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View Full Version : Can someone write a quick overview of what it take to start reloading .223s??


Jicko
02-13-2007, 10:46 PM
What equipments are needed?

And what's the general process?

(assuming the audience do know something about reloading handgun ammo and/or assuming the audience know nothing about reloading....)

C.G.
02-13-2007, 10:56 PM
Just an overview of re-loading:
http://www.rcbs.com/default.asp?menu=1&s1=5

I highly recommend this kit, has pretty much everything you need (and that was the lowest price I could find):
http://www.midsouthshooterssupply.com/item.asp?sku=000449357

If you are shooting a semi, I'd recommend this die:
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=469170

If shooting bolt action, you might want something like this one:
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=122025
or maybe even the micrometer:
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=665744

You will also need a shellholder for .223 and maybe later a trimmer.

Fjold
02-14-2007, 6:50 AM
Here's a link to a good referance from the reloading equipment manufacturers organization. It walks you through the whole process.
http://www.reload-nrma.com/

Jicko
02-14-2007, 7:57 AM
I already have a Dillon 550B for my handgun loads.... so I am just looking at what do I need on top of what I already had....

I think the 1 thing that I don't need to do with my handgun loads are trimming the case.... is that it?

Omega13device
02-14-2007, 8:01 AM
Well the dies are different...no duh, but thought I'd mention it. :p

Jicko
02-14-2007, 8:09 AM
Well the dies are different...no duh, but thought I'd mention it. :p

:D oh.... I forgot THAT.... :D

Jicko
02-14-2007, 10:45 AM
Some of you guys probably are using Dillions 550B like what I had.

Are these all I need?
".223 Remington 3-Die Set (#10839) $57.95"
http://dillonprecision.com/template/p.cfm?maj=47&min=0&dyn=1&
"RL 550B Conv Kit .223 Remington (#20128) $39.95"
http://dillonprecision.com/template/p.cfm?maj=13&min=1&dyn=1&

I do have an extra "toolhead" to mount all those dies on....

I don't need to go for "carbide" die right?

What does "lubrication" means? I don't have to lube my case for my handgun loads, do I have to for rifle rounds? If so, what lube to use and how?

I heard from ocabj that he doesn't "crimp" his rounds, so do i still need the "Taper Crimp Die" then?

C.G.
02-14-2007, 11:01 AM
I don't need to go for "carbide" die right?

What does "lubrication" means? I don't have to lube my case for my handgun loads, do I have to for rifle rounds? If so, what lube to use and how?

I heard from ocabj that he doesn't "crimp" his rounds, so do i still need the "Taper Crimp Die" then?

You can only get carbide dies for straight wall casings, as far as I know.

If you do not have carbide die, yes, you do have to lube.

ocabj
02-14-2007, 11:12 AM
I would get the basic Redding 2 or 3 die set, but then also get the Redding Competition Seating die. That die is pretty pricey, $75 or so of the top of my head, but it is immeasurably more convenient for .223, considering you will probably be reloading various bullet weights. It is so much easier to be able to dial in the micrometer for your various bullet weights/sizes.

I believe Dillon has carbide dies for bottlenecked cartridges, but you still have to lube, so it doesn't make sense to buy them.

Jicko
02-14-2007, 11:14 AM
You can only get carbide dies for straight wall casings, as far as I know.

If you do not have carbide die, yes, you do have to lube.


Dillion got .223 Carbide die set
".223 Remington Carbide 3-Die Set (#10096) $123.95"
http://dillonprecision.com/template/p.cfm?maj=47&min=0&dyn=1&

BUT it also have the note: "PLEASE NOTE: Carbide rifle dies still require case lubrication!"

:confused:

grammaton76
02-14-2007, 12:17 PM
You technically don't have to lube with carbide dies. However, I lube anyway, as I would far rather have a smooth action when reloading. Lube is cheap.

Alanski56
02-14-2007, 2:06 PM
Just an overview of re-loading:
http://www.rcbs.com/default.asp?menu=1&s1=5

I highly recommend this kit, has pretty much everything you need (and that was the lowest price I could find):
http://www.midsouthshooterssupply.com/item.asp?sku=000449357

If you are shooting a semi, I'd recommend this die:
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=469170

If shooting bolt action, you might want something like this one:
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=122025
or maybe even the micrometer:
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=665744

You will also need a shellholder for .223 and maybe later a trimmer.

This basically mirrors my setup and it works great. One thing I'll add is to consider the RCBS X-Die for the small base. With the X-Die you only have to trim your brass once during it;s lifetime.

Matt-man
02-14-2007, 2:56 PM
I'm told the Dillon carbide dies for bottleneck cases are intended for high-volume commercial reloaders who wear out steel dies. Case lubrication is still required for these dies, so don't spend the extra money on them.

At nationalmatch.us the concensus on .223 micrometer seating dies is that the Forster handles compressed loads (like a case full of Varget) better than the Redding - the seater stem in the Redding has a tendency to crack after a while. I have micrometer seating dies from both companies and they seem to be otherwise comparable, so I'd get the Forster over the Redding. A cheaper alternative is Hornady's standard seating die with their micrometer upgrade.

For what it's worth, I don't crimp my rifle rounds either.

