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Ripon83
12-03-2011, 8:05 AM
Single man, age 30, decent shape, working well below his talents and thus with low income tells me he's concerned about things and wants to prepare. He can't bear to spend more than $100 probably every 4 months or $300 a year. He already owns firearms, some ammunition, and has about 120 gallons of water stored up at his place. He asked me mostly about food to which he has no preparations.

$100.00 to spend on basic food preparations for one person? He wants to make his first purchase provide for him as long as possible and have the longest possible shelf life.

Suggestions?

thenodnarb
12-03-2011, 8:21 AM
$100 will go a long way at honeyville. For storage he can get free buckets from bakeries. He should go with bulk beans and MAYBE some wheat. The reason I say maybe is that its best to have a grinder of some sort so you don't have to eat just sprouts, and that grinder will factor into his cost.I'm sure problemchild will chime in with his suggestions from honeyville. If he isn't near a honeyville, or if it was me, I'd probably just do one of those freeze dried kits for 1 person for 7 days or so. IMO, good tasting, easy food is the first thing to store since it will cover the most likely scenarios(storms, power outages, earthquakes) which prevent you from traveling to some degree, or disrupt supply chains. After that, he can start buying longer term food storage, or rather, bulk foods.

ocmsrzr
12-03-2011, 8:30 AM
The GF and I were pretty impressed with the Bear Creek dry soup mixes. Read about them here, liked them so much they are going in the food locker AND the daily use pantry.

r3dn3ck
12-03-2011, 9:22 AM
bulk grains and beans, 5 gallon buckets and oxy absorbers. he should definitely not choose just "wheat" there are many many great grains which don't need to be ground to be used. Rice is barf. Spelt, Quinoa, amaranth, sorghum, barley, and then what kind of wheat he'll actually need (different wheat for different uses). Seeds are a good stock item, so is dried corn. I would have and have stock(ed) up on Sardines. They're massively nutritious, compact and come with a small water supply in each can. They also have a low fecal response. Add some several hundred cans to the supply and food won't be your first worry. Vitamins too.. people think food is just that. Food is calories for sure but a varied diet is needed to get all the nutrients, so use multi-vitamins as a hedge against deficiency.

Got Stuff?
12-03-2011, 10:06 AM
If he's a new prepper with no preps and possibly a beginner in the food prep area I may suggest starting out with a few cases of MRE's. Then move up from there.

Bulk grains, beans, bugs, O2 absorbers, buckets, mylar, labeling, multiple products, etc. can be a lot to tackle when starting out.

With a few cases of (very portable) MRE's and the water already stored, he can quickly and easily be prepped for a week. That's a good start. That will buy time to save more $$ and learn/get help with serious prepping.

Got Stuff?
12-03-2011, 10:11 AM
The GF and I were pretty impressed with the Bear Creek dry soup mixes. Read about them here, liked them so much they are going in the food locker AND the daily use pantry.

I recently did a review on some potato soup that I've had stored for @12 years and was pleasantly surprised. It's good stuff!

Here's the link.
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=499410&highlight=bear+creek

r3dn3ck
12-03-2011, 10:31 AM
If he's a new prepper with no preps and possibly a beginner in the food prep area I may suggest starting out with a few cases of MRE's. Then move up from there.

Bulk grains, beans, bugs, O2 absorbers, buckets, mylar, labeling, multiple products, etc. can be a lot to tackle when starting out.

With a few cases of (very portable) MRE's and the water already stored, he can quickly and easily be prepped for a week. That's a good start. That will buy time to save more $$ and learn/get help with serious prepping.

I used to think that way but then I decided that it makes it cost twice as much and sets you up to be just another zombie out wandering the earth looking for food just one week in to a major event. Why not have enough to have time to get stable and get a crop in. Even if the event is short and you don't have to plant crops at least you only bought 1 set of supplies.

If it's too much to tackle then he can wander the earth with the rest of those that found living to be just to damned much hassle.

Chaparral
12-03-2011, 10:50 AM
In addition to the bulk staples, he might want to start cultivating a small biointensive garden plot. It should be small at first, maybe 4 x 10 feet or whereabouts. For around 20 dollars or so, John Jeavon's book "How to Grow More Vegetables" is the one to get. Follow the directions in the book to the letter about preparing the soil and the bed.

Got Stuff?
12-03-2011, 11:07 AM
Everyone is different but I took into account the OP's statements.

If he is starting at 0 preps; for $100 (his max budget), he can have enough food for a week....today! Not in a week or month but right now.

Then, when more $$ comes in he can get going on the long term preps, bulk grains, etc.

If you can't survive the first week......you are not going to be doing any gardening or farming or using any of those 300 buckets of grain you have stored in the garage

Chaparral
12-03-2011, 11:20 AM
A five gallon bucket from Home Depot will hold a good amount of pasta from Sams Club (that 5.00 for six pounds stuff) a 10 lb bag of rice, 10 lb of pinto beans from Costco etc. For 30.00 one could probably get and fill one of those buckets with 8-12 lb of three different foods. I've stuffed about 30 to 40 lbs of food, left in the original packaging into each six gallon bucket. I can grab one bucket and have instant variety, albeit at a small money and larger space cost. He could make the exterior of the bucket all crappy looking and then write "waste oil" along with a big skull and crossbones on it with a big sharpie marker. If he travels around in a pickup truck, such a bucket could be stored in the tailgate with tools and equipment and rotated frequently enough to mitigate the degrading effects of higher temps. That should get him through the first week easily.

slagusmc
12-03-2011, 9:48 PM
I have MRE's in the for sale section for $30 a case for a bulk buy, along with alot of other great "prepper" stuff, at that price, he could have a few weeks worth for $100..one MRE a day can support life, 2 MRES a day is very comfortable living..

