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unsped
03-07-2007, 4:34 PM
delete

!@#$
03-07-2007, 6:22 PM
it should be a blurry hole.


there are 2 sized aperatures on the a2 sight. maybe you should flip to the smaller size aperature. if that is still a huge blurry hole then you need a NM sight.

the a1 sights aperatures are the same size.

i don't know about screw in aperatures in an ar but you could get a NM rear sight.

ocabj
03-07-2007, 7:29 PM
It shouldn't look like a blurry hole. The rear sight itself won't be in focus, because you'll be focusing on the front sight (and have the target image slightly less focused), but you should have a clear image when looking through the rear sight.

If you have a standard military sized rear aperture and the image is not clear when you look through it with the nose near or touching the charging handle on the AR, then you may have bad eyes.

Some people just don't have eyes to use aperture sights, but this is usually with older people, or anyone with serious vision issues.

But if you're saying that the rear sight itself is out of focus, that's because it's supposed to be.

Satex
03-07-2007, 7:39 PM
Always focus on the front sight and don't try to change your focus between the target, front sight, and rear sight.

kap
03-07-2007, 11:40 PM
hrmm i never heard to focus on the front sight

That is probably why you are no good with iron sights. You are bound to increase your accuracy if you focus on your front sight.

otalps
03-07-2007, 11:47 PM
Look for the lollypop made of the front site and the target.

leelaw
03-07-2007, 11:51 PM
Focus on the front sight. Target and rear sight should be blurred. If you keep focusing from front sight to rear sight to target and back, you will throw off your shots and lose concentration.

Pthfndr
03-08-2007, 12:24 AM
just crazy to hear about people shooting irons at 300 yards and consistently hitting body targets.

People (Palma competitors) shoot 10 inch X rings at 1000 yards with regularity using iron sights. I have personally witnessed more than one shoot 10 out of 10 shots in the X ring at 1K.

alpha_romeo_XV
03-08-2007, 10:29 AM
There is a reason Sharpshooters have been using rear peep sights since the begining, from the tang sights on early lever guns through 1903's, Garands, M14's and M16. There was a long thread a couple weeks ago if you search "sight picture + peep sights" that may be helpful to you. I did install a small aperature hooded sight in one of my AR A3 detachable handles. Link http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=640139
It helps with various lighting conditions only. Focus on the front post (or front aperature if you use a globe front) and practice, practice, practice. Try using a military type target - black circle with white background with the sun at your back for good contrast.

cadjak
03-08-2007, 11:31 AM
I had been shooting for years (or I thought I was) and never asked any questions. I figured it was all self explanatory. I point the barrel at my intended target, look at my sights and then "sort of" fire. I was okay on some days and lousy on others. Then out of the blue, someone said, "just focus on the front sight". The world changed and I am a 100% better shot since then. Good shooting instruction is worth the money.

MrTuffPaws
03-08-2007, 11:53 AM
The problem that some people have have with irons is that when you focus on the front sight, the target gets blury. This is normal and you just have to deal with it. Not to mention that with the rifle targets we use at the local range, my front sight post is wider than the black center of the target at 100 yards.

Top of the sight post in the center of the blur, relax, pull trigger, smile, walk to target, see horrid grouping, mount red dot and be done with it :D

xrMike
03-08-2007, 12:23 PM
Top of the sight post in the center of the blur, relax, pull trigger, smile, walk to target, see horrid grouping, mount red dot and be done with it :DThis raises a question I've been wondering about for awhile... With irons, is it better to use a 6 o'clock hold, or a point of aim (center of bullseye) hold? I've always used 6:00.

My reasoning ==> It ought to be easier to see when the ball is balanced on the stick, rather than see when the stick is in the exact center of the ball (how do you know for sure you're in the middle, when half your bull is covered by your front sight?)

I really ought to experiment and try a POA hold sometime and see how it groups...

ocabj
03-08-2007, 1:05 PM
This raises a question I've been wondering about for awhile... With irons, is it better to use a 6 o'clock hold, or a point of aim (center of bullseye) hold? I've always used 6:00.

My reasoning ==> It ought to be easier to see when the ball is balanced on the stick, rather than see when the stick is in the exact center of the ball (how do you know for sure you're in the middle, when half your bull is covered by your front sight?)

I really ought to experiment and try a POA hold sometime and see how it groups...

There is no easy answer for this question.

6 o'clock hold is the easiest to learn, but harder to master.

You should learn how to shoot both, especially in Service Rifle high power.

Different lighting conditions will cause your eye to interpret the image of the target differently. There will be times when the target black will appear larger or smaller than it actually is due to the angle of the sun, mirage, and other environmental factors. If you use a 6 o'clock hold, you will end up hitting higher or lower than expected. The only way to counter this is to use a center hold, since no matter how small or large the black appears to be, the center will always be center.

Personally, I use center hold for standing, and 6 o'clock for everything else.

The reason why I use center hold for standing is because it is easier for me to call my shot with a center hold, and it is easier for me to know when to break the trigger. Also, with center hold while standing, as long as the top of my front sight post is in the black, I know I will shoot a 9 at worst. It's a lot harder for me to know when to break the shot with a 6 o'clock hold while standing. With all that wobble, it's hard to concentrate and wait for that perfect moment with the tip of the post is at the bottom of the black and center.

I use 6 o'clock hold for all other positions since it is easier to get the perfect alignment. You are more stable in the position sitting and prone (especially) and can stay on target perfectly for at least a few seconds.

Also, depending on your preferences, you may opt for a front sight post that is the same width as the black in your sight picture. This will make center hold a lot easier since all you have to do is put the post in between the diameter of the black to know you are centered perfectly. It also gives you a good indicator if you are holding left or right of center.

xrMike
03-08-2007, 2:00 PM
Copying-and-pasting that one into my Stuff_ocabj_said.txt file... Thanks. The guy that keeps kicking my butt every month at the local club also uses a center hold. I have been resisting trying it, for some dumb reason.

I will try it out this weekend. Sometimes you ought to just try something, instead of letting your brain tell you what's best.

dfletcher
03-08-2007, 5:07 PM
You haven't said whether you are using a peep rear and post front or globe front, but the talk of 6 o'clock hold indicates a post. I have a Remington 40X with a Redfield Olympic rear peep (Parker Hale adjustable peep with color filters & eyepiece) and a Redfield International globe front. The rifle will shoot 3 bullets, 1 hole all day long at 100 yds.

I find the peep rear/globe front is the most accurate for me and I use a bullseye hold. You must match your front globe to the size of your target and adjust the rear peep to leave a bit of daylight around the outside of the front globe. Basically, you want to have the appearance of looking down a funnel with the target as the end point in the center. I'm sure I've done a mediocre job of describing it, but it seems to me it's one of those things that comes naturally, much as your eye naturally wants to center the front globe in the peep & the target inside the globe.

When I do use a post I use a 6 o'clock hold. I find the sliver of daylight between the top of the post & target is a finer aiming point.

If your eyesight is not up to par you may want to check out Merit - they specialize in iron sight shooting & have been around for years.

anotherted
03-08-2007, 5:39 PM
Not this again:)

definitely give the 6 o'clock hold a try. Some like it some dont. I find it the easiest.

dfletcher
03-08-2007, 5:49 PM
I'm not very good at the computer & links, check out Merit Sight company at the Brownells and E A Brown Company website, also at Sinclair shooting supplies and Champions Choice.

The old steel Redfield peep & Parker Hales are long gone, check out EBay using Redfield sight or Lyman sight for the most hits on used - their are typically alot offered. Brownells offers Lyman globe fronts.