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View Full Version : Long term emergency food purchase advice.


kemikalembalance
12-01-2011, 12:34 AM
Ive been looking for a while now into purchasing long term food for my family and I. Places like this:
http://www.foodinsurance.com/
http://preparewise.com/?gclid=CPW1hcS64KwCFUvCtgodhk5KpA

There are a ton of others, are their any opinions or experiences with the food or a certain compony? For me, making my own is not an option. I have two kids and my wife and i work 40 to 50 + hours a week each. Thank you for ya'lls imput.

thenodnarb
12-01-2011, 2:00 AM
If by "make your own" you mean grow it, then you're not alone. But if you mean "make your own" like put together bulk foods like wheat, rice, corn, powdered milk etc... then its not as hard as you think, and much cheaper.

Of course if you want the simplicity of somewhat prepared foods like canned goods and freeze dried meals, then I suggest mountain house. Preparewise would be my seconds choice. I think the mountain house in #10 cans is a good option and a good buy. Better IMO than individual packed meals. Taste is great, probably the best. You'll need LOTS of water since its all freeze dried stuff. But don't neglect the other stuff than you can get from places like honeyville. For instance, dried milk in #10 cans, dehydrated fruits, veggies, meat or TVP products, dried eggs, pudding, lemonade mix, seasonings, cooking oil, and plenty of salt and sugar. A well rounded food storage would also include wheat(which is sold pre-packaged by honeyville in buckets or package your own and save a little) for making bread, and for making sprouts for vitamins and fresh greens. Actually vitamins themselves would be a good thing to add, especially vitamin C and E. I would add a few of the packaged garden seeds sold at honeyville too just in case. They sell #10 cans of seeds that have a large variety of garden vegetables, beans etc..
If you are going to make bread, include yeast(they sell it by the pound for cheap). I also plan to store baking soda and powder as well.
Add to that canned goods, like beans, canned meat, stew, soup etc...
For a few grand you could probably get a years supply for a family of four with the above suggested mix of foods.
Good luck!

Cali-Shooter
12-01-2011, 2:07 AM
I've gotten this:

http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11622359

This:

http://www.overstock.com/Emergency-Preparedness/Chefs-Banquet-ARK-1-Month-Food-Storage-Supply/5701015/product.html?cid=123620

And several cases of Military MRE's.

The Costco emergency food isn't bad, although it consists of dry powder soup/stew mixes that you must boil several cups of water and add it into, and let it simmer for 25 mins before serving. It always helps as a food to supplement with bread, meat, vegetables, or rice, etc.

I also buy bulk bags of 50 lb rice from Costco, and I seal them away in ziplock bags in sealed containers as well.

wolff
12-01-2011, 4:23 AM
I've been looking at a Burkee water unit -- we'll need a purifier, not just a water filter http://www.berkeyfilters.com/index.html (NOTE: thanks to Kali law, they are awaiting "lead-free" status from the powers that be, so no-sell to CA today :(

I can't recall the name of this one site that sells dehydrated food in 6 mos., yr., etc. supplies right now, but their food is non-GMO, which is cool, plus they include sprout kits so you can start getting green stuff right away.

If you haven't already read up on the diff between freeze-dried and dehydrated food, now might be a good time to do so;)

Also, I can't say enough about Gamma Seals for 5 gal. buckets.... maybe a Group Buy?

Do not forget your pets! We put dry food in 5 gal. buckets. To preserve the doggie food, put a hunk of dry ice between layers of newspaper and lay it on top of the kibble with the lid ajar. Wait awhile, and if we;ve done it right, the heavy dioxide vapor settled down, displacing O2, and will preserve - or at least extend the shelf life.

We also buy and use typical dry items like rice, kraft deluxe mac/cheese, Top Ramen, powdered milk, evap milk, KNORR SWISS side dishes, etc.. that go into the shelf rotation just as we do with tuna fish, spagetti sauce, and most important of all...coffee! I try to buy an extra lb. a month - plus salt and herbs....... Oh, don't forget to buy extra tubes of Neo-sporin!!! God-forbid one day a 4 oz. tube being traded for a handful of silver coins.

