PDA

View Full Version : Register THIS, Jerry Brown! "CNC, Stereolithography, and the end of gun control"


tankarian
10-11-2011, 9:59 AM
Good read:

"The Third Wave, CNC, Stereolithography, and the end of gun control." (http://www.popehat.com/2011/10/06/the-third-wave-cnc-stereolithography-and-the-end-of-gun-control/)

Due to forces of technology (CNC controlled machine tools, cheap computation, open source ethics, and social sharing of designs) gun control is utterly dead. Its a corpse, staggering along, not yet aware that its been gut shot, its blood pressure has dropped to zero, and its brain (such as it is) is about to die the True Death.

http://thingiverse-production.s3.amazonaws.com/renders/a1/83/1c/75/f5/IMAG0246_preview_medium.jpg

http://img15.imageshack.us/img15/6558/hk41620clone3960.jpg

Wernher von Browning
10-11-2011, 11:28 AM
Well. At last a post that doesn't involve gun people taking potshots at each other over the Moonbeam Massacre ("I'm a true 2A fan!" "No you're not, I am!" "Yer muddah!") all for the amusement of the Bradys, who must be wetting themselves with sheer joy by now.

Good read:

"The Third Wave, CNC, Stereolithography, and the end of gun control." (http://www.popehat.com/2011/10/06/the-third-wave-cnc-stereolithography-and-the-end-of-gun-control/)


Yes, but overly gushy. I think the author is smoking something.

Try to outlaw gun powder and well move to railguns and big capacitors. Try to outlaw primers and well see plans for electronic ignitions up on wikileaks by the end of the day.

Good luck with that, pilgrim. Better off going back to spears. I will bet the author hasn't the faintest idea what's involved in shooting, except maybe what he learned from video games.


An AR-15 lower is not a gun. It's only by a happy oversight and bureaucratic idiocy that we're able to make our own and call it a "gun" for (non)registration purposes. Without a bolt, barrel, and upper, it's nothing but a fairly unstressed blob of metal (or even lesser stuff) that holds the real works together.

If Somebody wanted to close this loophole, it would be easy -- place controls on the sales of barrels. That is something that I can pretty much guarantee your home workshop bodger with a clapped-out Bridgeport will not be able to make. You don't think They can do that? See what happened last Sunday.

My advice? Forget the geek-fanboy raving about how every kitchen will soon be cranking out AR-15 lowers at the push of a button. Anybody with a milling machine can already do that (I did that). Heck, in desperation, people with a drill press have done that (it may not be pretty but it's good enough to work). And I wouldn't make one out of billet. That's dumb, unless you want to prove a point. Buy a forged blank with nothing done to it yet, for $25, and you'll have a better piece of metal, of a better machining, more appropriate alloy than common 6061, to start with. If you can't make just one lower by turning the wheels by hand, you won't have much success trying to start up your own production line. ("Tomorrow, I think I'll learn to play the grand piano.") And if you can make one, maybe you'll be happy with just that one for a while. The fact that you can make two, or twenty, using cheap automation, doesn't make much practical difference unless you are planning to arm your entire family or other mob. And the lower is still the cheapest, most minor part of the whole assembly -- the rest of the works will cost you ten to twenty times as much before you have something that will go "bang" on demand.

(The cookbook for turning the knobs can be found here:
http://www.lecreg.com/P4x4/ARblank.pdf


Nobody is going to be making M1911 pistols from scrapyard metals anytime soon. Nobody is going to be achieving proper heat treating on mystery metals in their toaster oven. And... Nobody is going to be making the jump from aluminum to steel without climbing a formidable learning curve. (As one metallurgist put it to me once, "We consider aluminum as an alternative to injection-molded plastic").

As society continues to dumb down, we have fewer and fewer people who are actually able to work with metals. Along come some people who say "Hey, it's just a lump of metal, how difficult can this be? I'll just push this button and make a copy." Heck, these days we can't even find many people in the general population who can still work with wood. A router confuses them. And they're going to try to work with stuff that contains the highest temperatures and pressures we're ever likely to encounter?

