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View Full Version : How to introduce SHTF survival to family members?


NytWolf
12-06-2011, 3:46 PM
I have contemplating introducing SHTF survival and planning to my family members. But how do I do to would-be skeptics and also keep it low profile at the same time? In other words, how can I introduce the ideas but also keep the people who don't care about "wanting in" out?

What would be the best way? Just jump to the SHTF survival? Introduction to possible SHTF scenarios first? Introduction to firearms handling?

Should I have just a gathering? A slideshow presentation?

Ideas, please.

stix213
12-06-2011, 3:54 PM
I don't think you can. They either believe its possible for Safeway to one day stop stocking their shelves or they don't in my experience. If they already understand the danger, then you just need to talk to them about what the possible ramifications are that they may not have thought much about yet.

I know plenty of people who see no reason to store any extra food or water for any reason. They think they can just go to the store, or the government will provide.

NytWolf
12-06-2011, 3:58 PM
I did forget to mention one important thing. The reason why I want to introduce it to them is not so that they can prepare on their own. I want it to be a family effort -- more funds equals more stash. Also, there will be more people to defend the stash in the event of someone trying to take over.

amd64
12-06-2011, 4:55 PM
It's something they have to take ownership of and do on their own. If they are able bodied and have the finances, there is no excuse.

Some people complain that it's too expensive to prepare, yet they spend thousands of dollars on unnecessary things that will be useless in an emergency. And they'll be the first ones knocking on your door expecting you to provide them with supplies when SHTF.

Don't knock yourself out trying to change people. At most, just ask if they have emergency supplies and plans when the next infrastructure destroying earthquake hits CA. If they don't, and don't show any interest in doing anything for themselves, just disassociate. Not worth it, you'll just end up doing all the work and funding for them. If they show interest, then share info to help them.

kwansao
12-06-2011, 5:02 PM
The best you can do is point out that we're overdue for a big earthquake, we are one of north korea's first targets, people are discontent and rioting all over the world, and look at how much help FEMA was in new Orleans. You can expect them to buy about four gallons of water and some canned food that they won't regard as emergency supply. Good luck. Come up with a printed itemized list of what you want to buy, what situations it would cover and how much they would be contributing. Im still trying to convince my family.

Ripon83
12-06-2011, 5:38 PM
Get them to read: "One Second After"
Done.

Maximusmax51
12-06-2011, 5:40 PM
Have them watch the Road

jp1911
12-06-2011, 5:44 PM
I have been down this road myself. What helped me was most of the family members I approached had been threw a disaster (flood). So I built off of that. Not sure of your location but disasters happen everywhere so keep focus on what happens in your area. Next I went to FEMAs web sight they have a list as to what they recommend to have and a time line on when you can expect help, most sceptics when they see something from a gov agency they tend to look at it different then some tin foil hat idea. Then I went on to go over FEMAs short falls during disasters. You have to take baby steps at first. But as soon as they catch on and realize its a good idea. Then you can take them to next steps 72hr, 1 week, 1month, 1 year. And as soon as the issue of security hit them in the face and it will, then you introduce firearms. Good Luck hope this helps.

cranemech
12-06-2011, 5:48 PM
Maybe let them borrow a couple of the "prepper" books like "One second after" or "Lights out" or some of the free online prepper stories by Jerry D. Young.

http://www.jerrydyoung.com/news.php

Use those to start a dialogue, gauge their reactions and decide from there.

cudakidd
12-06-2011, 10:07 PM
dress like a zombie and burst through the front door!

IrishPirate
12-06-2011, 10:17 PM
disaster movie marathon!!!
:popcorn:

lots of camping!!!

thenodnarb
12-06-2011, 10:25 PM
Everyone is worried about something. Find what they worry about and use that as the focus when you talk to them. I was surprised how many people are actually into SHTF prepping. Eventually they talked to ME about it. Now, for the family members who really aren't interested in prepping at all, then all you can do is prep for them by adding to your stash. You love them, and when they need help, you'll help. Hopefully a small SHTF event wakes them up(like the power outages recently) and they will get on board.

problemchild
12-06-2011, 10:52 PM
Give me your address. Ill come over with 12 guys, cut your power and terrorize your family all night. The next day you can have that talk with your family.:D

Problem solved.....