My laptop is starting to lose key covers - what a royal pain, I'd sooner have my teeth cleaned!

problemchild
12-01-2011, 4:28 AM
Mountain house loaded with preservatives.
Cannot eat without water and heat.


Make a run to HoneyVille and buy some food. Even if you have to drive 400 miles its going to be cheaper if you want a years supply. HV has items in cans and buckets. HV food is cheaper and better quality. Much cheaper.

A video tour of HV (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m8Xq6KtmQZQ) Watch the video!

Price list from june (http://www.michaelkdickson.com/webjunk/Honeyville/June%20prices/Price%20List%202011-1olderofficeversions.xls)(DONT LOOK AT ONLINE PRICES, they are not the same as in store)

Short price list (http://www.michaelkdickson.com/webjunk/Honeyville/June%20prices/Copy%20of%20Short%20Price%20List%202011.xlsx)

Trust me its not that hard or time consuming to pour a 50lb bag of rice into a bucket and screw a lid on. Mylar helps and 02 eaters make it last longer.

1911Vince
12-01-2011, 5:21 AM
I live in a small house with 3 total in our family. I was thinking of storing food in the shed but it gets up to 90 degrees in there. Is mountain house still safe to to those temps? Any ideas of where else to store food?

problemchild
12-01-2011, 9:10 AM
I live in a small house with 3 total in our family. I was thinking of storing food in the shed but it gets up to 90 degrees in there. Is mountain house still safe to to those temps? Any ideas of where else to store food?

DONT store the food in a shed. The mice and bugs will eat through anything except armored steel to get to it. Ask me how I know.

If you insist on storing in a shed store the food in mylar bags in buckets and then place buckets in steel trash cans and tape lids with duct tape.

Heat is bad for any stored food and will cut the shelf life way down. Plan on rotating food (eating it).

You cant rotate mountain house food as it sucks to eat for main meals for the family. MH tastes like spackling paste to me.

thenodnarb
12-01-2011, 10:21 AM
DONT store the food in a shed. The mice and bugs will eat through anything except armored steel to get to it. Ask me how I know.

If you insist on storing in a shed store the food in mylar bags in buckets and then place buckets in steel trash cans and tape lids with duct tape.

Heat is bad for any stored food and will cut the shelf life way down. Plan on rotating food (eating it).

You cant rotate mountain house food as it sucks to eat for main meals for the family. MH tastes like spackling paste to me.

Let us know what you really think Problemchild!

I personally think it taste good. The wife and I have substituted a fast food meal in favor of a Mountain House meal before. Its the only brand I like to take backpacking. True that its not as good as fresh food, or home made food, but its better than most of the things I can cook and I also do the Honeyville bulk foods.

TheChief
12-01-2011, 11:11 AM
All foods are sensitive to heat and cold so shed storage is a definite no-no as PC said. You will significantly impact the life span to include with freeze dried foods. MREs will suffer up to a 70% degradation in 90 sustained degree heat.

I use Mountain House packets for camping and they taste ok out of the bag. I usually spice them up a bit with spices and and other dried add ons like mushrooms or veggies for a better flavor. But then again, I like MREs too so maybe my tastes are degenerate. So there ProbChild :)~

kemikalembalance
12-01-2011, 11:56 AM
Quotes from all the above posts, thank you. I live in the Antelope Vally. Our water is out almost instantly if there is an earth quake big enough. I figure if worst case, we get a 8.0 earth quake, it would be a minimum of one week before the first store is re-opened, two weeks before a decent amount of supplies come rollin in, and 4 to 6 weeks before the rioting of some form stops. I have two huskies, a 1 year old, a five year old, my self and my wife. There is about 15 more or so that will band together for resources n' such.