Scowdrey
12-04-2011, 2:16 AM
What time frame is he prepping for? Start small and short-term. Start with water and food for 1-2 weeks. Highest likely disasters would still allow him to stay home and not have to bug out. Stock up on what he eats now - soups, Dinty Moore stew, cans of vegies/fruits, packs/cans of tuna, salmon, chicken; Twinkies and M&Ms. Why complicate it?

Shellshocker66
12-04-2011, 8:40 AM
I always loved the $5 a week prepping thread over on the survivalist forum. Which now I can't find over there but I did copy and paste the starting thread onto my desktop.

so reprinted from Survivalistforum.com

For just $ 5.00 +/- you can buy the following storable things:

FOOD ITEMS

Five packages of Idahoan instant potatoes (flavored)
A case of ramen noodles (20 pkgs)
five cans of sardines
five gallons of purified water
nearly two cases of bottled water
four cans of peaches, pears or fruit cockatail
2 jars of mandarin oranges
five pounds of rice
three to four pounds of spaghetti
Two cans of spaghetti sauce
three bags of egg noodles
eight packages of gravy mix
four cans of whole or sliced new potatos
four cans of green beans or at least three cans of carrots, greens, peas or mixed veggies
Two cans of Yams
six cans of pork and beans
one 40 ounce can of Dinty Moore Beef Stew
Two 12 ounce cans of chicken, tuna or roast beef
One 1lb canned ham
three cans of refried beans
three 12 oz cans of raviolis or spaghetti O's.
Two 12.5 ounce cans of Salmon
Five pounds of Oatmeal
Four packages Dinty Moore heat and eat meals
five packages of corn bread mix
Four pounds of Sugar
Five pound of Flour
1.5 quarts of cooking oil
three one pound bags of dry beans
two cans of apple juice
a jar of peanut butter
two boxes of yeast
two bags of generic breakfast cereal
10 8 oz cans of tomato paste/tomato sauce
four cans of soup
four cans of Chunky soup
8-10 pounds of Iodized salt
two bottles of garlic powder or other spices
Two boxes of kool aid
A can of coffee
2 bottles of powdered coffee creamer



Non-Food Items

one manual can opener
two bottles of camp stove fuel
100 rounds of .22lr ammo
25 rounds of 12 ga birdshot or small game loads
20 rounds of Monarch 7.62x39 ammo
a spool of 12lb test monofilament fishing line
2 packages of hooks and some sinkers or corks.
artificial lure
two packages of soft plastic worms
three Bic Lighters or two big boxes of matches
A package of tea lights
50 ft of para cord
a roll of duct tape
a box of nails or other fasteners
a flashlight
two D-batteries, four AA or AAA batteries or two 9v batteries
a toothbrush and tooth paste
a bag of disposable razors
eight bars of ivory soap (it floats)
a box or tampons or bag of pads for the ladies
two gallons of bleach
needles and thread
a ball of yarn


OTC Medications (at Dollar General)

2 bottles 1000 count 500 mg generic Tylenol (acetometaphin)
2 bottles 500 count 200 mg generic advil (ibuprofen)
2 boxes 24 cound 25 mg generic Benadryl (diphenhydramine HCI)--also available at walgreens under "sleep aids."
4 bottles 500 count 325 mg aspirin
2 boxes of generic sudafed
4 bottles of alcohol
a box of bandages (4x4)

For someone on a budget I think its a great start!

EmptySkuLL
12-05-2011, 1:43 AM
$100.00 to spend on basic food preparations for one person? He wants to make his first purchase provide for him as long as possible and have the longest possible shelf life.

Pretty hard to beat bulk beans & quick oats. Yes he will get bored to death of eating it, but he wont actually die for quite awhile. Im not saying its the most nutritionally sound choice, but for his price point & shelf life criteria and for straight survival eating (not luxury eating) it should do.

A 50lb bag of quick oats at Honeyville was $28.87 (in store sale price)
25lb bag of small red (chili) beans $23.12 (in store, although I think costco is cheaper)
3 buckets w/ lids $6.93 ea = $20.79 (or he can scrounge some for free)
3 mylar bucket bags $1.69 ea = $5.07
Pack (100) of o2 absorbers $10 (or maybe he can get a few free from some friends).
If he can score buckets & o2 absorbers from somewhere, then thats another $31.79 for beans or grains.
Hell if youre using mylar bags you dont even really need buckets, just something to protect the mylar bag from getting punctured or damaged (storage bin, cardboard box, totes, luggage, ice chest, milk crate, etc)...

Grand total $87.85 (plus tax)...

And I can assure you that this at the very minimum is going to last you longer than 5 cases of MRE's. (and will outlast MRE's in shelf life).

The next few trips he makes, just pick up a different grain and legume (bean), or expand into other bulk items.

akjunkie
12-05-2011, 6:48 AM
Single man, age 30, decent shape, working well below his talents and thus with low income tells me he's concerned about things and wants to prepare. He can't bear to spend more than $100 probably every 4 months or $300 a year. He already owns firearms, some ammunition, and has about 120 gallons of water stored up at his place. He asked me mostly about food to which he has no preparations.

$100.00 to spend on basic food preparations for one person? He wants to make his first purchase provide for him as long as possible and have the longest possible shelf life.

Suggestions?

Send this link to your buddy. Assuming Canned for averages $1/each He can stock up on 300cans. Stored @ the right Temp it should last him Several Decades.

http://grandpappy.info/hshelff.htm

problemchild
12-05-2011, 7:54 AM
If this is just a test I say get a second job and buy more stuff.