G-forceJunkie
12-06-2011, 11:23 PM
Pull their main breaker on friday, lockout the box, and tell them to deal with it for 24-48 hrs. The unprepardness will be obvious.

Saym14
12-06-2011, 11:54 PM
rent Book of Eli. and a few others.

Stormfeather
12-07-2011, 1:48 AM
Give me your address. Ill come over with 12 guys, cut your power and terrorize your family all night. The next day you can have that talk with your family.:D

Problem solved.....

See! This is why I like CGN, folks are always willing to lend a hand and help other members out, heck, sometimes even help out members familys!:thumbsup:

Head416
12-07-2011, 8:04 AM
To a lot of people "prepping" sounds crazy. So approach it as disaster preparedness. People are comfortable with that. Ask them what they would do if an earthquake left all of Southern California with no power for two weeks, the stores were empty and looted, and they had no water or gas coming to their house. Once they get on board with that you just start extending the timeframe with "what-ifs".

I haven't converted anybody with this yet, I'm still working on my wife, and I'm a recent convert as it is.

Eljay
12-07-2011, 9:02 AM
To a lot of people "prepping" sounds crazy. So approach it as disaster preparedness. People are comfortable with that. Ask them what they would do if an earthquake left all of Southern California with no power for two weeks, the stores were empty and looted, and they had no water or gas coming to their house. Once they get on board with that you just start extending the timeframe with "what-ifs".

I haven't converted anybody with this yet, I'm still working on my wife, and I'm a recent convert as it is.

Absolutely. There's no point in going on and on about exotic stuff if they're not prepared for an earthquake. They know they ought to have that stuff already, but probably don't. They may or may not know that the recommendations have changed from 3 days to 7 days of food/water. To win that argument you pretty much just have to say "Katrina". Mention that there's no actual stock in the back of the grocery stores because of the just in time systems - that's something that changed since back in the day. And if they're not willing to get a couple of extra flats of water for $3.75 each at Costco and maybe a couple of six packs of canned soup or chili or something else they'll actually go through eventually and won't be wasted they're not going to do anything. But if they *do* get that stuff, you can mention first aid kids, flashlights, etc. and build from there.

ocmsrzr
12-07-2011, 9:22 AM
Start small and get some level of commitment back from them before you really start laying it all out for them. My GF was receptive to the prepper mindset but I needed to structure her start for her. I bought a nice Rubbermaid locking cabinet and had it shipped to her place. It's in her garage and I started her out with water, batteries and some meds/medical supplies. She has jumped in feet first with the food supplies and has adopted the idea, that every time she goes grocery shopping, something is bought specifficlly to go into the survival cabinet.

Don't laugh but watching the Walking Dead together has helped a lot as well. LoL

WokMaster1
12-07-2011, 9:27 AM
Turn off the gas, power & water to your house before they wake up. See how they handle it.

Panchira!
12-07-2011, 11:41 AM
In my experience it's better to take a slow approach. Explain to them calmly why you need to be prepared. If they don't want to a all then well you'll have to make a tuff decession. M parents are finally understanding why I am getting prepared whic shocked me! They were like stfu and gtfo! Now they are like yeah your kind of right. Work it slowly and calmly. Better late then never.

For me if they show now intrest at all and tell me to stick it where the sun don't shine then I simply tell them not to come to my place then. Also limit the amount of people you tell about you prepping. Only invite people you 100% trust.

NytWolf
12-07-2011, 12:03 PM
Wow! Thanks for all the suggestions, both good ones and bad ones. LOL

I personally wouldn't try sabotage to get their attention and get them onboard, but the suggestions have me thinking and I think I'm on the right path now. I guess I have to be more realistic about some of the responses I will get.

Thanks again.