Personally, my goal is to have enough food to eat two to three a day, without stepping foot into a store for a minimum of two months. I believe that is a reasonable amount of time for shortages and riots to die down around here. The good part of where we live is between us and santa clarita, we would be the main supply rout from the north. But the bad part is the same.

I hate to ask this, but if I bought the food in a bucket, I just pop the lid and follow the instructions and yummy? You all gave some other products to buy as well and Im gonna look into those, but that is about the jist of it, right.

Last question...is there a medical supplier that I can buy from? Im in search and rescue for the local sheriff here, but our stuff comes from a down town supplier via the department.

REPR
12-01-2011, 12:02 PM
Quotes from all the above posts, thank you. I live in the Antelope Vally. Our water is out almost instantly if there is an earth quake big enough. I figure if worst case, we get a 8.0 earth quake, it would be a minimum of one week before the first store is re-opened, two weeks before a decent amount of supplies come rollin in, and 4 to 6 weeks before the rioting of some form stops. I have two huskies, a 1 year old, a five year old, my self and my wife. There is about 15 more or so that will band together for resources n' such.

Personally, my goal is to have enough food to eat two to three a day, without stepping foot into a store for a minimum of two months. I believe that is a reasonable amount of time for shortages and riots to die down around here. The good part of where we live is between us and santa clarita, we would be the main supply rout from the north. But the bad part is the same.

I hate to ask this, but if I bought the food in a bucket, I just pop the lid and follow the instructions and yummy? You all gave some other products to buy as well and Im gonna look into those, but that is about the jist of it, right.

Last question...is there a medical supplier that I can buy from? Im in search and rescue for the local sheriff here, but our stuff comes from a down town supplier via the department.

It's personal choice but I like http://www.chinookmed.com/ good service, selection, and they seem to have most of what I want when i order supplies.

jyo
12-01-2011, 12:44 PM
Well, since I am located in a big city, I don't believe that I or many others will be able to "Bug out" if things turn to shiit. Too many people, roads blocked, fuel unavailable etc. Therefore, I realize that in an "Event" the wife and I (+ dogs) will be bugging in. Also as I am entering my senior years, planning for the "End of the world" type event and then living off supplies and later the land just isn't going to happen. My planning is mostly toward surviving a major EQ, civil unrest or storm type of thing. As we have seen (Katrina), help will arrive, just not as fast as we would like it. My plan is pretty simple: have enough supplies to last for a period of time like say two or three months---this would include food, water, meds, clothing, cooking, protective guns and ammo, batteries, etc. I would like to provide enough for my little family and to be able to offer some limited help to those close by in return for them sharing as well. My food supplies don't have to be portable, freeze-dried, lightweight, etc. So I've gone the canned food route---stored in a cool dry place. Canned food seems to last almost forever, usually doesn't require adding water and can even be eaten cold if that's needed. Large stocks of Chili, soups, meats, beef stew, pasta, fruits, supplemented with a stash of dry rice and pasta is available especially when bought on sale. Bottled water and five gallon bottles (treated) plus some filtering devices will have to get us by. Don't forget dog supplies---they are family and have protective abilities. That's my plan...

xgi1991
12-01-2011, 1:00 PM
It's personal choice but I like http://www.chinookmed.com/ good service, selection, and they seem to have most of what I want when i order supplies.

+2 on Chinookmed, I get most of my stuff from them, they have some great pre-packaged kits, great customer service

TheChief
12-01-2011, 1:20 PM
Med Supplies
+1 for Chinookmed.com but I also use Amazon and Google if you know what you are looking for.

If you’re on the S&R Team you should get discounts from the suppliers...

Food
Think about what levels of activity you will be operating at for that two week period. Then think about calories, protein, and fat requirements to sustain that level and multiply by 1.5 as stress will have its effects too (hunger and or the runs). I plan for about 4KCals per day. If you are just sitting around then that is enough for 2.5 people and some hunger. However, to start out, go for at least 2Kcals per day for you and each member of your family.

