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View Full Version : Diff btw SMK 77gr HPBT and Moly HPBT


Jicko
02-14-2007, 12:33 AM
What's the difference? With the "Moly"....

Is the BH Mk262 using the "Moly" ones or the non-"Moly" ones?

ocabj
02-14-2007, 7:54 AM
Moly bullets have a moly coating.

Simple answer: stick with plain, naked bullets.

MK262 uses plain, copper non-moly bullets.

Act fast and order the Nosler 77gr BTHP for $126.95 per 1000 from the Nosler website.

Jicko
02-14-2007, 8:48 AM
Just checked.... $8ish shipping... ie. $135 shipped to you.... this is HELL hard to beat price for *quality* high performance bullets!!!

I bet even the Golden West 62gr will cost like $130 shipped....

I should get in on a couple thousand of those Nosler...

ocabj
02-14-2007, 8:50 AM
Yes, you should buy now. Only 2 months ago in Dec, they had them for $99.95 per 1000. I bought 2000 back then. I have 2000 more in transit at the $126.95 price.

xrMike
02-14-2007, 10:14 AM
What's the diff. in powder charge between 77 grain and say, 69 grain, and even 55 grain bullets? Not looking for exact numbers, just a rough idea of charge weights for those 3 bullet weights (pick whatever powder you like).

In pistol you generally use less powder as you load heavier bullets, I assume it's the same for rifle?

xrMike
02-14-2007, 10:24 AM
Also, ocabj, I want to order some of those Nosler bullets. Not sure whether I should get the 69s (cheaper, non-cannelured) or the 77s (more $, I assume they're cannelured).

I have the WOA Svc Rifle upper, 1:7, 20-inch. The club I'm in shoots "reduced" Service Rifle matches at 100 yards. So I need to be competitive at 100, and I rarely shoot farther than 200, at least for now.

Which bullet should I buy? Also, do you crimp your .223 target loads? Don't you need a cannelured bullet to crimp?

Anything else you can add is much appreciated, as I'm trying to decide the best bullet to buy for first time reloading of .223.

ocabj
02-14-2007, 10:27 AM
Generally, you would load more powder for a lighter weight bullet because of pressure. But that is not always the case, especially when looking at the heavy weight .22cal (80gr and above) in competition chambers.

http://www.radomski.us/njhp/cart_tech.htm <- check out the loads here

http://hodgdon.com/data/rifle/223rem.php <- Hodgdon online data

I'm not sure what would be the best for reduced course shooting at 100 yards. Quite a few people ditched 69gr because they couldn't get them to shoot optimally at 200 yards in a 1 in 7" twist. I would probably try the 69 anyway. Personally, for 100 reduced, I'd go with the cheapest bullet possible that shot the most accurate. You may even get lucky and find that 55gr or 62gr FMJ work great in at 100 yards.

The only rifle cartridges I have ever crimped were 7.62x54R cast loads using 170gr gas checked lead bullets.

Where are you shooting the reduced matches at?

xrMike
02-14-2007, 10:48 AM
I'm not sure what would be the best for reduced course shooting at 100 yards. Quite a few people ditched 69gr because they couldn't get them to shoot optimally at 200 yards in a 1 in 7" twist. I would probably try the 69 anyway. Personally, for 100 reduced, I'd go with the cheapest bullet possible that shot the most accurate. You may even get lucky and find that 55gr or 62gr FMJ work great in at 100 yards.

55 grain Remington does pretty good at 100. Winchester white box 55 grain was a little better, although I can no longer find that at Walmart anymore.

The only guy that's beating me anymore is using Black Hills blue box, in 62 and/or 69, I think. He's also shooting a rifle with one of those RRA NM uppers on it. He's usually scoring ~245 out of a possible 250. I can't seem to beat him, as my avg. score is around 235. I'm hoping an upgrade in bullet quality will net me some more points.

The only rifle cartridges I have ever crimped were 7.62x54R cast loads using 170gr gas checked lead bullets.So nobody crimps .223 then? For some reason I thought crimping was desired/necessary in semi-autos, don't know where I got that from though.

Where are you shooting the reduced matches at?Laguna Seca. The Laguna Seca Shooting Sports Association has monthly "reduced" matches for High Power and Service Rifle.

Don't get the wrong idea about our skills or anything though :D , it's basically a benchrest-style competition -- we don't shoot from multiple positions, or even use slings. It's all strictly benchrest. Nowhere near the difficulty or skill that you employ in your "real" matches. But it's a start, for me.

ocabj
02-14-2007, 10:53 AM
No, I haven't found a need to crimp 223. All my bullets are non-cannelured, so I couldn't crimp them anyway.

What targets are you using for those matches?

Jicko
02-14-2007, 11:01 AM
No, I haven't found a need to crimp 223. All my bullets are non-cannelured, so I couldn't crimp them anyway.

What targets are you using for those matches?

I thought the Nosler 77gr is cannelured, isn't it??

ocabj
02-14-2007, 11:10 AM
I thought the Nosler 77gr is cannelured, isn't it??

I hope not. The ones I bought back in Dec were not (and were noted to be non-cannelured on the web store).

The ones currently up on the Nosler specials page do not indicate cannelured or not, but I put a note in my order to cancel my order if the 77gr bullets are cannelured. They shipped it, so I'm assuming they are not cannelured.

xrMike
02-14-2007, 11:22 AM
What targets are you using for those matches?I don't know for sure, I think they say something like "NRA Small Bore 100 yard reduced" or something like that. I'll look at one when I get home.

Here's what they look like though:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v84/xrMike/guns/AR100yds_2.jpg

Trust me, we call it a Service Rifle match, but that's where the similarity ends to the kind of shooting that you do.

We basically shoot 5 strings of 5 rounds each, for a max. possible 250 points. And in our club, "Service Rifle" means any iron-sighted military style rifle that was ever conceivably used in any conflict anywhere in the world. Guys will sometimes shoot K-31s, Garands, SKS, m-14s -- but the AR's always win. :D