POLICESTATE
10-11-2011, 11:36 AM
Bleh. I'm more interesting in making a device that can extract gold from old circuit boards without violating hazardous materials laws.

curtisfong
10-11-2011, 11:42 AM
Nerds often forget the government has absolute power. They can (and will) regulate any technological paradigm shift into uselessness if corporations tell them to.

See also the DMCA, ACTA etc. etc. etc.

Note I said corporations.

Wernher von Browning
10-11-2011, 11:44 AM
Bleh. I'm more interesting in making a device that can extract gold from old circuit boards without violating hazardous materials laws.

Why the conditions? Just extract and be done... :D

(or... do it in some other state).

BigFatGuy
10-11-2011, 11:48 AM
I have no real interest in making my own firearms, but that DIY article was fascinating! thank you...

Wernher von Browning
10-11-2011, 11:50 AM
Nerds often forget the government has absolute power. They can (and will) regulate any technological paradigm shift into uselessness if corporations tell them to.

See also the DMCA, ACTA etc. etc. etc.

Note I said corporations.


Yup.

We may have already seen the peak of "freedom" as enabled by computers and the Internet. More regulations are coming as the government and private industry sees and plugs the loopholes. Viz. Amazon knuckling under to state sales taxation. Skype being bought by Microsoft... and monitoring / archiving communications. Ditto Google+ . Government shutting down cell service to prevent communication between the "undesirables" (not in Egypt but in San Francisco). And so it goes.

Wernher von Browning
10-11-2011, 11:54 AM
I have no real interest in making my own firearms, but that DIY article was fascinating! thank you...

Which, the 80-page PDF instructions for making a lower?

BigFatGuy
10-11-2011, 12:04 PM
Which, the 80-page PDF instructions for making a lower?

Sorry, yes, the "knob turning" cookbook.

I've done a small amount of machining via g-code, so it was particularly fascinating to me... kind of like learning to cook by reading Julia Child. I've got the article set aside to read completely later on...

Wernher von Browning
10-11-2011, 12:34 PM
Sorry, yes, the "knob turning" cookbook.

I've done a small amount of machining via g-code, so it was particularly fascinating to me... kind of like learning to cook by reading Julia Child. I've got the article set aside to read completely later on...

The neat thing is, if you have your own components, you can machine the lower to have tighter clearances than standard -- so the trigger group has less sideways play, so the lugs on the upper fit more snugly in the pockets. Less rattle...

jimmykan
10-11-2011, 1:07 PM
One day I will be able to construct my own UAV attack drone from an etch-a-sketch and a kite.

You'll see... :TFH:

notme92069
10-11-2011, 1:09 PM
One day I will be able to construct my own UAV attack drone from an etch-a-sketch and a kite.

You'll see... :TFH:

You forgot duct tape

Overbear
10-11-2011, 1:17 PM
move to railguns and big capacitors.

Just to point out, a "rail gun" is actualy rather easy to make, one can whip one up that will put out 1500fps aluminum darts with just a few parts, some wire, a old microwave, a few old tosters, and some know how.

Trick is, they arn't exactly "portable" as they must be bench mounted and require 220v 50a circuits to fire.

Freq18Hz
10-11-2011, 1:23 PM
Some good ideas in that very poorly written article.

-Freq

Joewy
10-11-2011, 1:28 PM
Ive watched guys make really nice AK's with little more than handtools, a grinder, some files and an old lathe and a few hammers. Then heat treat the parts in an old oil drum lined with sand and clay and fired with used motor oil.

Ive seen revolvers made the same way from cast aluminum and cold rolled blower shafts for barrels.

Its a matter of skill in what you are doing more than technology.

The end of gun contol requires sheer will to do it. Nothing else.

jwkincal
10-11-2011, 1:30 PM
If Somebody wanted to close this loophole, it would be easy -- place controls on the sales of barrels. That is something that I can pretty much guarantee your home workshop bodger with a clapped-out Bridgeport will not be able to make. You don't think They can do that? See what happened last Sunday.