If this is for Earthquake prep you have the additional burden of where to store it that can be reached if your house collapses.

Water
One gallon, per person, per day is the FEMA and general recommendation for drinking, cooking, and hygiene. Again, think about your activity levels and how much you will really need. If you’re in the Valley in July when things start to shake and you go about your rescue efforts you are going to need more than a gallon per day.

Cooking
The Freeze-Dried and Dehydrated foods generally require 8oz of boiling water per 1-2 servings to reconstitute it and make it enjoyable. While you don’t have to use boiling water, it will take longer to reconstitute and it won’t taste as good (you like your eggs, stew, or pasta cold and watery?)
If you plan to use boiling water, you need a stove and fuel or be willing to make campfires regularly.

Security
Day 1: So now you have all the food, water, cooking and medical supplies at your home and an Earthquake hits. You and your family survive and the house does not completely collapse. You go and start rescuing people. There are thousands of displaced people in the streets and somehow, thankfully no firestorm develops to make everyone evacuate.
Day 2: People are getting hungry and thirsty and are looking for food and water and are generally milling or wandering around looking through rubble
Day 3: People are getting desperate for water and food and may no longer be respecting property lines. Maybe they wonder if you have food because your house made it ok or they see you cooking in the back yard
Day 4-14: Looting? Gangs of hungry or thirsty people roaming?

While not the apocalypse, it is definitely a situation to give some thought and maybe some planning efforts towards.

For me, cooking would happen in the morning and evening when it's still dark so there was no smoke and in a room where the light would not be seen. Otherwise all food and water consumption is done out of site of strangers and especially neighbors that were not part of the prep group and had their own supplies.

Supplies are kept well hidden (buried?) and only one or two days worth of food and water are out at any one time in case your place is raided. Expect them to take everything and don’t fight off the big crowds, let them take it cause you have more ;).

Neighborhood Captain
During the day, your helping the injured, attempting to make or scavenge clean water from pools, toilet tanks, water heaters, etc (distillation), and scavenging food for the daily potlucks for your neighborhood/block.

My 2 cents

Good luck on your preps

Enjoy

sholling
12-01-2011, 1:33 PM
I've gotten this:

http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11622359

Keep in mind that this 275 "serving" claim is a bit of marketing hype. The serving size they refer to is 70-170 calories. They really should call it a 30 day supply of vegetarian food for one person or a one week supply for a family of 4. At that price they are still a good idea and I keep a couple of them and the Ark (http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11649759&whse=BC&Ne=4000000&eCat=BC|3605|75277|90741&N=4047923&Mo=50&pos=0&No=24&Nr=P_CatalogName:BC&cat=90741&Ns=P_Price|1||P_SignDesc1&lang=en-US&Sp=C&ec=BC-EC39718-Cat75277&topnav=) around.

If you have a family I'd keep 1-2 of these for their portability in the family car plus make a trip to HoneyVille.

problemchild
12-01-2011, 2:17 PM
Quotes from all the above posts, thank you. I live in the Antelope Vally. Our water is out almost instantly if there is an earth quake big enough. I figure if worst case, we get a 8.0 earth quake, it would be a minimum of one week before the first store is re-opened, two weeks before a decent amount of supplies come rollin in, and 4 to 6 weeks before the rioting of some form stops. I have two huskies, a 1 year old, a five year old, my self and my wife. There is about 15 more or so that will band together for resources n' such.

Personally, my goal is to have enough food to eat two to three a day, without stepping foot into a store for a minimum of two months. I believe that is a reasonable amount of time for shortages and riots to die down around here. The good part of where we live is between us and santa clarita, we would be the main supply rout from the north. But the bad part is the same.

I hate to ask this, but if I bought the food in a bucket, I just pop the lid and follow the instructions and yummy? You all gave some other products to buy as well and Im gonna look into those, but that is about the jist of it, right.

