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THE 0NE
02-13-2007, 10:08 PM
Anyone have any info on the numatic buffer????

C.G.
02-13-2007, 10:17 PM
If you want to use search functions spell it pneumatic.

I never felt the need for one for 5.56 so I can't answer your question (eventhough I have an MGI buffer for my .50 Beowulf), but here is what was on ARF.com:
http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=3&f=15&t=313583

I did not remember a thread about them here on Calguns, so I did a search and came up empty.

thmpr
02-13-2007, 10:17 PM
Olympic has a pneumatic buffer that I was thinking of buying. There are two versions: Non-adjustable and adjustable. Heard great things about it.

thmpr
02-13-2007, 10:21 PM
C.G.... Same thought, to use it on my Beowulf and 308 rifles.

pksbshp
02-13-2007, 10:21 PM
Bushmaster makes a Hydraulic.....
http://www.bushmaster.com/shopping/buttstocks/hb-2a.asp

THE 0NE
02-13-2007, 10:23 PM
oh oops i sounded it out ha.... so cuts recoil down???? i just wanted to know why it would be wanted???had some people ask about them..

C.G.
02-15-2007, 7:14 PM
C.G.... Same thought, to use it on my Beowulf and 308 rifles.

I have an MGI buffer and it works well with the Beo; wouldn't bother with it on a 5.56.

PIRATE14
02-15-2007, 7:17 PM
They do work, but not everyone needs one.......:rolleyes:

fal_762x51
02-15-2007, 7:24 PM
A .223 has recoil?

Sorry I had to be a smart@ss.

C.G.
02-15-2007, 8:28 PM
A .223 has recoil?

Sorry I had to be a smart@ss.

No, but the .50 Beowulf does!

twl
02-16-2007, 7:14 AM
The MGI RRB(RateReducing/RecoilReducing Buffer) is currently the best performing buffer on the market, and has been for the 7 years that it has been on the market.

The MGI RRB operates differently than hydraulic or pneumatic buffers, and is totally mechanical, so there are no seals or gasses or fluids to worry about.

In operation in a carbine, the RRB works like this:
Shot fired, and pressurized gas is forced into the gas tube and into the expansion chamber in the bolt carrier.
The RRB, being a heavy buffer, takes longer to energize into motion, and this gives a very slight delay to bolt opening and extraction beginning. This is important, because in a carbine with the shorter gas system, the brass case is still obturated and swelled against the chamber when extraction normally begins, causing the difficult extraction issues known on the AR carbine. So, a slight delay allows the case to come back closer to normal before extraction starts.
Then the heavier mass of the RRB also causes a slowing of the cyclic rate, keeping action speeds controlled, and reducing high-speed battering of the action parts.
At the tail end of the recoil stroke, the buffer and carrier mass generally just slam into the back of the buffer tube, and transfer the energy to your shoulder. The RRB has a short plunger with heavy tungsten weights, which are propelled into counter-motion just prior to the buffer body hitting the back end of the buffer tube, and this "live-hit" of two opposing masses in motion(buffer/carrier moving backward, propelled tungsten weights moving forward inside the buffer body) helps to cancel most of the felt recoil, and whatever isn't cancelled out is spread out over more time, to ease the felt recoil too. It is the closest thing possible to the Sullivan Constant Recoil principle, that can fit into the short stroke of an AR15.
Then, as the buffer/carrier begin to move foward, under pressure from the recoil spring, the extra mass comes into play again, as the heavier mass will help the system pick up a round and close the bolt more reliably, especially if there is any dirt, gunk, sand, or debris that might try to drag against the workings of the system.
Finally, the bolt closes, and the tungsten weights deliver a secondary blow to the closure, ensuring that there will be no bolt-bounce occuring. In a full-auto firing sequence, or very rapid tapping, the mass of the heavy buffer/carrier closing home against the barrel, gives somewhat of a forward impulse that helps to counteract against the initial firing impulse from the next shot fired(rapidly or full-auto).

The result is that the RRB works in all aspects of the recoil cycle, gives less felt recoil, controls muzzle-rise, slows cyclic rate, reduces battering, improves ejection reliability, is less brutal on the bolt, improves feed reliability, and eliminates bolt bounce.

Not only that, but the MGI RRB is multi-purpose, so that you can use the basic RRB in a carbine, or purchase an inexpensive delrin spacer to adapt it to an A2 rifle length buffer tube. AND you can get another spacer to make it work in an AR10 rifle, or DPMS or Knights or Fulton rifle length 308 AR-type rifle(Not carbine - only rifle in 308). And this RRB buffer works great in other calibers for the AR, with virtually any rifle or pistol caliber that can fit into the system.
So you get a great buffer, and it's convertible to different buffer tube lengths, and even the .308 platforms, without having to buy a whole new buffer, if you don't want to. Just get the spacers, and move the RRB to whatever gun you need.

That's about all you could ever ask from a buffer, folks.
Nothing else even comes close.

Of course, I'm the MGI factory rep, so you may think me biased.
However, I guarantee you that everything I said here is true, and I will stand behind this information, and our buffer 100%, and money back if you are not satisfied.
Please contact me with any questions or orders by IM, email, or phone.

Ken Cochrane
02-16-2007, 7:22 AM
Brownells makes one that they rave about. I think the main reason to have one is that it helps stabilize the gun for faster target aqusition between shots. Brownells claims that it stops bolt jump. Anything that softens the recoil velocity will also help keep optics ligned up

twl
02-16-2007, 7:41 AM
Brownells makes one that they rave about. I think the main reason to have one is that it helps stabilize the gun for faster target aqusition between shots. Brownells claims that it stops bolt jump. Anything that softens the recoil velocity will also help keep optics ligned up

I think that the Brownells hydraulic one is made by Enidine.
It's less expensive than the MGI RRB, but the Enidine only works on the rear-stroke, and some users have complained that it's hard to pull the charging handle back and getting the bolt to lock back, because is feels like a hydraulic shock absorber when you pull the charging handle.

Some people have preferred this Enidine unit to use in the LWRC piston-operated guns, because the LWRC piston system doesn't like heavy buffers. However, the POF users seem to prefer the MGI RRB with our 2x recoil spring, as a combination that they really like for the POF piston system.