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View Full Version : How to hide "blemishes" on lower?


eje
03-01-2007, 9:05 AM
Last night I assembled an AR lower and let's just say that when it was over, the lower was not as cosmetically pleasing as it was when I began!:D There are a couple small nicks and I'd like to hide them if possible. Any suggestions?

PIRATE14
03-01-2007, 9:09 AM
Last night I assembled an AR lower and let's just say that when it was over, the lower was not as cosmetically pleasing as it was when I began!:D There are a couple small nicks and I'd like to hide them if possible. Any suggestions?

ALUMA BLACK......Birch Casey product......:D

luvtolean
03-01-2007, 9:13 AM
If you have Break Free CLP, shake the bottle up good, coat the lower until it's wet and let it sit. Wipe it off (if it's a new lower it will probably all be absorbed the first time or two) only when you're ready to use it next.

You'd be surprised what this will hide.

eje
03-01-2007, 9:15 AM
Thanks guys! The Aluma Black sounds like it's what I need. ;)

schizrade2
03-01-2007, 9:21 AM
Last night I assembled an AR lower and let's just say that when it was over, the lower was not as cosmetically pleasing as it was when I began!:D There are a couple small nicks and I'd like to hide them if possible. Any suggestions?

How about toss it around and use it. That will even out the blemishes... :rolleyes:

iridesportbikes
03-01-2007, 9:24 AM
How about toss it around and use it. That will even out the blemishes... :rolleyes:


+1 yesssss

eje
03-01-2007, 9:25 AM
How about toss it around and use it. That will even out the blemishes... :rolleyes:

haha:D

P08
03-01-2007, 9:31 AM
Try a sharpie marker, works well. Blend in with a tissue, or leave on for darker finish,

Jicko
03-01-2007, 9:42 AM
I tried sharpie on my DPMS handguard... it doesn't work! Maybe cuz the scratch is about 1" and it is a little shiny/polished...

shinigami
03-01-2007, 11:06 AM
Just what the others said, toss it around more to even out the scratches..:D

Mine worked well with a sharpie.... also tried the CLP route. But I don't really care how it looks, as long as it goes BANG, that's enough for me.

AJAX22
03-01-2007, 11:09 AM
If its just gonna look pretty, they sell a much cheaper version at Toy's R Us, I'ts flourescent pink but it goes good with a petty coat and it won't chip your nails as much.

:D

markymark
03-01-2007, 11:52 AM
Try a sharpie marker, works well. Blend in with a tissue, or leave on for darker finish,

That's what I used and I'll use it again in the future!

Technical Ted
03-01-2007, 11:59 AM
Birchwood Casey Super Black Pen (Basically a flat black Testor's enamel paint marker). Works well on spots like the steel bolt catch, trigger guard roll pins and the surrounding aluminum that's been nicked during installation. Once it cures, it's solvent proof.

Birchwood Casey Alumi Black doesn't work well on all aluminum alloys.

bu-bye
03-01-2007, 12:01 PM
you could always use the hem of your dress to cover the spots:rolleyes: J/K:D

I have learned that unless the firearm has personal, historical or financial value don't even bother trying to keep every bit of dust off of it. Its a tool, use it like one:D

DRM6000
03-01-2007, 12:06 PM
it's going to get scratched, nicked, chipped with use anyway so just forget about it. the first blemish will hurt, but the subsequent ones won't matter much.

Technical Ted
03-01-2007, 12:09 PM
you could always use the hem of your dress to cover the spots:rolleyes: J/K:D

I have learned that unless the firearm has personal, historical or financial value don't even bother trying to keep every bit of dust off of it. Its a tool, use it like one:D
Some scars add character, but assembly scars show poor mechanical aptitude.

mltrading
03-01-2007, 12:38 PM
it's going to get scratched, nicked, chipped with use anyway so just forget about it. the first blemish will hurt, but the subsequent ones won't matter much.

+1 If you shoot your rifle frequently, you will forget those inperfection.

Or.... put a sticker on your receiver. Some time ago, a member put an airsoft warning label on his lower. That was funny.:D

TMC
03-01-2007, 12:46 PM
Scratches give it character, leave them.

I actually took emory cloth to one of my rifles to give it all the high point wear like the one's in the photos of the guys in Iraq. Looks right to me. Its still new on the inside where is counts.

James R.
03-01-2007, 1:05 PM
Some scars add character, but assembly scars show poor mechanical aptitude.

Couldn't agree more, I don't mind something getting dinged in the course of use nearly as much as I do something being damaged because the wrong tool was used or someone rushed to get it done. Remember haste makes waste...

Even if it doesn't affect the function of the device it's still IMHO a bummer. I wonder if those so casual about dinging up their lowers and the like would feel the same about getting a new car with scratches and chips off the dealer showroom floor? I mean c'mon ultimately your car is going to pick up some chips, dings and scratches, it's a tool right, just drive it.