Dude. Firearms are way older than CNC... they're way older than power tools. How do you think they made barrels before electric motors? I've seen plans for manual boring of iron rods which pre-dated the internet, too. They really do make auto pistols in tents in Afghanistan, also with no internet.

The article isn't wrong because guns aren't easy to build. It's wrong because the "open-source" revolution has nothing to do with it. Doesn't anyone read the Anarchist's Cookbook anymore? Handbook of Chemistry and Physics? If I ran the big bad government, I'd just outlaw the internet cause it seems all ideas would just stop if it was gone... :(

Joewy
10-11-2011, 1:58 PM
Well. At last a post that doesn't involve gun people taking potshots at each other over the Moonbeam Massacre ("I'm a true 2A fan!" "No you're not, I am!" "Yer muddah!") all for the amusement of the Bradys, who must be wetting themselves with sheer joy by now.




If Somebody wanted to close this loophole, it would be easy -- place controls on the sales of barrels. That is something that I can pretty much guarantee your home workshop bodger with a clapped-out Bridgeport will not be able to make. You don't think They can do that? See what happened last Sunday.


Whats so hard about making barrels???

Wernher von Browning
10-11-2011, 3:03 PM
Dude. Firearms are way older than CNC... they're way older than power tools. How do you think they made barrels before electric motors?

How many did they make? You're going to equip how many burlap-shirt survivalists this way? Do you know what a rifling machine involves? A few homebrew types have made their own rifling machines. But it's a curiosity more than anything else. If somebody wants to get serious about making barrels, there aren't but a few dozen of the old Pratt & Whitney machines in existence, and they go for big bucks on the rare occasion when a shop goes belly up and they get auctioned off.


You or I can make one of anything. Making ten gets to be a problem. Making a hundred is going to be out of the question.


I've seen plans for manual boring of iron rods which pre-dated the internet, too. They really do make auto pistols in tents in Afghanistan, also with no internet.

Sure. Would you like to put a thousand rounds through one of those? Remember that if there's one thing cheaper in Afghanistan than a gun, it's the life of the local monkey operating it. (Ever notice that their holy men all seem to be missing one eye and one hand? It's like a job requirement).

If car factories were outlawed, you or I could build a car, too. One car. And we'd have the roads pretty much to ourselves (except for the government cars...) That won't mean we've solved the problem of cars being generally unavailable -- only solved it locally.

And then there's the question of what you're going to do with your one and only hand-whittled muzzleloader. Hide behind trees and pick off the King's Men, who have full-auto rifles because they don't have any restrictions on obtaining them?

jwkincal
10-11-2011, 3:14 PM
You use it to take the OPFORs weapons, yes...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FP-45_Liberator


And then there's the question of what you're going to do with your one and only hand-whittled muzzleloader. Hide behind trees and pick off the King's Men, who have full-auto rifles because they don't have any restrictions on obtaining them?

If you feel the need to fire 1000 rounds through your home-built in the course of combat, then you need to revisit your OPORDs 'cuz your tactics leave something to be desired...

Joewy
10-11-2011, 3:15 PM
How many did they make? You're going to equip how many burlap-shirt survivalists this way? Do you know what a rifling machine involves? A few homebrew types have made their own rifling machines. But it's a curiosity more than anything else. If somebody wants to get serious about making barrels, there aren't but a few dozen of the old Pratt & Whitney machines in existence, and they go for big bucks on the rare occasion when a shop goes belly up and they get auctioned off.


You or I can make one of anything. Making ten gets to be a problem. Making a hundred is going to be out of the question.



Sure. Would you like to put a thousand rounds through one of those? Remember that if there's one thing cheaper in Afghanistan than a gun, it's the life of the local monkey operating it. (Ever notice that their holy men all seem to be missing one eye and one hand? It's like a job requirement).

If car factories were outlawed, you or I could build a car, too. One car. And we'd have the roads pretty much to ourselves (except for the government cars...) That won't mean we've solved the problem of cars being generally unavailable -- only solved it locally.

