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ExtremeX
10-23-2011, 6:01 PM
Water storage / rotation ideas for those with limmited space.

Since I am a little limmited on space, and I feel potable water should be the most import item, only thing I can think of getting is a BUNCH of these things...

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41BCHJy%2BgFL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Anyone have a better idea?

bohoki
10-23-2011, 6:21 PM
attach a water heater on the cold line do not hook up gas

Ripon83
10-23-2011, 7:08 PM
Consider a filtration and treatment method. Smaller to store, longer shelf life, but more expensive....and you need access to some kind of water supply.....stream, river, rain collection....

cbaer5
10-23-2011, 7:14 PM
there are companies that do odd shaped tanks that fit in corners and are available in smaller sizes they are a little pricy tho. I my self have been using two liters.

ExtremeX
10-23-2011, 7:16 PM
there are companies that do odd shaped tanks that fit in corners and are available in smaller sizes they are a little pricy tho. I my self have been using two liters.

Are you filling 2 liter bottels youself or are you buying sealed from a store?

cbaer5
10-23-2011, 7:20 PM
filling them myself I have one of those carbon filters under my sink it is supposed to remove the bacteria. but I have read that you can trust a municipal source for up to 4 months

11HE9
10-23-2011, 8:38 PM
Consider a filtration and treatment method. Smaller to store, longer shelf life, but more expensive....and you need access to some kind of water supply.....stream, river, rain collection....

This is what I'm doing. We are on a well, and we are not far from a river. I am also going to start rain collection this year, the wife found a cool quick/easy set up to get 55 gallons off each down spout :thumbsup:

ireload
10-24-2011, 2:19 AM
Extreme if you are close to the LA or OC are you can go to Honeyville in Ranch Cucamonga. The sell several style of water containers there. They have at least three styles can you can use for limited space. Their website does not show the water containers though.

Ripon83
10-24-2011, 2:22 AM
What did you find for the rain collection? Curious minds want to know?


This is what I'm doing. We are on a well, and we are not far from a river. I am also going to start rain collection this year, the wife found a cool quick/easy set up to get 55 gallons off each down spout :thumbsup:

11HE9
10-24-2011, 6:42 AM
What did you find for the rain collection? Curious minds want to know?

I'm going to do this on two of my down spouts, I just need to figure out a good pre-filter at the top to keep the debris out

119748

problemchild
10-24-2011, 9:12 AM
Extreme if you are close to the LA or OC are you can go to Honeyville in Ranch Cucamonga. The sell several style of water containers there. They have at least three styles can you can use for limited space. Their website does not show the water containers though.

They now have 2.5gal cubes and stackable 5 gallons. I have a bunch of those.

XDseb
11-21-2011, 9:26 AM
I wanted to add to this thread. I recently found this Aqua-Tainer 7 gallon jug by Reliance at my local Wal-Mart for $10.88 which I think is a pretty damn good deal. Havent seen these containers this cheap anywhere else, and they are great for camping for storing water for those who dont have a lot of storage space.

heres all the info courtesy of REI...
http://www.rei.com/product/618168/reliance-aqua-tainer-7-gallon


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v63/sebastian22/Emergensy%20supplies/photo.jpg

Nooner7
11-21-2011, 10:58 PM
I just ordered one of these: http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?prodid=11610210

scarville
11-22-2011, 10:46 AM
The Aquatainers stack nicely too but don't go more that two high if they are full. You can also get a hand pump for them.

I'll have to check out Honeyville. It's only a couple of miles from the indoor range I regularly use.

till44
11-22-2011, 1:59 PM
I like the Aquatainers. They stack well enough and seem pretty sturdy. You need to rotate them occasionally because the ones on the bottom may slightly collapse with the weight and time.

HIG541
11-23-2011, 12:28 PM
bought a 1000 liter water cube for $125 bucks in Chino the other day. guy has a ton of them down there. along with all other sizes. i put it in the corner of the garage and built shelving on top of it. works great!

ireload
11-23-2011, 1:19 PM
They now have 2.5gal cubes and stackable 5 gallons. I have a bunch of those.