Regards,

James R.

Technical Ted
03-01-2007, 1:11 PM
I wonder if those so casual about dinging up their lowers and the like would feel the same about getting a new car with scratches and chips off the dealer showroom floor? I mean c'mon ultimately your car is going to pick up some chips, dings and scratches, it's a tool right, just drive it.
You know about those guys who put fake mud splatter on their 4X4s?

James R.
03-01-2007, 2:08 PM
You know about those guys who put fake mud splatter on their 4X4s?

I've never seen fake mud, but I do remember it being trendy in HS to drive your car to school covered top to bottom in mud to show what a bad *** you were for roading it. Sometimes I wondered if they didn't just shovel mud onto their cars becuase it was in places I've never seen that much mud piled due to off roading.

Regards,

James R.

Jicko
03-01-2007, 2:28 PM
Any idea where I can find one locally?

Birchwood Casey Super Black Pen (Basically a flat black Testor's enamel paint marker). Works well on spots like the steel bolt catch, trigger guard roll pins and the surrounding aluminum that's been nicked during installation. Once it cures, it's solvent proof.

Birchwood Casey Alumi Black doesn't work well on all aluminum alloys.

schizrade2
03-01-2007, 3:01 PM
Couldn't agree more, I don't mind something getting dinged in the course of use nearly as much as I do something being damaged because the wrong tool was used or someone rushed to get it done. Remember haste makes waste...

Even if it doesn't affect the function of the device it's still IMHO a bummer. I wonder if those so casual about dinging up their lowers and the like would feel the same about getting a new car with scratches and chips off the dealer showroom floor? I mean c'mon ultimately your car is going to pick up some chips, dings and scratches, it's a tool right, just drive it.

Regards,

James R.

Wow, it is an AR15, not a car. They get scuffed and dinged and scratched like your favorite hammer or a DeWalt Drill. They are to be drug around and used heavily by design. A consumer car is not designed to be drug around, it is for getting from place to place safely and efficiently.... otherwise we would all drive military surplus/spec HMMWVS which ARE made to be drug around and abused.

That would be sweet.

OP, I will borrow your rifle for a month and you will not even notice the blemishes after I am done. :D

Technical Ted
03-01-2007, 3:11 PM
Any idea where I can find one locally?
Just about any gunshop that carries BC gun finish products will have the Super Black pen and Alumi Black in stock. Failing that, a decent hobby shop will have Testor's or Tamiya paint markers in stock (Look for enamel).

James R.
03-01-2007, 3:29 PM
Wow, it is an AR15, not a car. They get scuffed and dinged and scratched like your favorite hammer or a DeWalt Drill. They are to be drug around and used heavily by design. A consumer car is not designed to be drug around, it is for getting from place to place safely and efficiently.... otherwise we would all drive military surplus/spec HMMVS which ARE made to be drug around and abused.

That would be sweet.

OP, I will borrow your rifle for a month and you will not even notice the blemishes after I am done. :D

You're not getting the point. It's something new and as such people tend to like them to look new. It's a shame to ding something up because you were sloppy with your tools or didn't use the correct tools. We've all done it, but I don't feed myself a line of BS that it's ok to do that cause it was going to happen anyways...that's a lazy slob like defeatist attitude. I for one would not be willing to pay new prices for a rifle at a gun store that was riddled with nicks and dings simply because I might ding it up in the future. IMHO It's equally illogical to accept a car riddled with nicks and dings simply because eventually you're going to ding it up in the normal course of use.

I don't spend a lot of time playing boy soldier so I don't roll around on the ground with my rifles and toss them into rocks and the like. They tend to stay in pretty good shape with only what I would consider normal handling wear. Were it a rifle being used in combat I would show it the level of respect required to keep it functional but not pamper it to my own detriment.

Most of us who shoot off the bench, standing or prone aren't going to be beating up our rifles. Anyhow if you don't mind nicks and dings more power to ya. I cringe when I bang up any of my guns...I don't care if it's a combat styled rifle or my O/U clays gun...I treat them all with respect and care.

Regards,

James R.

eje
03-01-2007, 3:31 PM
The cosmetic stuff isn't all that important to me, I was more pissed that I could have avoided bunging up the lower if I had just been a little more careful! :D I plan to shoot this one often and if it gets scratched doing that it won't bother me in the least.

alpha_romeo_XV
03-01-2007, 3:46 PM
eje,
I've shot next to high master shooters on the line in a match and most of their AR's look quite used. I'd never judge anyone on how pretty their rifle was, their range etiquet and score yes. But there are some parts of the rifle I'd try very hard not too scratch for functional reasons - my muzzle crown, my $400 Trakker NM rear sight.

boosterboy
03-01-2007, 3:46 PM
buy a new one!:D

and wrap tape around your pliers this time around when you install the pins.

luvtolean
03-01-2007, 3:49 PM
Some scars add character, but assembly scars show poor mechanical aptitude.