And then there's the question of what you're going to do with your one and only hand-whittled muzzleloader. Hide behind trees and pick off the King's Men, who have full-auto rifles because they don't have any restrictions on obtaining them?

You know very little to nothing about making guns.

My rifling machine cost me less than a grand and has rifled many, many rifles. it weighs less than 100 lb and I can take it almost anywhere. Gets excelent groups too.

Wernher von Browning
10-11-2011, 3:16 PM
Whats so hard about making barrels???

Nothing is "hard" if you have the equipment and expertise. Acquiring both takes time and money. Seriously, if YOU can make barrels, 1) you can make a living at it and 2) I might very well buy one.

Barrels are like gears. Sure, everybody "knows" in theory how to make gears -- but nobody does. You buy them off the shelf, or you don't get any. (At best, one can make some straight-cut spur gears, and I've done that. But you'll never see a non-specialist gear shop cutting helical or worse yet hypoid gears. And then there's the final grinding and hardening aspect for gearing that's supposed to have some precision, or take high power).

Here's some background reading.
http://firearmsid.com/Feature%20Articles/RifledBarrelManuf/BarrelManufacture.htm

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/gunsmithing/home-built-rifling-machine-126815/

Can it be done? Sure. But I'll bet the number of living people who have done home-brew rifling can be counted on one hand.

Wernher von Browning
10-11-2011, 3:17 PM
You know very little to nothing about making guns.

My rifling machine cost me less than a grand and has rifled many, many rifles. it weighs less than 100 lb and I can take it almost anywhere. Gets excelent groups too.

OK. I need a 24" barrel for an AR-15, 1:10 (yes, that's right) twist. What's your price and delivery time?

And how about some pictures? Seriously. If you have that, you know more about rifling than anybody else here and we'd like to learn from your experience.

As for "know nothing about making guns," yes, I will agree with you 100 percent. I have made an AR-15 lower. Big deal. That's not gunsmithing or gunmaking. It impresses the heck out of people who have difficulty working a hammer, but it's not gunmaking. But I know how little I know, and I know what I can and can't do in the time I have.

Wernher von Browning
10-11-2011, 3:21 PM
You use it to take the OPFORs weapons, yes...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FP-45_Liberator



If you feel the need to fire 1000 rounds through your home-built in the course of combat, then you need to revisit your OPORDs 'cuz your tactics leave something to be desired...


I can just see it now. Two opposing armies, each trained to fire their own crappy guns just long enough to capture the other side's guns -- only to find out they were trying to do the same thing.

jwkincal
10-11-2011, 3:23 PM
I can just see it now. Two opposing armies, each trained to fire their own crappy guns just long enough to capture the other side's guns -- only to find out they were trying to do the same thing.

Sounds like a great sci-fi story!

Wernher von Browning
10-11-2011, 3:26 PM
Sounds like a great sci-fi story!

Doesn't it though? :D This is the sort of thing Keith Laumer would have written.

hawkeye
10-11-2011, 4:27 PM
http://img15.imageshack.us/img15/6558/hk41620clone3960.jpg

Isn't she beautiful?:wub:

SickofSoCal
10-11-2011, 4:34 PM
What a dumb article.

The state would just move in a few nanoseconds to make all those things illegal.

Palmaris
10-11-2011, 7:46 PM
I don't think those guys in Pakistan have any machines (lathe mill CNC ....) Look like they are making with their hands. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SpURk1E3Q9c
Sorry, they do have some machines: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cQDvBrVCCM

bodger
10-11-2011, 9:34 PM
If Somebody wanted to close this loophole, it would be easy -- place controls on the sales of barrels. That is something that I can pretty much guarantee your home workshop bodger with a clapped-out Bridgeport will not be able to make. You don't think They can do that? See what happened last Sunday.


I'm just glad to find someone who knows what a bodger is. :D

Arisaka
10-11-2011, 9:57 PM
Isnt it just as easy as banning guns? Poof. Thats it. As far as making guns goes, it sure isnt hard to figure out how to make a blowback smoothbore open bolt subgun, of you really wanted to.

nicki
10-12-2011, 10:51 AM
If we can present this in a 8 second soundbite or create a edited 30 second to 1 minute video showing the manufacture of such a gun from scratch, then we can show the "public" how a "black market" in guns would work.