Last question...is there a medical supplier that I can buy from? Im in search and rescue for the local sheriff here, but our stuff comes from a down town supplier via the department.

"I hate to ask this, but if I bought the food in a bucket, I just pop the lid and follow the instructions and yummy"

Regarding the stored food. I have posted a ton of recipes and reviews on the HV stored food. You could also buy a home storage cookbook.

If I were you I would combine what people have said here. Lots of good advice. Sorry but Im not a big fan of Mountainhouse as I ate tons of it on camping trips and got sick of the taste.

If you combine 1/2 canned food from the grocery store and 1/2 dried food from Honeyville. You could cycle through the canned food once per year and keep the dried food stored for years.

Buy 2 50lb bags of rice and store it in mylar and buckets
1 50lb bag of flour and mylar bag it with o2 eaters (shelf life 5 years in mylar)
2- 25lb bags of 16 bean mix and mylar bag and bucket.
6 cans powdered eggs
1 50lb bags dried hash browns
1 25lb bag pancake mix
6 cans powdered milk
1 20lb box macaroni elbows
3 cans powdered cheese mix or generic white sauce mix
6 cans dried veggies
6 cans dried fruit
6 bags brownie mix
6 cans fruit drink mix
6 cans dried meat or TVP
1 50lb bag white sugar
4 bricks yeast
12 buckets
12 gamma lida
12 mylar bags
1 bag o2 eaters
1 case qt sized ball jars and lids
1 bag 25lbs quick oats
1 25lb bag brown sugar
1 20lb box spaghetti
3 cans powder spaghetti sauce
1 25lb bag salt
1 25lb bag popcorn

That should get you started.

Lupo
12-01-2011, 3:18 PM
tagged for later

Salty
12-01-2011, 3:43 PM
Keep in mind that this 275 "serving" claim is a bit of marketing hype. The serving size they refer to is 70-170 calories. They really should call it a 30 day supply of vegetarian food for one person or a one week supply for a family of 4. At that price they are still a good idea and I keep a couple of them and the Ark (http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11649759&whse=BC&Ne=4000000&eCat=BC|3605|75277|90741&N=4047923&Mo=50&pos=0&No=24&Nr=P_CatalogName:BC&cat=90741&Ns=P_Price|1||P_SignDesc1&lang=en-US&Sp=C&ec=BC-EC39718-Cat75277&topnav=) around.

If you have a family I'd keep 1-2 of these for their portability in the family car plus make a trip to HoneyVille.

Two of those would take up my whole trunk! :p

njineermike
12-01-2011, 4:02 PM
I try to keep a 1 year supply of available long-term food, along with 2 extra propane tanks for cooking. Good for short term. For long-term zombie-apocolypse/civil unrest type situations, all bets are off anyway. Several of the forums I participate in have the same threads going now, of long-term food supplies, ammo storage, water purification. In a pinch, it's a lack of water that will kill you, not lack of food. I still keep food anyway. :)

I work in the water treatment industry, and here's how to purify water in an emergency: Take a 50 Gallon garbage can, punch a hole in the bottom for a garden hose, line the bottom with a piece of screen from a screen door, fill the bottom to about 1 foot thick with rough gravel, another piece of door screen material, then fill it with alternating layers of sandblasting (pure silica) sand (because it's "clean") and charcoal. DO NOT use commercial BBQ charcoal as it is usually impregnated with chemicals to allow it to ignite, which are either toxic or will leave a disagreeable flavor in the water. Only use commercially available charcoal if it is listed as ONLY charcoal or "natural charcoal". Place another piece of door screen on top of the uppermost layer, then attach the lid. The lid should have a hole in the top for a hose if you have a pump rigged up, or a larger hole to pour the water through. This is a small scale version of what water treatment plants use for filtration of water. The gravel on the bottom is to allow the water to have a path to leave the barrel without the sand and charcoal clogging the outlet and stopping water flow.