Looks like I'll have to do a another "road trip" when I get some extra cash on hand.

Ironmany2k
11-28-2011, 3:08 PM
http://www.peoplepoweredmachines.com/rainreserve/complete.htm


I'm going to do this on two of my down spouts, I just need to figure out a good pre-filter at the top to keep the debris out

119748

Beagle
11-28-2011, 5:16 PM
If you live in the city with little space I would get some waterbrick (waterbrick.org) they are expensive but very portable and strong. Then I would get some Water Preserver mix that in with the water and you're good for 5 years.

Nice thing about these bricks are they only weight 32 pounds when filled so it's pretty easy to transport. Each can only hold 3.5 gallon though so that makes it very expensive.

The ready store also have a video on youtube where they drop the brick from a second floor and it didn't leak.

QQQ
11-28-2011, 5:57 PM
bought a 1000 liter water cube for $125 bucks in Chino the other day. guy has a ton of them down there. along with all other sizes. i put it in the corner of the garage and built shelving on top of it. works great!

WOW

I want one of these.

I have an Aquatainer but am afraid to stack anything heavy on top of it, including another Aquatainer. I know the same company makes a stronger version (called the rhino or something) that can be stacked, but it is considerably more expensive per unit of storage volume.
The water bricks look great but are very pricey for the amount they can store.
Bottled water is an okay option.

10 rounds
11-28-2011, 7:05 PM
I bought a 55 gal drum, pump and water treatment at www.sosproducts.com in Van
Nuys for $ 82.00. They have some good stuff there.

JoeJinKY
11-28-2011, 7:26 PM
I am also going to start rain collection this year, the wife found a cool quick/easy set up to get 55 gallons off each down spout :thumbsup:

Birds poop on your roof, and the rain washes the bird poop into those downspouts. Be VERY careful about what you drink off of your roof.

Curtis
11-28-2011, 8:33 PM
I have always liked the Life Saver Systems (http://www.lifesaversystems.com/). The jerrycan looks like it would work great for a home emergency kit.

This is another system I like: Life Giving Force (http://www.lifegivingforce.com/lgf-rr-series/rapid-response-10000uf/)

11HE9
11-28-2011, 8:58 PM
Birds poop on your roof, and the rain washes the bird poop into those downspouts. Be VERY careful about what you drink off of your roof.

I would never trust ANY water source in a emergency situation 100%. Rain water would still get filtered/boiled before being used for drinking/cooking ;)

QQQ
11-28-2011, 11:45 PM
Birds poop on your roof, and the rain washes the bird poop into those downspouts. Be VERY careful about what you drink off of your roof.

First flush diverters can be made cheaply and without too much hassle.

The Bacon Eater
11-29-2011, 9:33 AM
I would love a rain catch, but living in an apt building its a little more challenging. I use a lot of 2liter soda bottles. I use city water to fill with a cap full of bleach to each bottle. I usually swap them out every year and i found that to get the bleach smell/taste out i just poor the water back and forth between bottles a few times and the air/disturbance dissipates the bleach taste. I keep them out of light (because algae will grow after a few months in sunlight) and sealed up in cardboard boxes. I know its not the best way and im working on getting a 30 and 15 gallon barrels to add to them.

Those 7gal jugs posted above look like they would stack well and they are not transparent which is another plus. Those usgi 5gal water containers are also great.

11HE9
11-29-2011, 11:00 AM
I use a lot of 2liter soda bottles. I use city water to fill with a cap full of bleach to each bottle. I usually swap them out every year...

You may be over doing it on the bleach...


"Do I Need to Treat Water?
Once you properly clean containers, fill them with potable, or safe, drinking water. All public water supplies are already treated and should be free of harmful bacteria. However, as an additional precaution, it is recommended that you add 5-7 drops, about 1/8 teaspoon, of chlorine bleach per gallon of water stored. This precaution protects you against any lingering organisms in storage containers that may have been inadvertently missed during the cleaning process."

