PDA

View Full Version : AR brass catcher?


PanzerAce
02-25-2007, 3:38 PM
Who here uses a brass catcher to save the brass that they want to reload? I plan on getting into reloading eventually, and so would like to save my cases. I have seen both hard cases that clamp onto the rifle, as well as soft cases that velcro on. Has anybody here used either one, or do most people just pickup the cases from wherever they eject to?

Thanks for the help :o

markymark
02-25-2007, 3:43 PM
I used a soft brass catcher the last time I shot my AR. Most of them would fall into the bag but a few would just get held up next to the ejection port.

ocabj
02-25-2007, 3:44 PM
I just use a net hanging down from the ceiling (overhead cover) on the firing line when at my home range.

During a match, I just keep my range cart next to my ejection port. Sometimes, my brass will eject right into my shooting stool.

Blue
02-25-2007, 5:24 PM
I've got one that hooks onto an A2 upper. I used it a couple of times a couple of years ago, but with a top loading rifle (Fab10) it was too much of a hassle. If you've gone gripless, it'd probably work fine.

PanzerAce
02-25-2007, 6:06 PM
I've got one that hooks onto an A2 upper. I used it a couple of times a couple of years ago, but with a top loading rifle (Fab10) it was too much of a hassle. If you've gone gripless, it'd probably work fine.

I assume you mean one of the hard plastic kinds? I am starting to lean toward that method, unless someone has had bad experiences with them (and yes, I am going gripless)

Technical Ted
02-25-2007, 6:38 PM
I've used several types that attach to the AR: One made of plastic and mesh that clipped into the fixed carry handle; the second made of plastic and mesh that clipped onto the rail the third, and current, made of nylon with an internal wire support. that attaches with a velcro strap that wraps around the handguard.

The first is OK if you have a fixed carry handle.

The second is OK if you're not running any optics.

The third type works best if you have optics mounted on your receiver rail. However, the more cases that it catches, the heavier it the bag gets and it tends to droop and cases wind up flying through the gap. If you're shooting with 10 rd mags, it won't be much of a problem if you empty the bag every couple of mags.

Another problem is that sometimes ejected cases get bounced back into the open ejection port and causing jams.

Fortunately I only use it when I'm at a range that doesn't offer brass nets or dividers between shooting stations.

PanzerAce
02-25-2007, 7:50 PM
I've used several types that attach to the AR: One made of plastic and mesh that clipped into the fixed carry handle; the second made of plastic and mesh that clipped onto the rail the third, and current, made of nylon with an internal wire support. that attaches with a velcro strap that wraps around the handguard.

The first is OK if you have a fixed carry handle.

The second is OK if you're not running any optics.

The third type works best if you have optics mounted on your receiver rail. However, the more cases that it catches, the heavier it the bag gets and it tends to droop and cases wind up flying through the gap. If you're shooting with 10 rd mags, it won't be much of a problem if you empty the bag every couple of mags.

Another problem is that sometimes ejected cases get bounced back into the open ejection port and causing jams.

Fortunately I only use it when I'm at a range that doesn't offer brass nets or dividers between shooting stations.

How about if you are running with a detach carry handle? Would you say go with the one that was designed for a fixed carry handle?

Technical Ted
02-25-2007, 8:11 PM
How about if you are running with a detach carry handle? Would you say go with the one that was designed for a fixed carry handle?
Not sure if they're designed to work with detachable carry handles: the opening is not as high as that of a fixed carry handle.

I've seen 'external" brass catchers consisting of a frame made from PVC pipe, a few tee, elbow fittings, end caps and some screen or garden cloth zip tied to the frame. You set them up next to you and the brass stays near you.