BOIL all the water you intend on running through the filter if possible, before and after filtration. If not, use bleach to disinfect it prior to and after filtration. Bleach can be manufactured by taking a brine solution and running DC power through it. The H2O + NaCl are broken down to NaClO (Sodium Hypochlorite) and Hydrogen is produced as an offgas. You can attempt to re-use the hydrogen as a heat source if you want. When using bleach, it will only use what is demanded by the disinfection process, the rest will suspend in the water. You can solarize the water in a shallow receptacle (like a kiddie pool) to allow the bleach to evaporate. In a day or so, you have clean water pretty much like what comes out of your tap. May or may not taste like tap water, but it beats drinking your own urine.

If you place the barrel on a stand a few feet above ground, gravity will allow the water to flow down through the filter and out the hose to whatever receptacle you can use for storage. You can get the electricity for the bleach by taking a few old car alternators, rigging up a windmill out of a fan or hook it to a bicycle and setting up a few car batteries to hold the charge. With the proper gearing, a car alternator will output 20 or more amps, which is plenty to charge a battery bank.

Several people I know have 1000 gallon buffer tanks attached directly to the house plumbing, which is constantly refreshed. If anything ever happens, they have 1000 gallons of fresh potable water on hand at the time.

And speaking of drinking urine, You can further utilize your resources by placing a large plastic tarp on the ground above a hole. Pour all urine (urine ONLY) into the hole. Have a rod in the center of the tarp and a collector at each corner. The water will evaporate out of the urine and collect on the tarp, dripping down to the collection recptacles. Once again, not the most appetizing, but it beats being dead. You other option is to build a still, but now your talking about a lot more time and effort. If your trying to lay low, a plastic tarp is easy to hide, a still is not.

Branden967
12-01-2011, 4:13 PM
Tagged for later.

kemikalembalance
12-01-2011, 4:33 PM
Recommended books?

And im hoping that if anything does happen, it is an earthquake or something similar.
Zombies and korean invaders is good bear talk and fun on some of the posts, but as stated above...not realistic. But the longer it takes for the National guard and Law Enforcement to get here, the more likely the "zombies will come out looking for food.

If someone chimes in that works for a city or state that has trained for this, what kinda time are we looking for a text book response to an 8.0?

I know with budgets and sheer incompetence, our cities have not got with the sheriff and fire to work out any plans. And we are gonna be invaded by government agencies during the relief efforts. Due to our geography, we would be less likely to be displaced by a event of that magnitude.

VictorFranko
12-01-2011, 4:33 PM
OP, you already know WATER is going to be your biggest problem.
Rice, freeze dried foods not so good for SoCal.
Besides my water supply, I buy and rotate canned vegetables such as Whole New Potatoes, Carrots etc. You can eat right from the can, and each can contains considerable amounts of drinkable water.
With a Von's or Ralph's card, you can buy 10 cans for $10. If you don't rotate though it, it's not too expensive to throw away.
Think water first.
There are lots of other inexpensive canned items that you can buy today with a use by date 3+ years away such as tuna, salmon and canned soups.

LoooongGun
12-01-2011, 5:24 PM
It's just that it isn't flowing out of the tap as you are accustomed to. If you had an electric (or other,as appropriate) pump, you could pull all the water you needed right out of the water-main, through a spigot in your house. Normal "boil first" admonitions apply. If real SHTF conditions do happen, it will be a LONG time before the water-main gets fixed. If your storage shed will let you, excavate the floor area down about 2 or 3 feet and get to a cooler area. I think I've heard that 3 feet down will approach 55° to 56°. Put a false floor over it and keep it closed up.

pkbirdog
12-01-2011, 8:37 PM
"I hate to ask this, but if I bought the food in a bucket, I just pop the lid and follow the instructions and yummy"

Regarding the stored food. I have posted a ton of recipes and reviews on the HV stored food. You could also buy a home storage cookbook.

If I were you I would combine what people have said here. Lots of good advice. Sorry but Im not a big fan of Mountainhouse as I ate tons of it on camping trips and got sick of the taste.