From here- http://www.nationalterroralert.com/safewater/

TheChief
11-29-2011, 11:04 AM
With regards to the rain run off collectors, depending on your roofing material, you could get additional chemicals added to the run off. I have heard, but not researched, that some of the asphalt shingles and rubber membrane type roofs will leach petro-chemicals into the run off that could be poisonous.

Our rain barrels are used for gardening only during normal times. In a situation where there is no water from the tap, they would be used for toilet flushes and the like. If it was going to be an extended situation and I wasnt too worried about burning up the fire wood or if the gas supply for the stove was still working, I would distill the rain barrel water.

http://i1208.photobucket.com/albums/cc380/ExpertPC/StovetopWaterStill.jpg

VictorFranko
11-29-2011, 11:10 AM
http://www.quakekare.com/images/ProductImages/2c_det_water_barrel.jpg + http://www.quakekare.com/images/ProductImages/2d_det_water_preserver.jpg

Keeps water good for 5 years.
I built a heavy duty cabinet to protect the barrels from earthquake debris.
It also houses many of my other supplies and keeps them out of sight of prying eyes.

source (http://www.quakekare.com/)

11HE9
11-29-2011, 11:22 AM
Our rain barrels are used for gardening only during normal times. In a situation where there is no water from the tap, they would be used for toilet flushes and the like.

My intended uses too ^^^

During a normal outage, we have 500 gallons that can gravity feed, plus what's in the hot water heater.

In a extended outage situation, I have a backup plan for the well for potable water ;)

QQQ
11-29-2011, 1:34 PM
You may be over doing it on the bleach...


"Do I Need to Treat Water?
Once you properly clean containers, fill them with potable, or safe, drinking water. All public water supplies are already treated and should be free of harmful bacteria. However, as an additional precaution, it is recommended that you add 5-7 drops, about 1/8 teaspoon, of chlorine bleach per gallon of water stored. This precaution protects you against any lingering organisms in storage containers that may have been inadvertently missed during the cleaning process."

From here- http://www.nationalterroralert.com/safewater/

Agreed. A cap full per bottle is a lot of bleach. It may not cause any immediately noticeable harm at the concentrations you're talking about but it's certainly much more than needed.

Also, regarding your earlier post with the trash bin attached to the gutters, here's a publication that gives good details on how to make a first flush diverter to avoid catching too much debris when it first rains:

Texas Rainwater Harvesting Manual (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CEYQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.twdb.state.tx.us%2Fpublicatio ns%2Freports%2Frainwaterharvestingmanual_3rdeditio n.pdf&ei=w17VTtSwJKewsALT6dWEDw&usg=AFQjCNGYG-vYfrW1HJKCnH7fQzE-cmp7hw)

QQQ
11-29-2011, 1:35 PM
My intended uses too ^^^

During a normal outage, we have 500 gallons that can gravity feed, plus what's in the hot water heater.

In a extended outage situation, I have a backup plan for the well for potable water ;)

To get back to the OP's point- how can one easily fit 500 gallons in a small space? I, for one, am renting out a single bedroom in a private home, so all of my supplies need to fit in the room. I really liked that 1000 Liter water cube thing because it's about as efficient in terms of space as you can get.

11HE9
11-29-2011, 7:08 PM
regarding your earlier post with the trash bin attached to the gutters, here's a publication that gives good details on how to make a first flush diverter to avoid catching too much debris when it first rains

I've seen a few kits for the f.f.diverters on line, looks fairly simple to make.

There have been a few of the cubes on my local CL for a while. I might re-think the barrels and go cube since the cage would add a level of protection to the tank.

I think the blue aqua-tainers posted earlier would be the best choice for an apartment or very limited space. Several containers could be tucked away in different areas, and they could be moved easily.

fendter
11-29-2011, 7:27 PM
If you live in the city with little space I would get some waterbrick (waterbrick.org) they are expensive but very portable and strong. Then I would get some Water Preserver mix that in with the water and you're good for 5 years.

Nice thing about these bricks are they only weight 32 pounds when filled so it's pretty easy to transport. Each can only hold 3.5 gallon though so that makes it very expensive.