Now, the Black Market in guns would follow the same pattern as the Black Market in Drugs. The product with the highest profit potential would be the one that would dominate the market.

So, the Black Market gun of choice probably would be a Mac 11, Sten guns and/or a Tec 9. Simple design and all already have so called street creed.

While I don't see things homemade Glocks due to their polymer frames, I do see standard guns like 1911's.

Of course here are some features the "black market" guns would have.

1. No serial numbers or better yet, markings and serial numbers of guns that already are in circulation. Would kinda of screw up registration laws if say you have 100 guns floating around with the same markings and numbers:43:

2. Smooth bore barrels. While accuracy would suffer a bit, it is kind of hard to do ballistic markings when there are none.

3. Selective fire.

4. High capacity magazines.

5. Suppressor adaptable.

The cost in raw materials would be under 50 dollars, the street price for a "super cold" select fire machine pistol

Nicki

Maestro Pistolero
10-12-2011, 11:08 AM
My advice? Forget the geek-fanboy raving about how every kitchen will soon be cranking out AR-15 lowers at the push of a button.Your points are well made, but ad hominem attacks and name calling adds nothing to them.

21SF
10-12-2011, 11:18 AM
Big fat wow, next!

Overbear
10-12-2011, 11:18 AM
When can I get my Mark II mars pattern boltgun, fireing 40mm caseless, rocket powered, armor peircing, explosive rounds? (2 points to anyone who knows the reference)

swilson
10-12-2011, 11:19 AM
I don't agree with homebuilds being an end to gun control, with lawmakers throwing their hands up in the air in defeat as you laugh hysterically while milling an 80% lower. They'll just outlaw the manufacture of receivers by anybody except licensed dealers, probably citing the same old "unsafe" argument that got us the handgun roster, as well as scaring the public into thinking that criminals are making their own firearms in minutes without registration and without serial numbers. That's an easy sell even to conservatives and even many gunowners. Just wait until it becomes popular, especially if a 80% build ends up at the scene of a police shooting. I can also see anti's arguing that nowhere in the 2nd amendment that it says "manufacture".

That said we all know the outcome of prohibition.

chuckdc
10-12-2011, 11:22 AM
I'm just glad to find someone who knows what a bodger is. :D

Sheesh.. that's easy.. bodger= one who bodges. How hard is that?:D:rolleyes:

swilson
10-12-2011, 11:22 AM
When can I get my Mark II mars pattern boltgun, fireing 40mm caseless, rocket powered, armor peircing, explosive rounds? (2 points to anyone who knows the reference)

Was that from the NYPD for their Barrett .50 that they want to shoot down terrorist-piloted commerical airliners with from a moving police helicopter?

InGrAM
10-12-2011, 11:34 AM
I don't agree with homebuilds being an end to gun control, with lawmakers throwing their hands up in the air in defeat as you laugh hysterically while milling an 80% lower. They'll just outlaw the manufacture of receivers by anybody except licensed dealers, probably citing the same old "unsafe" argument that got us the handgun roster, as well as scaring the public into thinking that criminals are making their own firearms in minutes without registration and without serial numbers. That's an easy sell even to conservatives and even many gunowners. Just wait until it becomes popular, especially if a 80% build ends up at the scene of a police shooting. I can also see anti's arguing that nowhere in the 2nd amendment that it says "manufacture".

That said we all know the outcome of prohibition.

+1 This exactly..

Wernher von Browning
10-12-2011, 12:01 PM
Your points are well made, but ad hominem attacks and name calling adds nothing to them.

The "ad hominem" was directed at the article, not the OP here who linked to it. As others have pointed out, it wasn't a particularly well written article.

dfletcher
10-12-2011, 1:01 PM
The law will evolve to address technology. It will be reactive, but it will eventually get there. Law that can classify a DIAS as the legal equivilent of a fully functioning, complete machine gun can address home manufacture.

curtisfong
10-12-2011, 1:04 PM
The law will evolve to cripple technology.