If you combine 1/2 canned food from the grocery store and 1/2 dried food from Honeyville. You could cycle through the canned food once per year and keep the dried food stored for years.

Buy 2 50lb bags of rice and store it in mylar and buckets
1 50lb bag of flour and mylar bag it with o2 eaters (shelf life 5 years in mylar)
2- 25lb bags of 16 bean mix and mylar bag and bucket.
6 cans powdered eggs
1 50lb bags dried hash browns
1 25lb bag pancake mix
6 cans powdered milk
1 20lb box macaroni elbows
3 cans powdered cheese mix or generic white sauce mix
6 cans dried veggies
6 cans dried fruit
6 bags brownie mix
6 cans fruit drink mix
6 cans dried meat or TVP
1 50lb bag white sugar
4 bricks yeast
12 buckets
12 gamma lida
12 mylar bags
1 bag o2 eaters
1 case qt sized ball jars and lids
1 bag 25lbs quick oats
1 25lb bag brown sugar
1 20lb box spaghetti
3 cans powder spaghetti sauce
1 25lb bag salt
1 25lb bag popcorn

That should get you started.

Its funny this thread came up because the wife and I have just started talking about stocking up on food and water for emergencies. I checked out the HV website and it seems I can get some of what you listed. I have 3 kids, 2 of them have severe peanut allergies and a lot of their product we cant use cause it contains or was processed on machines that processes peanuts. In your opinion, how long will this last for a family of 5 and where did you post the recipies and reviews?

njineermike
12-01-2011, 8:51 PM
It's just that it isn't flowing out of the tap as you are accustomed to. If you had an electric (or other,as appropriate) pump, you could pull all the water you needed right out of the water-main, through a spigot in your house. Normal "boil first" admonitions apply. If real SHTF conditions do happen, it will be a LONG time before the water-main gets fixed. If your storage shed will let you, excavate the floor area down about 2 or 3 feet and get to a cooler area. I think I've heard that 3 feet down will approach 55° to 56°. Put a false floor over it and keep it closed up.

As long as there isn't a break at a lower elevation that you are currently at, you can pump out of the water main, but you also have to consider that if there is a suction break or air gap, your stuck again.

wilit
12-01-2011, 9:01 PM
I ordered my food and water supplies from www.longlifefood.com.

I ordered the 72 hour for 4 MRE kit and the 96 pack of USCG approved water packets. The water is a good starter, but I have a Katadyn water filter in our kit too.

thenodnarb
12-01-2011, 11:09 PM
1 50lb bags dried hash browns

1 20lb box spaghetti
3 cans powder spaghetti sauce



What is your source on these items because I don't remember seeing them at honeyville and they aren't on the website.

Allentu
12-02-2011, 3:41 AM
If you like the taste of cardboard and preservatives that by all means get the MRE and mountain house type of food but if you want better tasting food, get simple "just add water" type of foods and you'll be good

problemchild
12-02-2011, 4:04 AM
What is your source on these items because I don't remember seeing them at honeyville and they aren't on the website.

price list (http://www.michaelkdickson.com/webjunk/Honeyville/June%20prices/Price%20List%202011-1olderofficeversions.xls)

problemchild
12-02-2011, 6:34 AM
Its funny this thread came up because the wife and I have just started talking about stocking up on food and water for emergencies. I checked out the HV website and it seems I can get some of what you listed. I have 3 kids, 2 of them have severe peanut allergies and a lot of their product we cant use cause it contains or was processed on machines that processes peanuts. In your opinion, how long will this last for a family of 5 and where did you post the recipies and reviews?

There is a cure for peanut allergies.

http://www.jimmunol.org/content/early/2011/10/04/jimmunol.1100608.abstract?sid=df3a31a8-3dff-4b36-b94b-ed53047e3cdd

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763_162-20119217-10391704.html

AMDG
12-02-2011, 12:47 PM
Several people I know have 1000 gallon buffer tanks attached directly to the house plumbing, which is constantly refreshed. If anything ever happens, they have 1000 gallons of fresh potable water on hand at the time.