G-forceJunkie
12-07-2011, 12:31 PM
Play the earthquake angle. Its going to happen in california, and its due. Landers in the 70's, Northridge in the 90's... At least have them get a 72 hr plan together, then work on it from there.

echo1
12-07-2011, 12:55 PM
Yes, I agree with the practical approach. If they're Kali occupants, then work the earthquake aspect, thrown in with a dash of FEMAs nowhere to be found. There's people still without power from last weeks high winds. If some seem to be receptive and actually get started, then drop the "Did I mention that the gangbangers want your wife and daughter as sex slaves" bomb. Also, don't forget that you can choose your friends, but you can't choose your family. Blood doesn't automatically make all welcome at the table. When the soccer moms go feral, it's going to get ugly. PAX

mindwip
12-07-2011, 1:23 PM
There is only one "movie" you need to watch. Well i forgot! i have it at home and will look up its name after work. Forcing the issue will not work. And using far out there examples will not help especially coming from "dad".

Its part documentary part acting, a virus outbreak occurs leaving a small family to survive basically by them self. The dad is a medic and really the only one with his head on his shoulders. They go through no power, running out of food, escaping the city, trying to find a place to escape to, etc.
Lots of good tips! There are specialist during it explaining how every event they mention has happened in the past and how that same event will be different or the same in today's life style. The first thing my friends wife said after watching it was "we need to get supplies". The end is a little to out there for me but overall one of the best movies/what could happen.

Its well done and nothing during the first 2/3 is so out there that people will say "oh this would never happen"

Salty
12-07-2011, 1:37 PM
Don't call it "SHTF", call it "Earthquake/flood/extended power outage preparedness", and don't be a mall ninja goon about it. Using your fancy new camp stove, sleeping bags, tent, water filtration system, flashlights, etc, on a camp out is also a great way to "justify" the purchases, have a fun time, and get everyone familiar with the equipment.

If they've ever been trapped inside a house due to flooding, or tried to shop at Safeway by flashlight during a major storm they probably won't need much convincing though. Again, just don't get all mall ninja about it.

Salty
12-07-2011, 1:44 PM
There's people still without power from last weeks high winds.

Great current example.
Cities like Boulder Creek ran out of gas, propane, generators, etc. Schools and businesses closed down temporarily as well.

Taidaisher
12-07-2011, 1:59 PM
There's people still without power from last weeks high winds.

I've been on the prepper path for a while now and my wife is, though not fully on board, understanding of my concerns.

We had a discussion about the winds last night. I used to my advantage to get her to see the importance of prepping. I have some things, but am definitely ready for a loss of power for that amount of time.

Absolutely play the natural disaster angle. Once you get them thinking along the proper lines, start to throw in references to the economy and civil unrest, and play the "what would we do" game.

Good luck.

jmsenk
12-07-2011, 2:00 PM
It also depends on what part of your family you're talking to. If this is the wife and kids, then it might be easier to bring it up as camping, boy scout skills, bonding time, and what if's, etc. If this is the in-laws, or adult siblings with thier own families and worries, then it might be more difficult than that. My brother and I are good at ridiculing one another into doing stuff. We're always competing with each other - instead of "keeping up with the jones' " it turns into "Staying tougher than the siblings" - which is fun (for our family anyway)

NytWolf
12-07-2011, 3:06 PM
Don't call it "SHTF", call it "Earthquake/flood/extended power outage preparedness",

I definitely wouldn't use the SHTF or TEOTWAWKI acronyms. Eventually I will embark upon those terms, but not as an intro.

It also depends on what part of your family you're talking to. If this is the wife and kids, then it might be easier to bring it up as camping, boy scout skills, bonding time, and what if's, etc. If this is the in-laws, or adult siblings with thier own families and worries, then it might be more difficult than that. My brother and I are good at ridiculing one another into doing stuff. We're always competing with each other - instead of "keeping up with the jones' " it turns into "Staying tougher than the siblings" - which is fun (for our family anyway)

My wife is definitely onboard already, and my kids are too young to know. This would definitely be siblings, in-laws, first cousins, etc. Some friends qualify too. There are some with skills out there that would be helpful in a SHTF situation, but they would have to be on the same page as everyone.

