PDA

View Full Version : Propane > battery


Esquire
11-12-2011, 11:07 PM
I'm really sold on propane lamps. A cylinder cost like $3 at Walmart, and these things last A LONG TIME, even at a high power setting. I use Coleman lamps and they are under $30. With a carrying case, they're a cinch to transport safely. And they are more environmentally friendly than batteries, right? When I light up two of these guys, I tell you - it's BRIGHT, great for camping/night shooting. Hank from the King of the Hill was right about propane. :D

ireload
11-13-2011, 12:48 AM
Another plus side you can fill up the disposable propane bottles from a 20lb tank with a adaptor.

VegasND
11-13-2011, 6:14 AM
I've always preferred propane over batteries. Get an adapter with hose to run them off a larger bottle. You can even run multiple devices off one large bottle.

Cheap Shot
11-13-2011, 7:20 AM
My camping equipment is 'dual fuel'. I have one stove of propane and one of white gas and one lamp of propane and one lamp of white gas. I prefer the white gas versions as it is easier to tell how much fuel is left.

Rhythm of Life
11-13-2011, 7:41 AM
My camping equipment is 'dual fuel'. I have one stove of propane and one of white gas and one lamp of propane and one lamp of white gas. I prefer the white gas versions as it is easier to tell how much fuel is left.

Buy once cry once.


My stove will run on 6 different fuels. From white gas to diesel to jet fuel.

Darklyte27
11-13-2011, 5:43 PM
an outdoors man knows that.
last I saw costco has a 20lb tank with gauge for about 20$

the 1 lb tanks are about 3$ or so
I also have a coleman propane lantern they are great.

kemasa
11-14-2011, 10:43 AM
The Costco tanks are around $27, at least in my area.

You can get a distribution post, which allows you to put the lantern at the top, plus you can get hoses to attach multiple items to the same tank. It is much cheaper to refill the 20lb tank than to buy the smaller tanks. Also, it is illegal to transport a refilled 1lb tank. One nice thing with the distribution post and hoses is that you can shut off the tank, turn the lantern on low, then after quite a bit of time the lantern will go out. If it is low enough, it can be 15 minutes or more. Nice just before you go to bed for the night.

It is a good idea to always turn off the tank when you are done since if there is a leak, then you will be out of propane. It is also a good idea to carry a couple of the small tanks as a backup as well.

problemchild
11-14-2011, 11:41 AM
NG is cheaper than propane. If you could fill the big tank from the house and then fill the small bottles you would have a winner.

Found this on another site.

"In order to figure out the cost of propane verses natural gas, I did the following:

I first needed to determine an appropriate conversion between gallons of propane and therms of natural gas. I found a website that listed a rough approximation between therms and gallons of propane:
100 cubic feet (1 CCF) of natural gas is very nearly 1 therm (0.95 1.05, typically, depending on gas analysis). 1 gallon of LPG is about 0.91 therm. (91000 BTU).
After determining that 1 gallon of Propane = 0.91 therms, I calculated how much one therm equals by doing the by dividing 1 gallon of propane by 0.91 therms. This gives me the solution that 1 Therm = 1.1 Gallons of propane.
Then I looked at our propane and natural gas bills to determine the unit prices for each. For propane, this is $1.49 per gallon. For natural gas, it is $0.80 a therm.
Next I determined a standard measurement to base our calculations on. I chose therms. Since 1 therm = 1.1 Gallons of Propane, we will take 1.1 gallons of propane times $1.49. This will give us an equivalent to the price per therm.
1.1 * $1.49 = $1.63
We can conclude that, at current market prices (January 1, 2009), natural gas is much cheaper. Currently, $0.80 of natural gas would cost you $1.63 if it was bought in propane.
"

thenodnarb
11-14-2011, 1:57 PM
NG is cheaper than propane. If you could fill the big tank from the house and then fill the small bottles you would have a winner.

Found this on another site.