Fixed it for you.

bohoki
10-12-2011, 2:13 PM
yea it reminds me of color printing and currency

Joewy
10-13-2011, 3:35 AM
I don't agree with homebuilds being an end to gun control, with lawmakers throwing their hands up in the air in defeat as you laugh hysterically while milling an 80% lower. They'll just outlaw the manufacture of receivers by anybody except licensed dealers, probably citing the same old "unsafe" argument that got us the handgun roster, as well as scaring the public into thinking that criminals are making their own firearms in minutes without registration and without serial numbers. That's an easy sell even to conservatives and even many gunowners. Just wait until it becomes popular, especially if a 80% build ends up at the scene of a police shooting. I can also see anti's arguing that nowhere in the 2nd amendment that it says "manufacture".

That said we all know the outcome of prohibition.

Im willing to bet that the roster has led to the jailing and harming of many more people for simply possesing a firearm than has either caught criminals or saved peoples lives by keeping unsafe guns off the street.

notme92069
10-13-2011, 7:30 AM
Im willing to bet that the roster has led to the jailing and harming of many more people for simply possesing a firearm than has either caught criminals or saved peoples lives by keeping unsafe guns off the street.

I agree the law is worthless in preventing crime. Has anybody ever been charge with a crime regarding the roster of restricted handguns?

jasilva
10-13-2011, 8:22 AM
The problem with the thinking of all you "the law will just ban xxxxx once they get wind of it" types is this, you are thinking like law abiding sheeple. If the government becomes tyrannical to the point the common man feels the need to throw it off the technology to produce weapons at home exists and is readily available. So all the laws in the world won't be able to stop an armed uprising. That is really the point the author is making. Will it happen here? Depends on how far the government goes in taking our freedoms from us.

Maestro Pistolero
10-13-2011, 8:30 AM
Your points are well made, but ad hominem attacks and name calling adds nothing to them.

The "ad hominem" was directed at the article, not the OP here who linked to it. As others have pointed out, it wasn't a particularly well written article.

Fair enough.

Apec
10-13-2011, 9:43 AM
When can I get my Mark II mars pattern boltgun, fireing 40mm caseless, rocket powered, armor peircing, explosive rounds? (2 points to anyone who knows the reference)

You'll have to make do with a homemade shoota for now.

swilson
10-13-2011, 10:28 AM
The problem with the thinking of all you "the law will just ban xxxxx once they get wind of it" types is this, you are thinking like law abiding sheeple. If the government becomes tyrannical to the point the common man feels the need to throw it off the technology to produce weapons at home exists and is readily available. So all the laws in the world won't be able to stop an armed uprising. That is really the point the author is making. Will it happen here? Depends on how far the government goes in taking our freedoms from us.

That's why I mentioned (alcohol) prohibition, which ended with complete disrespect for the law and enforcement unable to stop the entire nation from breaking it.

Technology or not, even complete bans and confiscation would never collect every single gun... if anything there would be more hidden away than confiscated. An armed uprising has always been possible. Now with computers and CNC machines it just makes it easier to produce them.

glockman19
10-13-2011, 10:31 AM
i have a client, high end machine shop, that provides Stereolythography. ANYTHING that can be rendered in 3D can be reproduced by the machine.

So...

With a Stereo Lythography machine and CNC mill you can reproduce ANY firearm or firearm component.

First...The machines cost a lot of money...My client produces turbines for military jets out of exotic metals.

Second...The "prototype", sample you create is made by laser from a liquid photopolymer...The parts would then need to be milled from a solid piece of metal or a mold(s) would need to be created for MIM parts...some firearms owners prefer milled to molded parts.

So while it can be done by the average joe with access to the machinery, unless you are gearing up for production, it is unlikely to happen.

Stereolythography, is/was created for Rapid Prototyping...It is an excellent took to create and test parts before a production run but functionality of the Rapid prototype is limited...

