shoot 2x-4x for the same price as factory...it's a no brainer.

the first thing i thought about when i got into reloading wasn't the economics but was making a round that meets my needs. my research told me that anything i would load would be cheaper than factory. so i said hell yea and dove right into reloading.

i reload a lot of 9mm and it costs me .10-.13/rnd depending on the deal on components. sure you can buy reloads for $165/k. i save 30 a case and 30 bucks is 30 bucks. one more thing is that i'm a competitive shooter and with that are requirements for ammo. that $165 ammo doesn't make power factor, it's too slow. and my $100-130 case of ammo makes power factor, recoils less, is quieter and is cheaper...kind of a no brainer.

45acp really shines in savings. my recipe costs the same as my 9mm (.10-.13). i still am amazed by that and it makes shooting that 45 so much more fun knowing that it costs me $100 for 1000rnds of 45! hahaha and time is no issue, there's a learning curve and once you get it the speed comes naturally. i load 1k/hour no problem.

WoodrowShootist
01-28-2012, 2:17 AM
here's the components i use. i use cheap components and learn them. loading is very educational too. it's added another dimension to my shooting. by understanding why the load behaves the way it does and how i can tune the load or the gun for it. i dont reload rifle so i can't provide anything there.
pistol powder: clays, 231, hs6 (in order of preference)

primers: tula/wolf, winchester (in order of preference)

brass: mixed

bullets: precision bullets, bear creek, xtreme, rainier, hsc (in order of preference)

no website for bear creek. xtreme, rainier and hsc are more expensive and no free shipping. best to be bought in group buys, gun shows or on here. but i like precision bullets the most.

www.precisionbullets.com

the86d
01-28-2012, 4:34 AM
Hey gentlemen, I'm new to this reloading stuff,so I have some questions. How can I learn to reload? and What equipment do I need? Are there "how to" videos or books that are recommended? How did you guys learn this? Is it dangerous to reload?

I was talking to a coworker, and I started watching youtube videos about presses. Do a youtube search for "XL 650", "dillon 550", "hornady reload", "lee reload" all with no quotes to see some people reloading, and come back here with searches. I found that a google search for "calguns <search keywords>" sometimes yields better results than a calguns search.

All the other info can be found via Google. :)

It looks as though many powders can vary greatly from one to another, and you could possibly have REALLY DANGEROUSLY HIGH PRESSURE issues if you took Mr. Internet's advice as to how many grains of powder to load, therefore all powder manufactures list loading data on their site for their powder, start with the POWDER MFR SPECS. This is what I figured out BEFORE making my first purchase, although I have not started yet (she is in the mail, come Monday). :)

Lead Waster
01-28-2012, 8:42 AM
You will save money per round. The number of rounds you choose to use per month is up to you.

So yes, you will definitely save money, even with 9mm. It might only be a buck or two, and many might not consider the time spent as worth that buck or two, but that's your decision. I happily reload 9mm. I can't stand to see all that 9mm brass sitting on the range floor being swept into a big bin for someone else to reload!

The equipment (if you don't completely abuse it) is so durable that you can resell it decades later and recover probably 80% of your cost. So consider it a rental :p

the86d
02-12-2012, 5:54 AM
Update:
TOTAL OF RELOADING 9MM 0.158516606/ Per Round FOR Berry's "Plated"
WALMART 9MM FMJ 0.21539225

TOTAL RELOADING COST PER ROUND 0.151413682 FOR M855 pulls including everything, but my time.
WALMART .223 FMJ 0.420225

This IS including the primers, powder, etc. I would save even MORE if I was to buy powder and primers in bulk off the Internet even WITH the Haz-Mat Fee AND shipping...

When you learn the errors of your ways (DON'T OVER LUBE, and once you figure out how to flip the case feed for pistol cases,) you can REALLY CRANK AMMO OUT OF A XL 650!

Divernhunter
02-12-2012, 10:22 AM
I suggest you not load. There are getting too many reloaders and it is driving the prices up for stuff. Especially surplus bullets. It also is making it harder for us to scarf up free brass at the range etc. Too many people are saving it. All of this runs up my reloading costs.

mikeyr
02-13-2012, 10:06 AM
I recently got back into shooting after putting away the guns for about 25+ years, I reloaded back then because I shot (still do) a WWII 9mm Luger and a .30 Luger both guns tend to be finicky with their ammo and I could get very reliable shooting guns by reloading. It was not savings that decided it at the time.

Now I bought a Beretta 9mm (92FS) and with it bought a Dillon 650xl, I did not think if it would save money although I know it does, its the fun of reloading and customizing the load to the gun. Its easier in my mind to blow a $100+ one time in the store and reload as needed then go spend $20 each time I want to shoot for an hour. I am loading primarily 9mm, some .30, some .357 and .38special, I did have several thousands 9mm brass hanging around from when I used to shoot, still had bullets too, just had to buy powder to restart.

Reloading is fun, I found it harder than i thought to go from a rockchucker 25 years to the 650 but no squibs and now I have the rhythm down pretty good. Its not just about the money, its about best accuracy too.