"In order to figure out the cost of propane verses natural gas, I did the following:

I first needed to determine an appropriate conversion between gallons of propane and therms of natural gas. I found a website that listed a rough approximation between therms and gallons of propane:
100 cubic feet (1 CCF) of natural gas is very nearly 1 therm (0.95 1.05, typically, depending on gas analysis). 1 gallon of LPG is about 0.91 therm. (91000 BTU).
After determining that 1 gallon of Propane = 0.91 therms, I calculated how much one therm equals by doing the by dividing 1 gallon of propane by 0.91 therms. This gives me the solution that 1 Therm = 1.1 Gallons of propane.
Then I looked at our propane and natural gas bills to determine the unit prices for each. For propane, this is $1.49 per gallon. For natural gas, it is $0.80 a therm.
Next I determined a standard measurement to base our calculations on. I chose therms. Since 1 therm = 1.1 Gallons of Propane, we will take 1.1 gallons of propane times $1.49. This will give us an equivalent to the price per therm.
1.1 * $1.49 = $1.63
We can conclude that, at current market prices (January 1, 2009), natural gas is much cheaper. Currently, $0.80 of natural gas would cost you $1.63 if it was bought in propane.
"

Is natural Gas And Propane an equal fuel? I mean, are they close enough that you can say 1 gallon of NG vs LP has the same energy. I know that a NG appliance like a cloths dryer does not run well on LP. It may just be that some parts need interchanging to run them properly.

Also, since the NG that comes into your home probably isn't pressurized to the point that it is liquid, you are probably not going to fill your propane tanks with NG unless you had a very expensive 3 or 4 stage compressor. I looked into compressing methane for the purpose of long term storage, and realized that the compressor could be several thousands of dollars, and compressing a flammable gas can be dangerous. It's better left to the professionals. It works to fill one tank from another because the pressure is so high already, but you can't go from 100 psi(NG in your home) to 800 psi(LP in a container) without a compressor.

BruceR
11-14-2011, 6:14 PM
Methane (NatGas) has 1 carbon atom and 4 hydrogen atoms. Propane has 3 carbons and 8 hydrogens. Butane (think cig lighter) has 4 carbons and 10 hydrogens. Methane is the least expensive of the three, with butane the most expensive (and most energy per unit volume).

For our purposes, we need to forecast which fuel will be most available. There might be natural gas still flowing in the distribution system -- or not. There might be emergency aid delivered in the form of propane cylinders -- or not. Longer term, one could devise a compost digester to generate natual gas but for, say, an earthquake, that's not likely to happen either.

There's no substitute for having multi-fuel (and multi-ammo) capabilities.

bohoki
11-15-2011, 10:36 PM
i like propane its drawback is when it is cold it doesn't run as well

generally all the fuels have equalized in cost when purchased at bulk rates

i prefer propane lanterns and stoves cause they are generally instant on

but i also like white gas stoves and lamps but they take some fiddling with the pumping and levers

and whoa camp fuel is insanely priced lately so i use gasoline

i also refill my little bottles as i have a ceramic type heater and it only lasts 4 hrs on a 1 pounder and i can fill up nearly 20 with a bbq tank that costs $15 to fill at the gas station

kemasa
11-16-2011, 7:18 AM
Butane does not seem to work well at high altitudes.

Gas is nice in that it is easy to refill the container before a trip. Propane is more of a problem refilling (can't do it at home for a 20lb tank). Having to decide whether you will have enough propane can end up finding out that you didn't have enough. Propane is easier to transport and is less likely to leak, plus you can run everything off a 20lb tank for a long trip without ever having to refill anything.

There are good and bad aspects to everything though.

bohoki
11-16-2011, 12:55 PM
butane works better at high altitude than propane but still not as good as liquid camp fuel

i have a couple winchester propane lanterns one like new the other well used you just cant beat that radioactive mantle gaslight

stix213
11-16-2011, 1:09 PM
Another use for the small propane cans is they would be very barterable in a long term emergency. Almost anyone who has ever done any camping has a portable propane stove or grill, and will need a means of cooking once their microwave and electric stove stops working.