As an example of Government required color printers and to be software protected so they could not copy currency.

At one time you could bleach a $1 and print a $100 with NO problems until the mint added security threads and holographic images.

Finally, If any machine shop were to begin producing firearms or parts to create complete firearms, they would likely be raided by the ATF and friends.

I personally would prototype fully auto sears and trigger groups for ALL firearms I could.

Question...?...is posession of a fully auto sear and trigger group legal if it is NOT installed?


If we can present this in a 8 second soundbite or create a edited 30 second to 1 minute video showing the manufacture of such a gun from scratch, then we can show the "public" how a "black market" in guns would work.

Now, the Black Market in guns would follow the same pattern as the Black Market in Drugs. The product with the highest profit potential would be the one that would dominate the market.

So, the Black Market gun of choice probably would be a Mac 11, Sten guns and/or a Tec 9. Simple design and all already have so called street creed.

While I don't see things homemade Glocks due to their polymer frames, I do see standard guns like 1911's.

Of course here are some features the "black market" guns would have.

1. No serial numbers or better yet, markings and serial numbers of guns that already are in circulation. Would kinda of screw up registration laws if say you have 100 guns floating around with the same markings and numbers:43:

2. Smooth bore barrels. While accuracy would suffer a bit, it is kind of hard to do ballistic markings when there are none.

3. Selective fire.

4. High capacity magazines.

5. Suppressor adaptable.

The cost in raw materials would be under 50 dollars, the street price for a "super cold" select fire machine pistol

Nicki

grammaton76
10-13-2011, 11:19 AM
While I don't see things homemade Glocks due to their polymer frames, I do see standard guns like 1911's.

Reprap machines would actually have an easier time machining polymer guns than they would metal ones. If you don't care about the gun being re-usable, it would be dirt simple to make a black powder derringer out of pipe for a barrel, a nail for a firing pin, and all plastic parts otherwise. Basically a "reprap Liberator pistol".

I don't agree with homebuilds being an end to gun control, with lawmakers throwing their hands up in the air in defeat as you laugh hysterically while milling an 80% lower.

Fully agreed. The title of "End of gun control" is misleading - this is more of a "now everyone could make a gun" thing.

The problem with the thinking of all you "the law will just ban xxxxx once they get wind of it" types is this, you are thinking like law abiding sheeple. If the government becomes tyrannical to the point the common man feels the need to throw it off the technology to produce weapons at home exists and is readily available. So all the laws in the world won't be able to stop an armed uprising. That is really the point the author is making. Will it happen here? Depends on how far the government goes in taking our freedoms from us.

Sure, armed uprisings are one matter.

But ending the gun control laws? Well, drill presses have been around since forever, and folks could drill third holes in ARs and AKs the whole time. Has that ended the NFA?

IllTemperedCur
10-14-2011, 2:45 PM
Y'all should hunt down the "Colonial Gunsmith" video from Colonial Williamsburg (it's available on bittorrent). Pretty cool to watch a skilled gunsmith build a muzzle-loading rifle out of a brick of pig iron using a hammer/anvil, common hand tools and some hand-made specialty tools. Including a rifling machine made out of wood......seriously.

Tarn_Helm
10-14-2011, 3:31 PM
One day I will be able to construct my own UAV attack drone from an etch-a-sketch and a kite.

You'll see... :TFH:

Obviously, you have not visited the "Want to Sell" area of this site recently.


I already have.

:D

Scott Connors
10-14-2011, 4:25 PM
Nerds often forget the government has absolute power. They can (and will) regulate any technological paradigm shift into uselessness if corporations tell them to.

See also the DMCA, ACTA etc. etc. etc.

Note I said corporations.

Read Charles Stross' excellent sf novel Rule 34 for an account of a police unit that deals with this issue, among others.

curtisfong
10-14-2011, 4:29 PM
Read Charles Stross' excellent sf novel Rule 34 for an account of a police unit that deals with this issue, among others.

HEH. I'm a big Stross fan.

Just added it to my list.

thanks!