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View Full Version : Could this possibly be considered a flash hider?


GeneralBacardi
03-19-2007, 2:50 PM
http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/productdetail.aspx?p=5594&s=13016

wildcard
03-19-2007, 2:53 PM
Don't think so. Aside from it being called a compensator, it makes no claims to reducing the flash signature.

-hanko
03-19-2007, 2:55 PM
http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/productdetail.aspx?p=5594&s=13016
I would consider it a muzzle brake (compensator) v. a flash hider...fh's usually have the business end considerably larger that the bullet diameter...this one looks more or less the same diameter at the front end.

Who knows what the doj thinks.

-hanko

dfletcher
03-19-2007, 3:10 PM
So we have flash hiders, muzzle brakes and now compensators - well 2 out of 3 being legal ain't bad. I think I'd keep a bill of sale with me from Brownells with the nomenclature "compensator" on it.

xenophobe
03-19-2007, 3:17 PM
A muzzle break is the same thing as a recoil compensator...

goldfinger
03-19-2007, 3:32 PM
can anybody tell me the difference between a muzzle brake and a flash hider?

luvtolean
03-19-2007, 3:42 PM
can anybody tell me the difference between a muzzle brake and a flash hider?

Good luck. The DOJ certainly doesn't know.

As mentioned before, if the exit of the device is reduced down to roughly the caliber, and not wide open, it's a compensator.

Mr. Mildot
03-19-2007, 5:05 PM
can anybody tell me the difference between a muzzle brake and a flash hider?

Yes. A muzzle brake helps to "brake" the muzzle, so you don't shoot too fast and injure yourself. It also helps the police stop you WHEN (and you will) finally snap and decide to end it all but take out an elementary school with you.

A flash hider on the other hand is a dastardly device that helps you to "hide" as you do your killing. Never mind the extremely loud noise of your rifle, the smoke, flying chell casings, leaves and twigs from the bush you're hinding in with your ghillie suit on, if you can "hide" that flash, then you are a real military style killer just waiting for the right moment.

Oswald2001
03-19-2007, 6:02 PM
Thanks!

That sums it up very well.

Now I don't need to watch the news to find that info. :D

kantstudien
03-19-2007, 7:45 PM
No expansion chamber = not a flash hider.

Satex
03-19-2007, 8:05 PM
The CA DOJ reserves the right to call anything you put on the end of your muzzle a flash hider. Read Hunt Vs. CA DOJ and Iggy's declaration. They have "an analysis" they perform to determine if a device is a flash hider. What the process and criteria of the "analysis" is not known.

Glasshat
03-19-2007, 10:37 PM
I understand how the small hole in a muzzle brake forces the hot gas to blow out the holes in the side of the muzzle brake when a bullet passes through. That is pretty simple. On the other hand, what exactly happens in a flash supressor to reduce flash seen by the shooter? The bullet passes through the device, which may have holes on the side similar to a brake, but since the exit hole is much larger than the bullet the gas is not forced out the side of the FS. So what is happening to reduce the appearance of flash behind the gun? Sorry if this is a newb question but I want to know.

mark3lb
03-19-2007, 10:53 PM
No need to be sorry. I would like to know too as I am interested in OLL rifles in the future

adamsreeftank
03-19-2007, 11:40 PM
Directs all of the muzzle blast and apparent noise away from your ears for increased shooting comfort. Large, single expansion chamber helps control muzzle flip and felt recoil

Let's see. It says it directs the blast (flash) and sound away from the shooter and it has an expansion chamber. I'm guessing it could easily be ruled a flash hider, if not a supressor.

Personally, I'd stay away. Especially on a gripless build.

Also, the small hole, large hole rules isn't valid. The Springfield M1A muzzle break has a large opening. I think some flash hiders have small openings also. A flash hider works by creating an area where the un-burnt gas has a chance to expand and dissipate before it is ignited. A muzzle break re-directs the gas to counteract the force of the recoil.