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View Full Version : 4 season tent recomendations/ sleeping bag for backpacking


dezertracer18
11-23-2011, 4:19 PM
Basically started building my backpack this last week but am unsure of which tent i should buy. Id prefer it to be around a 2-3 person tent and also preferably a 4 season tent as intend to use it in the snow/rain at the weathers worst. Also was curious as too what kinda sleeping bag i should get im leaning towards REI down filled +0 but was curious if any one had any feedback or other recomendations Thanks any help is appreciated.

damon1272
11-23-2011, 4:25 PM
Big thing is if you will be car camping or just back packing. For car camping I went with an 8 person 4 season cabelas alaskan guide tent. Big and heavy but built very nicely.

dezertracer18
11-23-2011, 4:27 PM
im basically dedicating this tent as my backpack only tent

problemchild
11-23-2011, 4:48 PM
I spent 9 years camping in the snow shooting pictures. If you want to talk pm me and we can talk on the phone. If you want to buy once buy the right gear one time and be done. You might need a couple bags to spread the heat range out. I have bags from -40f-+20f

Decisions:

Single wall= Lighter, doesnt flap in wind against each wall, expensive, walls get wet in rain
Double wall= heavier, cheaper, flaps in wind, helps control moisture in rain

Bags:

Synthetic= usually more water resistant, works when wet, washable, more of a heat range

Down= really not washable and back to same loft, narrower heat range, warmer in my opinion but narrow range window, not good when wet, expensive

http://www.michaelkdickson.com/webjunk/Sierras%202010%20May%20/photos/DPP_0248.JPG

http://www.michaelkdickson.com/webjunk/Yosemite%20Christmas%202010/photos/IMG_1864.jpg

http://www.michaelkdickson.com/webjunk/camping/flood1.jpg

mls343
11-23-2011, 4:53 PM
For me, I've had some pretty good luck with the Kelty Half Dome 4 - even in the rain and snow. For bad weather, I bring 2 extra pieces of plastic - one for the inside of the tent on the bottom (not under the tent as it collects water) and one between the rain fly and the tent. So far, and I've been in some good snow and downpours, it's been good to go.

As far as a bag goes, my choice is with the synthetic and get it rated to zero. Down bags are nice and comfy when the weather is good, but once you get them wet, it's better to have the synthetic.

Just my $0.02

thenodnarb
11-23-2011, 4:59 PM
IMO don't get a 4 season tent. They're heavy, they generally don't breathe well which means condensation(which can be lethal in certain situations) which means wet sleeping bags and gear.

You don't really need a 4 season tent. 3 season is OK even for snow with the fly and staked well. Basically anywhere in california, you're probably not going to need a 4 season. The only time you'd need one is when you expect a foot or more of snow without you being there(or being asleep) to make sure it melts off or is knocked off. Now i realize that that is possible for a foot of snow in california and I've spent nearly all my life living in those areas where that is common, but if you are in a survival situation and you need to bug out, you should probably stick with the vehicle, or build another structure over the tent for heavy snow loads.

Now if this is for general backpacking or camping, a 3 season tent will cover you 99% of the time and you only bring the 4 season tent when you intend to camp in the snow. You generally don't want to go backpacking with tent that weighs 10-14lbs so it only comes along in severe weather. My 3 season tent only weights like 4 lbs with the fly and stakes and I feel comfortable with that tent in all scenarios.

Regarding bags: I have a couple synthetic and they are great but they are bulky(which is their only downside). I'll hopefully be getting a down soon for backpacking. The synthetic bags take up my WHOLE pack practically so I have to carry it on the outside of the pack which is pretty annoying and makes it susceptible to getting wet(which is no fun even with a synthetic bag). A down bag can be compressed to the size of a coke bottle and can easily be carried in a dry bag which will keep it dry. Then the only threat to the down bag is condensation if you are careful, so make sure your tent breathes well.

Regarding temperature, a zero degree bag doesn't mean you are nice and comfy at 0 degrees. It keeps you alive at that temp. Get a low temperature bag and if you get hot you can unzip it. -20 would be a good choice. Not exactly a summer bag but like I said, you can unzip it.

dezertracer18
11-23-2011, 5:26 PM
Thanks for all the quick replys i appreciate it.

First things first all i have to say is damn am jealous of those snow pics of your tents problemchild...I would kill to be able too camp/hike like that. I am just starting out so I am grateful for any info and help i can get. I basically am wanting to start getting me and a couple of my buddys to start backpacking together but the amount of gear that is required is insane... so bare with me on the newb questions i may ask. Also i will definately shoot you a pm friday and if you dont mind kinda breaking down any info you can on purchasing the right tent and bag.
Also problemchild i will definately send you a pm friday and the more info i can learn the better. Im used to camping in the dezert for races like barstow and lucerne but this whole backpacking in and still keeping warm seems to be much more complicated or atleast it seems that way too me.

Anyways thanks for the info and keep it coming



[QUOTE=problemchild;7552323]I spent 9 years camping in the snow shooting pictures. If you want to talk pm me and we can talk on the phone. If you want to buy once buy the right gear one time and be done. You might need a couple bags to spread the heat range out. I have bags from -40f-+20f

Decisions:

Single wall= Lighter, doesnt flap in wind against each wall, expensive, walls get wet in rain
Double wall= heavier, cheaper, flaps in wind, helps control moisture in rain

Bags:

Synthetic= usually more water resistant, works when wet, washable, more of a heat range

Down= really not washable and back to same loft, narrower heat range, warmer in my opinion but narrow range window, not good when wet, expensive

cabinetguy
11-23-2011, 8:08 PM
ive had good luck with rei's brand 4 season

echo1
11-23-2011, 8:51 PM
Some good advice here. I've got a ton of gear gathered up over a few decades of backpacking. Forget the true 4 season for now if you're just gearing up, but like PC says, get good gear. It'll last a long while if you take care of it. What ever tent you end up with, buy or make (should be slightly smaller)a footprint, it'll save your floor. PAX

asheron2
11-23-2011, 9:20 PM
ive had good luck with rei's brand 4 season

These appear o be good tents.

A note on single wall tents, they are probably not the best for here in california because of our wet snow and temps that keep the snow on the wetter side.

http://i453.photobucket.com/albums/qq257/asheron2/DSCN1859.jpg
http://i453.photobucket.com/albums/qq257/asheron2/untitled.jpg

kemasa
11-24-2011, 8:59 AM
If you have the money, you might want to take a look at Stephenson (www.warmlite.com). Large, lightweight and work in both warm and cold environments (if you get the side windows). The sleeping bags are also nice, but you need to get used to a VB bag, but it can save water and it also keep the insulation clean.