Yeah, exactly.

It's like looking at a 1911 for the tattle tale. ;)

If I ever blow it and manage to scratch in the half moon, I'll refinish the gun to hide my stupidity. A few years and counting with the original finish though. ;)

James R.
03-01-2007, 3:54 PM
...I'll refinish the gun to hide my stupidity...

This is the sort of mantra I live by, it's expensive to be a perfectionist and you'll piss a lot of slobs off in the process when you reject their work as substandard.

Regards,

James R.

schizrade2
03-02-2007, 12:56 PM
You're not getting the point. It's something new and as such people tend to like them to look new. It's a shame to ding something up because you were sloppy with your tools or didn't use the correct tools. We've all done it, but I don't feed myself a line of BS that it's ok to do that cause it was going to happen anyways...that's a lazy slob like defeatist attitude. I for one would not be willing to pay new prices for a rifle at a gun store that was riddled with nicks and dings simply because I might ding it up in the future. IMHO It's equally illogical to accept a car riddled with nicks and dings simply because eventually you're going to ding it up in the normal course of use.

I don't spend a lot of time playing boy soldier so I don't roll around on the ground with my rifles and toss them into rocks and the like. They tend to stay in pretty good shape with only what I would consider normal handling wear. Were it a rifle being used in combat I would show it the level of respect required to keep it functional but not pamper it to my own detriment.

Most of us who shoot off the bench, standing or prone aren't going to be beating up our rifles. Anyhow if you don't mind nicks and dings more power to ya. I cringe when I bang up any of my guns...I don't care if it's a combat styled rifle or my O/U clays gun...I treat them all with respect and care.

Regards,

James R.

Uh huh. Ok. Boy Soldier. Right.

James R.
03-02-2007, 1:31 PM
Uh huh. Ok. Boy Soldier. Right.

Correct, I don't roll around on the ground and crawl on my belly with my rifles. I don't throw them at rocks or toss them over obsticles and pick them up on the other side i.e. I'm not playing boy soldier with them so they don't get banged up too badly.

I shoot from the bench, I'll shoot off the ground prone etc. I don't go out of my way to keep em pretty but I don't intentionally mistreat them either.

I certainly won't be caught taking emory paper to them to give them a high point wear look. No offense to the poster who did that, to each his own. Some people like that sort of thing, pre-ripped jeans or faux antique furniture etc. However I will not use, "it's gonna get banged up anyways" as a IMHO lame excuse for poor workmanship. If you're cool with it, cool...I still say it's a cop out.

DirtySanchez
03-02-2007, 1:41 PM
If its just gonna look pretty, they sell a much cheaper version at Toy's R Us, I'ts flourescent pink but it goes good with a petty coat and it won't chip your nails as much.

:D

:D :D :D

proraptor
03-02-2007, 2:21 PM
I agree with James R in full...I paid a ton of money building my AR....I want to keep it in as nice shape as possible...along with my other guns....Well maybe not my AK47 LOL

shark92651
03-02-2007, 2:54 PM
Whats the big deal when someone asks how to touch up a scratch on their rifle? I don't consider my $1600 rifle to be in the same category as a $10 hammer. Yes, they are both tools but I don't give a crap if there is a scratch on my hammer. A scratch on my rifle I will try to avoid and if I can spend a couple bucks on a paint pen or a sharpie to touch it up I will.

PIRATE14
03-02-2007, 3:06 PM
ALUMA BLACK.......works on my rifles....and I am sure it's already on a couple of yours..........:D

While, I tend to agree that these things are easy to ding and that silver color really pops out against the black........if you spend a little time taking the oil and grease off......

The Black touch up stuff will bring it back into looking like new so you can go an ding it up again.......

James R.
03-02-2007, 4:19 PM
I agree with James R in full...I paid a ton of money building my AR....I want to keep it in as nice shape as possible...along with my other guns....Well maybe not my AK47 LOL

If the SHTF I'd gladly rest the forend of my rifle on stucco and bricks and other things that'll leave nasty marks. When I'm at the range it rests in my hand or on bags or whatever...no sense beating something up for the sake of beating it up.

If I were taking a urban tactical rifle course I suppose I might accept it getting banged up as well, but in day to day plinking at the range use it makes no sense to beat the living *****e out of your rifles.

In any event, thanks for the support. I'm glad to see some folks care about their rifles as much as I do. You should see how much people baby their benchrest guns and rightly so with them costing $3000~4000 for a top flight setup sans scope.

Regards,

James R.

pc_city
03-03-2007, 6:43 PM
Apply lots of pink nail polish and put it back in the gunsafe.