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ExAcHog
11-14-2011, 2:32 PM
Today I found a great deal on 100 lbs of salt. I bought 4- 25lb bags for a total of 14.69 out the door.

First time I have ever seen bulk salt (that is NOT IODIZED) for sale at Costco.

Now....Should I just put it in a sealed 6 gal bucket, or should I go the whole way and seal it in mylar first with o2 obsorbers???

Thoughts???

thenodnarb
11-14-2011, 2:53 PM
mylar and o2 is unnecessary for salt and sugar. Just put it in a sealed 5 gallon bucket to keep moisture out. You'll need 2 buckets.

Edit: By sealed I mean the ones with the O ring.

P.S. that's a good price even for salt. I think I spent $15 per 50lbs of sea salt.

Librarian
11-14-2011, 3:08 PM
First time I have ever seen bulk salt (that is NOT IODIZED) for sale at Costco.

Why the emphasis on 'not iodized'? Iodine deficiency (http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/goiter/DS00217) can be a serious (http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/food-facts/question367.htm) problem (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iodised_salt) - that was the original impetus to add iodine to salt.

wjc
11-14-2011, 3:10 PM
Why the emphasis on 'not iodized'? Iodine deficiency (http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/goiter/DS00217) can be a serious (http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/food-facts/question367.htm) problem (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iodised_salt) - that was the original impetus to add iodine to salt.

Salt is also used for preserving game and mounting hunting trophies. Iodine is not needed in that instance. Iodine is added to salt to prevent thyroid disease and goiters.

colddeadhands
11-14-2011, 3:12 PM
Salt is also used for preserving game and mounting hunting trophies. Iodine is not needed in that instance. Iodine is added to salt to prevent thyroid disease and goiters.

Does the iodine make the salt less usefull in those applications?

wjc
11-14-2011, 3:17 PM
Does the iodine make the salt less usefull in those applications?

Dunno...I never researched it. I use salt for preserving turkey fans and the instructions I got listed "non-iodized salt". There might be a reason like the iodine will taint the meat or something.

thenodnarb
11-14-2011, 3:34 PM
They also add fluoride to water to prevent tooth decay which leads to fluoridation(too much fluoride). I don't know much about iodized salt, but I try and stay away from stuff that is artificially added to things.

ExAcHog
11-14-2011, 4:46 PM
From what I have read, you want the non-iodized if you are salt-curing meat. Beyond that, I think the iodized is good for just about everything else.

ExAcHog
11-14-2011, 4:49 PM
mylar and o2 is unnecessary for salt and sugar. Just put it in a sealed 5 gallon bucket to keep moisture out. You'll need 2 buckets.

Edit: By sealed I mean the ones with the O ring.

P.S. that's a good price even for salt. I think I spent $15 per 50lbs of sea salt.

I did use O2 absorbers for the sugar I stored as it seems more susceptable to clumping, I didnt put it in mylar though.

Eljay
11-14-2011, 7:42 PM
Does the iodine make the salt less usefull in those applications?

If you're doing something with salt where you're packing it on and then washing it off or let it run off while cooking the iodine can absorb into the meat even though you're getting rid of most of the salt. It can be bitter in quantity and is kind of bad news taste-wise.

Scout2Diesel
11-14-2011, 7:45 PM
I wonder if iodized salt is prevalent in commercial recipes?

No gourmet would be caught using it!

thenodnarb
11-14-2011, 7:58 PM
I did use O2 absorbers for the sugar I stored as it seems more susceptable to clumping, I didnt put it in mylar though.

I've heard that O2 absorbers cause clumping/solidification. Don't know how true that is. I've only stored my sugar for about 6 months in a sealed bucket but it is still perfect. I get into it every so often when cooking.

SamIAm
11-14-2011, 8:03 PM
Google it.

seanbo
11-14-2011, 10:21 PM
You don't want iodized salt if you are using it for tanning a hyde.

Turo
11-14-2011, 10:28 PM
If you're doing something with salt where you're packing it on and then washing it off or let it run off while cooking the iodine can absorb into the meat even though you're getting rid of most of the salt. It can be bitter in quantity and is kind of bad news taste-wise.

This. Iodized salt tastes terrible. Kosher or sea salt ftw.

BigFatGuy
11-14-2011, 10:55 PM
Goiters bad. Iodized salt good. Google it.

unless you like your food to taste good. Or, like me, you have an allergy to iodine.

MudCamper
11-15-2011, 8:35 AM
Food fortification (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_fortification) is one of those very helpful things that governments have mandated that all the government-hating-tinfoil-hat-wearing folks around here probably hate just out of distrust of government. For example, vitamin D enriched milk and/or cereal has genuinely helped millions of American children over the decades. Not everything that our government does is bad.

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ExAcHog
11-15-2011, 9:49 AM
I think the "govt hating, tin foil hat" thing is a stretch here....No one doubts that fortified milk is a good thing.
It is simply fact that Iodine has a odd taste to most folks (hence the fact that serious Chefs avoid the stuff) AND...You want non-iodized for tanning, curing, preserving things in a SHTF scenario, the reason it is in this forum.

rp55
11-15-2011, 10:11 AM
You should have some Potassium Iodide tablets in your emergency kit in case of nuclear events. It is the same stuff they spray on table salt to iodize it. Get your iodine that way.

ireload
11-15-2011, 1:53 PM
I'll have to check out my local Costco. That's a damn good price! Salt back in the days was used for currency in other countries. It will be a good bartering item during times of need.

77bawls
11-15-2011, 6:58 PM
I'll have to check out my local Costco. That's a damn good price! Salt back in the days was used for currency in other countries. It will be a good bartering item during times of need.

That's where a man worth his salt came from.