The ready store also have a video on youtube where they drop the brick from a second floor and it didn't leak.

I got 12 of the waterbricks and can definitely recommend them. i also have 2 35 gallon blue plastic drums. I prefer the bricks.

jvpark
11-30-2011, 12:05 AM
I personally have 2.5 and 5 gallon storage treated and rotated every 5 years. Good luck trying to move a 55 gallon on barrel and god forbid if your water gets contaminated. Keep it small and portable.

The Bacon Eater
11-30-2011, 11:06 AM
I will scale it back to about 1/4 cap then. I dont swap them out for one year and did not want the water going bad. Thanks

LoooongGun
11-30-2011, 11:19 AM
Your tap-water has come to you, chlorinated of course and maybe more, from the big tower a few miles up-stream. The water has been in the pipe-line for up to 6-months, and when you get it, it's still good fresh water. If you don't like what's in it, you have probably changed over already. But taking tap-water and storing it in 2-L or 3-L pop-jugs is a very easy and safe expedient, and ONE HELLUVALOT cheaper than other exotic bottled water (which might be just glorified tap-water, anyway.) Your 50- 100- 500- 1,000-gallon stores of water won't fit your BOB or back-pack too easily either. Most filtration systems and bite-valve manufacturers have adapters to pop-jugs in their inventory. Wise up!

zeke2517
12-10-2011, 12:10 AM
http://rainwaterhog.com/
Really cool even if you dont do raiwater

EmptySkuLL
12-10-2011, 2:40 AM
To get back to the OP's point- how can one easily fit 500 gallons in a small space? I, for one, am renting out a single bedroom in a private home, so all of my supplies need to fit in the room. I really liked that 1000 Liter water cube thing because it's about as efficient in terms of space as you can get.

You have enough room in a single bedroom to fit approx 36 cubic ft of water tank??? 1000 liters is approx 265 gal, which is approx 35-36 cubic ft of volume. So assuming a square cube: thats 6ft x 6ft x 6ft... Hope you have a HUGE sliding glass door in that bedroom... A garage I can see it fitting in, bedroom, not so much...

Plus as I recall, the cubes that the guy that sells Chino have an aluminum or stainless steel cage around them for reinforcement, which would add another few inches of space around the cube, if its the same guy that was mentioned on here awhile back...

madland
12-10-2011, 2:49 AM
6-1 gallon jugs in a sealed cardboard box with handles at Costco for about $4.00 I like these because they are sealed with threaded caps,each gallon has it's own carrying handle, the cases are very portable, and stackable. I'd be careful how heavy you stack but you gotta figure the bottom boxes on a full pallet of these is under many,many cases on top. There is an expiration date on the side so you know when you should rotate it out and replace with fresh stock (about 2yr shelf life for the current cases in my garage). I also always keep a few cases of bottled stuff just in case. My .02

JCavSD
12-10-2011, 5:47 AM
A few months ago I picked up two aqua-tainers and two 15 gallon drums from Emergency Essentials. Small enough that they can be tucked away in a closet, and light enough that even full they can be moved around and hefted into a vehicle without much effort.

When transferred to another container the public water probably won't maintain a decent residual for long. The residual starts out stronger at the point of injection (treatment plant, well, etc.) but gets weaker over time. It can be greatly reduced by the time it reaches the customers tap. Also, much of the public water has transitioned from chlorine to chloramine (chlorine plus ammonia) disinfection. Chloramines maintain a much longer lasting but much weaker disinfectant residual, and may be quickly overcome by a powerful contaminant. Best bet is to clean and disinfect all storage containers before adding water, and always add chlorine and mix well before storing long-term.

Johnnie Wadcutter
12-10-2011, 7:55 AM
I use any plastic container that comes through the house- milk, juice etc. Filtered(ge smartwater) and filled to the top and dated. Then I rotate them out when I water the plants. Cheap and laying around, figure better than nothing. I keep 2 in the freezer and when the power goes out(like last week) I put them in the fridge to keep it cold for a little while longer. Not the best but it works for now.