Excellent. Please elaborate!

njineermike
12-02-2011, 1:17 PM
Excellent. Please elaborate!

Nothing more complicated than a 1000 gallon double-walled tank with an inny, a backflow preventer, and an outie. House water inlet is piped into the system on top, then right out on the bottom into the rest of the house. Some of the more elaborate setups have an air bladder with an exterior air coupler for pressurization so the water pressure could be maintained when the main lost pressure.

LoooongGun
12-02-2011, 1:32 PM
or any other kind of air-tight storage receptacle. Simply plumb the sealed tank(s) into your pressurized water supply ahead of the water-heater, and let all the tanks fill up. A bleed-valve may help. If the tanks are indoors there are plus and minus factors: + is that the water will be at room temp before your heater begins to heat it. Minus is that you'll need a good foundation under the tank(s) to keep them standing; a forty gal tank will weigh in at over 300 pounds, plus the tank and plumbing.

Excellent. Please elaborate!

LoooongGun
12-02-2011, 1:34 PM
1,000 gallons = four TONS of water, if I did it right.
Nothing more complicated than a 1000 gallon double-walled tank with an inny, a backflow preventer, and an outie. House water inlet is piped into the system on top, then right out on the bottom into the rest of the house. Some of the more elaborate setups have an air bladder with an exterior air coupler for pressurization so the water pressure could be maintained when the main lost pressure.

njineermike
12-02-2011, 1:38 PM
1,000 gallons = four TONS of water, if I did it right.

Close enough. That's why they are mounted at ground level.

GrizzlyGuy
12-02-2011, 1:53 PM
These days I do most of my ordering from Emergency Essentials. You can buy prepared food in #10 cans (http://beprepared.com/quickshoplist.asp_Q_c_E_950_A_name_E_Freeze%20Drie d%20Foods%20In%20#10%20Cans) or superpails of stuff (http://beprepared.com/quickshoplist.asp_Q_c_E_79_A_name_E_Superpails) like rice, beans, etc. I have a mixture of both. Freeze dried food usually has a longer shelf life than dehydrated food, and is the way to go for easy long-term storage (shelf lives of 20-30 years).

I love Mountain House food, it is super-easy to prepare (add hot water, stir, wait) and the preservatives don't bother me at all. They spice things up perfectly as well, the meals aren't bland like some of the competitors. Mountain House food is a little pricey but it is the real deal - backpackers and mountaineers have been eating it for years.

raycn
12-02-2011, 5:20 PM
I buy most of my food items from emergency essentials, www.beprepared.com

Some of their "other" items are junk but service is great and they carry Mountain House.

DeanW66
12-04-2011, 2:15 PM
1,000 gallons = four TONS of water, if I did it right.

actually more; 4.17 tons :p (yes you did it right).

Got Stuff?
12-04-2011, 4:30 PM
Recommended books?

And im hoping that if anything does happen, it is an earthquake or something similar.
Zombies and korean invaders is good bear talk and fun on some of the posts, but as stated above...not realistic. But the longer it takes for the National guard and Law Enforcement to get here, the more likely the "zombies will come out looking for food.

If someone chimes in that works for a city or state that has trained for this, what kinda time are we looking for a text book response to an 8.0?

I know with budgets and sheer incompetence, our cities have not got with the sheriff and fire to work out any plans. And we are gonna be invaded by government agencies during the relief efforts. Due to our geography, we would be less likely to be displaced by a event of that magnitude.



Cookin' with home storage (Vicki Tate) is a pretty good book.

As far as .gov response times to disasters goes. Your best bet is to place all bets on getting NO help at all. All agencies will be extremely overwhelmed very quickly. Help will eventually come but depending on the severity of the event.......it could be at least a few days to a week.