MFortie
12-07-2011, 3:58 PM
We're including 'preps' (crank radio, lanterns, e-rats) in our Christmas exchange gifts this year -- that should get some interesting discussion going on Christmas day! ;)

Ripon83
12-07-2011, 4:23 PM
Uncle Jim has been giving nephews and nieces ounces of silver for holidays and events for a decade. Hope they are hoarding them.....no one ever says and I'm fine with that.

We're including 'preps' (crank radio, lanterns, e-rats) in our Christmas exchange gifts this year -- that should get some interesting discussion going on Christmas day! ;)

mcsoupman
12-07-2011, 4:30 PM
Great thoughts. +1 on the general talk and citing current examples. Power outs last week, fires in San Diego last year, Tsunami in Nor Cal earlier this year, and the ever present threat of an Earthquake. All are very relevant! What about even the PGE exploding city block from last year.

You can also use this link. I think he does an ok job talking through it.

http://www.thesurvivalpodcast.com/getting-your-spouse-on-board-with-survival-planning

MrsFS
12-07-2011, 6:45 PM
I must admit that I am a little reluctant at times when the hubby wants to spend money on some of the prepping supplies. The in-laws kinda chuckled when we started storing boxes of Costco water in the garage. They changed their tune when the water turned off one day and my mother-in-law had hair dye in her hair and had no way to wash it out except for the water in the garage.
I agree that you should start small with earthquake preparedness. Then maybe involve them in activities that require "certain" skills, gardening, canning, solar cooking, shooting etc. You could teach them and they would just think they are doing something fun.
My friends at work think I am a little out there when I have talked about prepping. Then they say, "I will just come to your house", to which I reply, "you better have some tangible goods or some serious skills if you expect me to let you in'
Good Luck.

QQQ
12-07-2011, 9:50 PM
My friends at work think I am a little out there when I have talked about prepping. Then they say, "I will just come to your house", to which I reply, "you better have some tangible goods or some serious skills if you expect me to let you in'
Good Luck.

Yup. I generally don't talk about my preps, but when they come up in a conversation I occasionally hear, "I know who to visit when there's a disaster!"
My response: "Sure. If you can figure out where I live and bring ammo, water, and/or supermodels!"

alfred1222
12-07-2011, 10:46 PM
are the people in your family adults, or are we talking a wife and children? i think if theyre grown, you should tell them the general idea

echo1
12-08-2011, 10:37 AM
Then they say, "I will just come to your house", to which I reply, "you better have some tangible goods or some serious skills if you expect me to let you in'.
In general this. But there's good folks in my crew too broke, or just starting out with young families, with not much extra ducats. But they're like minded and armed. Luckily our comminity as a whole is close. PAX

Leoshik
12-08-2011, 10:44 AM
There is only one "movie" you need to watch. Well i forgot! i have it at home and will look up its name after work. Forcing the issue will not work.

It's the History Channel docudrama called "After Armageddon". It's a good watch for anyone who is unsure about what to really expect during a disaster scenario.

I couldn't find it on Netflix, but it is available on youtube in 9 low quality parts.

Link to Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8r97xoSOEjM

Panchira!
12-08-2011, 10:51 AM
Yep that show is a good one to watch. I have it on my dvr a great way to introduce someone to the idea.

arslin
12-08-2011, 3:06 PM
My wife is Russian. So with the economic collapse, it is not a hard sell. She may not want to think about it, but she understands it. We just moved from Bakersfield to San Diego. That gave me a bit more wiggel room. The crime is higher here. When there was an assault at her school, I mentioned that the police had stopped me because I fit the description of a carjacker that they were looking for in our area (that is what I get for not skipping a day on shaving). I have not purchased the gun yet... And I do not have "permission" but it is known that I am looking. The purchase should go down this weekend (wish me luck). Most of the stuff I am buying now is under the "just in case" tag line. I quietly just buying more food... Problem is, I can't store much. 1 year + is only a dream. My wife called me nuts when I even put a bit of food in a bag that was in the garage 2 years ago... True, moths did got to most of it, but my mind was pointed in the right direction (if not the right place).

