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Steve1968LS2
10-24-2011, 11:06 AM
Ok,

Have a bunch of 6-gallon (gamma lid) buckets comming from Costco.. how many pounds of pinto beans fits in a 6-gallon bucket? Obviously with as little air at the top as possible.

Same with rice, macaroni, and other stuff.. is there a chart someplace?

Thanks,
SR

ExAcHog
10-24-2011, 11:15 AM
I usually get about 90% of a 40lb bag of beans/rice from Costco into a superpail. I just throw the extra into a ziploc.
I dont know of a chart being available...

problemchild
10-24-2011, 3:33 PM
Ok,

Have a bunch of 6-gallon (gamma lid) buckets comming from Costco.. how many pounds of pinto beans fits in a 6-gallon bucket? Obviously with as little air at the top as possible.

Same with rice, macaroni, and other stuff.. is there a chart someplace?

Thanks,
SR

Towards the end of the honeyville vid I posted it lists the quantities.

Minute 6:45

http://youtu.be/bok_vkkVJe4

Librarian
10-24-2011, 4:05 PM
6 gallons is about 48 pounds of water.

See this site: http://www.powderandbulk.com/resources/bulk_density/material_bulk_density_chart_b.htm

Find your material.

Multiply the g/cubic centimeter value by 48 to get pounds/6 gallons.

Example:
Beans, White 43-48 0.69-0.77 Picking the smaller density, you should get
.69 * 48 lb = 33.12 lb of white beans in a 6-gallon bucket.

(Or, if you'd rather, 6 gallons is 0.80 and a fraction cubic feet; multiply the lbs/cubic foot by 0.8.
Example
43 lb/cubic foot *.8 cubic foot = 34.4 lb in a 6-gallon bucket.)

Steve1968LS2
10-24-2011, 6:24 PM
Towards the end of the honeyville vid I posted it lists the quantities.

Minute 6:45

http://youtu.be/bok_vkkVJe4

6:53 actually :)

So 45 lbs beans/rice/sugar in a 6 gallon bucket.. or 27 pound flour/dried milk or 17 pounds of potato flakes/oats

Thanks

Dubious_Beans
10-24-2011, 7:02 PM
About 45 lbs of hard wheat berries or oat groats fits in a 6 gallon pail.

77bawls
10-24-2011, 7:44 PM
To calculate the cubic inches of a cylinder it's diameter x diameter x depth x .7854.

I don't know who that helps but it's something I remember, I'm an automotive tech. That's how you calculate the cubic inches of an engine, only at the end you would multiply the number of cylinders.

ExAcHog
10-24-2011, 11:11 PM
Great video Problemchild...Now I know what all the fuss is over that store. I wish we had one in NorCA.

ShootinMedic
10-24-2011, 11:20 PM
WOW Is there anything you don't know the exact answer to!?
(spoken in awe)

6 gallons is about 48 pounds of water.

See this site: http://www.powderandbulk.com/resources/bulk_density/material_bulk_density_chart_b.htm

Find your material.

Multiply the g/cubic centimeter value by 48 to get pounds/6 gallons.

Example:
Beans, White 43-48 0.69-0.77 Picking the smaller density, you should get
.69 * 48 lb = 33.12 lb of white beans in a 6-gallon bucket.

(Or, if you'd rather, 6 gallons is 0.80 and a fraction cubic feet; multiply the lbs/cubic foot by 0.8.
Example
43 lb/cubic foot *.8 cubic foot = 34.4 lb in a 6-gallon bucket.)

Librarian
10-24-2011, 11:29 PM
WOW Is there anything you don't know the exact answer to!?
(spoken in awe)
Oh yes, lots!

But the existence of Google has just been wonderful! There's so much out there that it's possible to become nearly an 'instant expert' on small things.

My advantages are I have a lot of time, I have a large vocabulary, and I understand how to 'play' Google to find what I want. (I suppose a very good high school, 2 bachelor's degrees and an actual Master's in Library Science probably help, too.)

Bigger things take more time; I started wrestling with CA law and Supreme Court cases on the old talk.politics.guns usenet group (just an astonishing swamp :eek:), in the early to mid 90s.

BlueVue
10-25-2011, 12:04 AM
This sort of question is what Wolfram Alpha was made for:
http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=weight+of+6+gallons+of+pinto+beans
(51 lbs)
http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=weight+of+6+gallons+of+rice
(43 lbs)
http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=weight+of+6+gallons+of+dry+macaroni
(22lbs)

Beats the pants off of Google when you need simple facts.

Librarian
10-25-2011, 12:41 AM
This sort of question is what Wolfram Alpha was made for:
http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=weight+of+6+gallons+of+pinto+beans
(51 lbs)
http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=weight+of+6+gallons+of+rice
(43 lbs)
http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=weight+of+6+gallons+of+dry+macaroni
(22lbs)

Beats the pants off of Google when you need simple facts.

Ask it about gun control...

And I think its result for pinto beans is a bit high - it uses 1.0 g/cubic centimeter, effectively the same as water, so should have come up with 48 lb or less - depends on how the beans are packed, since there will be some airspace around beans but of course no airspace around water.

DavidR310
10-25-2011, 9:32 AM
I thought he was telling us:

home made pounds of X fits into a 6-gal bucket :facepalm:

MudCamper
10-25-2011, 9:48 AM
WOW Is there anything you don't know the exact answer to!?
(spoken in awe)

If not, he'll find out! That's why he's the LIBRARIAN! :notworthy: :)

Stormfeather
10-25-2011, 10:26 AM
6 gallons is about 48 pounds of water.

See this site: http://www.powderandbulk.com/resources/bulk_density/material_bulk_density_chart_b.htm

Find your material.

Multiply the g/cubic centimeter value by 48 to get pounds/6 gallons.

Example:
Beans, White 43-48 0.69-0.77 Picking the smaller density, you should get
.69 * 48 lb = 33.12 lb of white beans in a 6-gallon bucket.

(Or, if you'd rather, 6 gallons is 0.80 and a fraction cubic feet; multiply the lbs/cubic foot by 0.8.
Example
43 lb/cubic foot *.8 cubic foot = 34.4 lb in a 6-gallon bucket.)

I hate math. . . .:confused:

Librarian
10-25-2011, 5:09 PM
I hate math. . . .:confused:

I think the only time this particular math problem should come up is when figuring out how many 6-gallon buckets to buy when they come on sale.

But it does bring to mind a useful book to ad to your collection:
"Handbook of Chemistry and Physics" from CRC Press (http://www.crcpress.com/). For purposes of disaster prep, this is for really long-term, where one might have to reconstruct an industrial process. Just about any edition from 1950 forward should be fine, since it deals with stuff at a fairly practical level (though by no means a 'how to' book).

They have further, more specific books.

I've often thought what I'd really like is an English translation of Diderot's Encyclopedia (http://quod.lib.umich.edu/d/did/).