C.G.
02-14-2007, 6:26 PM
I'm told the Dillon carbide dies for bottleneck cases are intended for high-volume commercial reloaders who wear out steel dies. Case lubrication is still required for these dies, so don't spend the extra money on them.

At nationalmatch.us the concensus on .223 micrometer seating dies is that the Forster handles compressed loads (like a case full of Varget) better than the Redding - the seater stem in the Redding has a tendency to crack after a while. I have micrometer seating dies from both companies and they seem to be otherwise comparable, so I'd get the Forster over the Redding. A cheaper alternative is Hornady's standard seating die with their micrometer upgrade.

For what it's worth, I don't crimp my rifle rounds either.

I have Forster micrometer for my Grendel 6.5 and it is worth the extra money!:)

C.G.
02-14-2007, 6:28 PM
Dillion got .223 Carbide die set
".223 Remington Carbide 3-Die Set (#10096) $123.95"
http://dillonprecision.com/template/p.cfm?maj=47&min=0&dyn=1&

BUT it also have the note: "PLEASE NOTE: Carbide rifle dies still require case lubrication!"

:confused:

Just shows you how much I know.:D

MIB916
02-14-2007, 6:37 PM
I have a dillion 550B. I use the .223 carbide dies. I have a RCBS pro-trimmer (electric) to trim the cases to 1.750. After that they are sent to the Dillion for de-prime and size & prime. Next is the powder charge of either W748 @ 26.2 gr or H335 @ 25.0gr. I use a Winchester 55gr FMJBT with a cannelure.

I have reloaded over 1500 rounds this way and no problems. I use these rounds in my OLL's.. They work great.

Best thing to do is use a good quality brass and primers (no CCI) either Federal or Winchester. Just remember, used brass needs to be trimmed!!!

Jicko
02-15-2007, 7:54 AM
I have a dillion 550B. I use the .223 carbide dies. I have a RCBS pro-trimmer (electric) to trim the cases to 1.750. After that they are sent to the Dillion for de-prime and size & prime. Next is the powder charge of either W748 @ 26.2 gr or H335 @ 25.0gr. I use a Winchester 55gr FMJBT with a cannelure.

I have reloaded over 1500 rounds this way and no problems. I use these rounds in my OLL's.. They work great.

Best thing to do is use a good quality brass and primers (no CCI) either Federal or Winchester. Just remember, used brass needs to be trimmed!!!

Couple of questions:

1) Do you have problems using the 550B's powder measure to accurately measure and drop the powder into the case?

2) So you trim before you size?

3) You do lube your case before sizing?

4) What's your seating depth?

5) Do you "crimp" your rounds?

Franksremote
02-15-2007, 8:16 AM
A bit off topic - does anyone in the SF Bay Area stock One Shot lube?

MIB916
02-15-2007, 1:56 PM
I use the small powder charge bar. I can keep the powder charge pretty accurate. I seat the bullet just to the top of the cannelure. I ALWAYS case check each round to ensure the proper depth. I have talked to alot of my reloading gurus about trimming and then sizing. They stated that due to the short neck of the .223 trimming and then sizing is okay. I due lube my cases with Dillion rapid lube. As far as the crimp, (on the Dillion it is the 4th stage) I put on a slight crimp to ensure the round is tight in the casing.

I have made a couple of dummy rounds to chamber through the weapon. I check the feed on the mag follower and make sure the round will seat into the action. I aslo make sure the extractor will pull the case out. If you have any other questions, let me know i'll Pm you if you like.:)

Fjold
02-15-2007, 2:13 PM
Couple of questions:

1) Do you have problems using the 550B's powder measure to accurately measure and drop the powder into the case?

2) So you trim before you size?

3) You do lube your case before sizing?

4) What's your seating depth?

5) Do you "crimp" your rounds?

1.) Not with ball powders

2.) I check random case about every third reload as I pull them out of the tumbler and if I find one that is overlength then I trim the batch

3.) Always, I use Hornady One-shot, quick and easy

4.) Nope, as long as you have decent neck tension (you can't pull the bullet with your fingers) there's not enough recoil in the AR to bother with. Plus it won't improve accuracy enough to matter in the typical AR chamber (you're loading 223 ammo in a 5.56 chamber)

Gunsrruss
02-15-2007, 8:55 PM
1. fire the round- ( .223, .308, 30.06 )
2. Bring back to the house and tumble clean ( fine pecan works the best for me. I use Brasso as my cleaner. Works for me )
3. lube all case with the RCBS lube pad using dillon lube- just roll it and put into die.
4. Deprime and size ( I use Small base dies, RCBS )
5. Run all sized brass through Wilson gage- Checking for length and fit
6. Trim any that require- usually 10 tho. under ( using RCBS electric trimmer with 3-way cutters.
7. Tumble again to remove lube
8. Prime the brass using RCBS hand primer ( this lets me look at each piece before I put powder in it. That way if it's a high primer I can fix it without having to deal with a completely loaded round. You want to fix a primer on a loaded round??? Not me.)
9. Load powder in the round using my Pact dispenser and digital scale. Dial in 23.5gr and get 23.5gr
10. After a box of 50 are loaded with powder then set the bullet with my RCBS or my progressive Lee press which I use as a single stage.
These ten Items work for me. I'm an NRA Master shooter because of them.