America has had hundreds of years of stability. But think (ok read) back 100 years. All the country folk of that time had food stored. We are not nuts. My father-n-law is a very smart man that lived thru, and prospered, in hard times in an honest way. This was not easy... He Does not speak a word of English, but he told me, "If America falls, the world is doomed"

Stop hogging the tin-foil!

Allentu
12-09-2011, 4:04 AM
That is a very good question and a question I have yet to answer myself. I like some of the response to the OP. I too sound like I have my share of the tin foil hat whenever I speak of anything related to SHTF stuff. I hate to say it...but the truth is...my family is doomed if SHTF events do happen. I can't do it all myself, my high school brother barly knows how to use a screw driver and my mom can't speak/read english and wouldn't know her way around the city even if there was a typical detour on a street. DOOMED I TELL YOU!!! Anyone else want to wear the tin hat now? *side note* I still have to finish my bug out bag

Trapper
12-09-2011, 8:06 AM
I agree with the others, start slowly and do not use the term SHTF. Show them some of the disaster preparedness kits for sale on the Red Cross web site. You may want to look into map reading and navigation courses available at REI. Focus the health and cost benefits of growing and canning your own food.

Capt Jack
12-09-2011, 9:42 AM
Ironically, I know plenty of people who have lived in CA all their lives and don't give earthquakes a second thought! Having been through my share including the bad one in the SF Bay in '89, I can tell you, no water/food is no fun! Furthermore, I went to college in Florida so I've done the Hurricane thing too and when its about to hit, the grocery stores are EMPTY! No joke, everything that could possibly be useful is sold out. The first time I saw it, I couldn't believe it and what little there was left was not easy to get! I do not want to go thru that again...

Now as far as helping others understand the importance of this, I suspect that your family will either understand or they will pay it lip service and not give it a second thought.

In my case, I am giving earthquake kits that have food, water, a flashlight, radio, batteries, a small first aid kit and some disaster info to everyone in the fam nearby. At least they will have a little something if their water or power goes out. Its the best I can do for them, otherwise, just store a bit extra since after all, it is your family!

Trevolution
12-09-2011, 1:13 PM
Once I moved out on my own about 8 months ago I started considering the idea of "what if?" Don't get me wrong, I'm not a paranoid individual, but I consider myself to be one that enjoys preparedness. So far I've stockpiled around 20 gallons of water, 2 gallons of bleach, 40 pounds of white rice, 10 cans of chili, and around 20 cans of tuna. I read people state "stock what you eat and eat what you stock" and it hit home. Sure, my stash isn't much, but it is a start and the cost has been minimal. My wife took to it right away once I used logic and facts and she agreed that it's better to be safe than sorry, (which opened the gates to Firearms Ave. heh). On the other hand, I'm pretty much the only individual that stocks a SHTF stash except for one other family of a friend. My family doesn't take to it and is usually the first one to say they trust the government and don't worry about a disaster ever. If there was ever a large tsunami though we're done for and we'd have to leave (being in the empty soup bowl the central valley is), but at least I would have a good start on knowing what to take.

mindwip
12-09-2011, 5:55 PM
"After Armageddon"

Thanks! i kept searching for How to survive Armageddon, How to survive the plague, lol.


I guess i am lucky my dad stores extra water and food, i do the same and since my dad owns a food distribution business, well lets just say food wont be a problem for us. My bug out bag is my camping back. I am too lazy and cheap to make a dedicated one.

zeke2517
12-10-2011, 12:51 AM
It has been fun reading this thread and reading alot ofthe same things that i have heard and/or experienced. From the, "not wanting to get invovled" people to the "im just gonna come over to your house" ppl. I have a group of close friends that have all agreed on a place if the SHTF place, and all these friends will (if possible) bring their mobile supplies and skills to that place. ALSO these friends all contribute $50 per month the the group fund for purchasing needed supplies (ie radios, solar charge panels, ammo, etc.) so be careful what you ask for because you might end up with a "group" that you feel responsible for.