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zushikikato
10-16-2011, 1:01 PM
Hey guys i have a few questions regarding hsc test and intrafamily transfer. I used search but couldnt find e results i wanted.

First i am 20 years old and i am trying to get my first handgun.
I was hopeing to get it transfered from my dad after having him purchase the one i wanted.

However my dad is getting pretty old and cannot understand reading and taking tests really well as he is use to. He knows all the basic rules of owning firearms and the safety as he owns quite a few from a long time ago. I am basically asking is the hsc test difficult? How many can you get wrong and how many questions are there?

Also regarding to the intrafamily transfer, after a handgun is in his possession can he jiust give it to me and while the paper to the doj is being sent i can use it and take it around? Or do i have to wait for them to send back some mail before i can use it on my own at the range?


Also forgot to note that i will also be getting my hsc before having him transfer it to me of course.

Librarian
10-16-2011, 1:57 PM
The HSC is really easy; except for I think one question where you have to think 'politically correct', it's common sense.

There's a study guide available here: http://ag.ca.gov/firearms/forms/pdf/hscsg.pdf

As for the OpLaw form, all you need do is drop it in the mail with your check; you do not need to wait for return paperwork, though some should appear eventually.

That might become an issue if you were to want to immediately turn around and sell the handgun, but otherwise mailing it is all you are obligated to do.

zushikikato
10-16-2011, 6:00 PM
^Thank you for answering my questions! Hopefully I can finally own a handgun sometimes soon! =)

voiceofreason
10-16-2011, 6:10 PM
Your father is not supposed to buy the gun if it was never really intended for him.

Save a few bucks in DROS/HSC/PPT and wait a while and buy one when you're 21.

Either go with your father and shoot his handguns, rent when going with a friend, get a shotgun and have less fun but have far more firepower than a pistol at your disposal, or get a .22 rifle and have a GREAT time. Putting a cheapie red dot on it or a scope and the personality of a .22 rifle changes dramatically IMO.

Since you're looking for an HK45, you likely have money. .45 is expensive to shoot.

If you don't have money, get a 9mm and spend your money on training, a REALLY GOOD holster, & ammo.

The HK P2000 has the roughest, grittiest trigger I've ever felt in my life. I'd avoid that one.

Merc1138
10-16-2011, 6:10 PM
^Thank you for answering my questions! Hopefully I can finally own a handgun sometimes soon! =)

Yeah, don't worry about the HSC, it's so easy that it makes the DMV written test seem like the SAT. Common sense(well, for gun people anyway) and a basic understanding of CA's silly politically correct way of doing things is all it really takes to pass. As I recall the self test questions in the guide are pretty much right off of the test itself.

Merc1138
10-16-2011, 6:13 PM
Your father is not supposed to buy the gun if it was never really intended for him.

Save a few bucks in DROS/HSC/PPT and wait a while and buy one when you're 21.


Uhh, you realize that you can buy a handgun for someone as a gift, right? It's not uncommon for parents to buy guns for their kids(or kids to buy guns for their parents for that matter). Also because it's from his father(the intrafamily transfer) he only has to find the $19 for the oplaw form, not a $35 PPT, and he'd have to do the HSC in a year if he bought the handgun himself anyway.

zushikikato
10-16-2011, 6:16 PM
Your father is not supposed to buy the gun if it was never really intended for him.

Save a few bucks in DROS/HSC/PPT and wait a while and buy one when you're 21.

Either go with your father and shoot his handguns, rent when going with a friend, get a shotgun and have less fun but have far more firepower than a pistol at your disposal, or get a .22 rifle and have a GREAT time. Putting a cheapie red dot on it or a scope and the personality of a .22 rifle changes dramatically IMO.

Since you're looking for an HK45, you likely have money. .45 is expensive to shoot.

If you don't have money, get a 9mm and spend your money on training, a REALLY GOOD holster, & ammo.

The HK P2000 has the roughest, grittiest trigger I've ever felt in my life. I'd avoid that one.'

Is it illegal for my dad not to buy a gun and gift it to me? I thought that straw purchase thing is only implied for people who are prohibited from owning?
Also I want a pistol because I want to have one that I can go to a variety of different indoor range and also learn to shoot handguns and be comfortable with my own. At the moment I already have a shotgun and a .22 but I want a handgun to call me own.
I was looking into beretta m92s for a while but if I were to chose one pistol I think I would go for a higher caliber and higher quality gun right?

paul0660
10-16-2011, 6:30 PM
Your father has to answer this question honestly:

a. Are you the actual buyer of the firearm(s) listed on this form? Warning: You are not the actual buyer if you are acquiring
the firearm(s) on behalf of another person. If you are not the actual buyer, the dealer cannot transfer the firearm(s) to
you.

This is clearly muddy.........if mud can be clear. It is in fact designed to catch people who are buying guns for others who are ineligible or prohibited, which you are not. When you file the intrafamilal transfer form your backround will be checked, and if that goes through, all will be well.

Voice of Reason? Ironic.

Mssr. Eleganté
10-16-2011, 6:37 PM
'

Is it illegal for my dad not to buy a gun and gift it to me? I thought that straw purchase thing is only implied for people who are prohibited from owning?

It's perfectly legal for your dad to buy a handgun with his own money and give it to you as a gift.

It's an illegal straw purchase if he uses your money to buy the handgun and then give you the handgun. This is true even if you are not prohibited from owning a firearm.

paul0660
10-16-2011, 6:44 PM
It's an illegal straw purchase if he uses your money to buy the handgun and then give you the handgun. This is true even if you are not prohibited from owning a firearm.

When you have the time, find some code on that. My money does not have my name on it. Even if I were to use my CC to pay for another's gun, I might owe that person enough money to make the purchase a repayment of a loan.


like I said, muddy. thanks.

Mssr. Eleganté
10-16-2011, 6:56 PM
When you have the time, find some code on that. My money does not have my name on it. Even if I were to use my CC to pay for another's gun, I might owe that person enough money to make the purchase a repayment of a loan.


like I said, muddy. thanks.

Well, if you sign the Form 4473 saying that the gun is for you but it is really for somebody else then you are committing perjury, right? Gifts are not "muddy" at all since the instructions for the Form 4473 explain that using your own money to buy a firearm as a gift for somebody else is perfectly legal. The instructions for the Form 4473 also explain that using somebody else's money to buy a firearm for them is not legal.

Question 11.a. Actual Transferee/Buyer:

For purposes of this form, you are the actual transferee/buyer if you are purchasing the firearm for yourself or otherwise acquiring the firearm for yourself (e.g., redeeming the firearm from pawn/retrieving if gtom consignment, firearm raffle winner). You are also the actual transferee/buyer if you are legitimately purchasing the firearm as a gift for a third party.

ACTUAL TRANSFEREE/BUYER EXAMPLES:
Mr. Smith asks Mr. Jones to purchase a firearm for Mr. Smith. Mr Smith gives Mr. Jones the money for the firearm. Mr Jones is NOT THE ACTUAL TRANSFEREE/BUYER of the firearm and must answer "NO" to question 11.a. The licensee may not transfer the firearm to Mr. Jones.

However, if Mr. Brown goes to buy a firearm with his own money to give to Mr. Black as a present, Mr. Brown is the actual transferee/buyer of the firearm and should answer "YES" to question 11.a.

However, you may not transfer a firearm to any person you know or have reasonable cause to believe is prohibited under 18 USC 922(g), (n), or (x).

Please note: EXCEPTION: If you are picking up a repaired firearm(s) for another person, you are not required to answer question 11.a. and may proceed to question 11.b.