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MFortie
10-19-2011, 2:04 PM
I've pressured canned various soups, stews, chilis I make in the past and they always seemed a bit over cooked when I open them up to eat later.

I tend to cook my stuff slowly (hours) when I intend to eat it right away and have canned the leftovers.

Is there a rule of thumb for reducing cooking time for a recipe when it's going to be pressure canned afterwards?

Thanks,

Mark

problemchild
10-19-2011, 4:12 PM
The pressure canning does the cooking. Dont cook first.

http://pickyourown.org/how_to_can_soups.htm

MFortie
10-19-2011, 4:41 PM
Makes sense. I see they recommend cooking the meat first -- since ham is cured, I assume it doesn't need cooking? (Ham & bean soup...)

Thanks for the site; I was looking there the other day when you recommended their salsa recipe...

Regards,

Mark

problemchild
10-19-2011, 5:03 PM
Makes sense. I see they recommend cooking the meat first -- since ham is cured, I assume it doesn't need cooking? (Ham & bean soup...)

Thanks for the site; I was looking there the other day when you recommended their salsa recipe...

Regards,

Mark

You can cook meat to "rare" and then hot pack with boiling water. You can also cold pack raw meat and add boiling water.

When I can up pork butt/shoulder I cook first to cook off the fat. Then I use the juices once boiling as the boiling water. The pork shoulder with some salt, onion and garlic is awesome. I baked the pork shoulder in the oven at 215f for 6 hours. The meat was still very firm and not tender yet. Most of the fat had cooked off so I was GTG. I cut the meat into small chunks and skimmed off the fat from the liquid and discarded. I then re-boiled the juice with 50% added water to have enough to fill all jars. Ive done the same with chuck roast. I posted both cannings here a while back.

Joewy
10-19-2011, 6:19 PM
Yes, You brown the meat. Not cook it. This makes it look better and removes some of the fat. Fat is a pain when you can.

problemchild
10-19-2011, 7:27 PM
Yes, You brown the meat. Not cook it. This makes it look better and removes some of the fat. Fat is a pain when you can.

You might do that with chuck but not with pork butt. The pork is littered with heavy fat and your jar would be 50% fat not to mention its not safe with that much fat in it. At least that is what I read from the old pros.