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problemchild
10-10-2011, 10:20 PM
I have a 14lb pork shoulder I am going to smoke for 18hrs and then fork shred. I will follow the recipe used by this woman to can up the pork in wide mouth pint jars. I will post back a review with pictures when done.

Concerns? Ideas? Suggestions?

http://momskitchencooking.blogspot.com/2007/09/homecanned-barbeque-pork.html

socal-shooter
10-10-2011, 10:21 PM
i'll take it

pm sent ;)

Scout2Diesel
10-11-2011, 12:26 AM
Mmmm
can't wait!

ExAcHog
10-11-2011, 5:04 AM
Looks like a great recipe...My only (slight) concern is that 18 hours seems like it might empart too much smoke flavor. I usually smoke most roasts for about 8 to 10 hours and they have "IMO" the perfect amount of smokey flavor.
I look forward to hearing how this turms out!

Full Clip
10-11-2011, 5:12 AM
Looks like a great recipe...My only (slight) concern is that 18 hours seems like it might empart too much smoke flavor. I usually smoke most roasts for about 8 to 10 hours and they have "IMO" the perfect amount of smokey flavor.

I've never used a smoker, so is his 14 lb. shoulder bigger that the roasts you've done, hence the 18 hours?

problemchild
10-11-2011, 6:48 AM
Looks like a great recipe...My only (slight) concern is that 18 hours seems like it might empart too much smoke flavor. I usually smoke most roasts for about 8 to 10 hours and they have "IMO" the perfect amount of smokey flavor.
I look forward to hearing how this turms out!

I have an electric smoker and the wood burns up in the first hour. Its just heat from that point on. I might add a second batch of wood at the 2-3 hour mark. Last time I smoked a 12lb roast it tasted fine with only one batch of wood. Just a slight taste of smoke.

What temp do you smoke at?

puropuro
10-11-2011, 7:51 AM
I'd also recommend adding a pinch of cure since you're going to can it (I don't remember if it's sodium nitrate or nitrite....it's the one that lasts longer and breaks down into the other. Or just find some Tenderquick). It will help against botulism, which you are dealing with when you can something (anaerobic environment).

My bbq website:
www.randyq.com

ZenDaddy
10-11-2011, 8:43 AM
:drool5:I have an electric smoker and the wood burns up in the first hour. Its just heat from that point on. I might add a second batch of wood at the 2-3 hour mark. Last time I smoked a 12lb roast it tasted fine with only one batch of wood. Just a slight taste of smoke.

What temp do you smoke at?

Are you asking in general or are you asking exachog specifically?
Personally if I am going to have a "long smoke" where I'm cooking a big piece of meat for many hours I keep it just a degree or two below the boiling point of water at sea level, or 212 degrees. Your approach to the smoke is perfect. What wood do you burn for your pork? I am an apple fan when it comes to pig.

My only concern with canning barbecue pork is that the long cooking times give the meat such a soft texture to begin with, I would be afraid that the canning process and subsequent time on the shelf would deliver a very mushy end product. I like my barbecue to have at least a little resistance to the teeth.

I think you might end up with something that you could spread on toast with a butter knife. Not that that is necessarily a bad thing, just not my thing when it comes to barbecue.

If I were canning barbecue pork, I would probably run a "short smoke" at a higher temp, closer to a roasting process in smoke, and then let the canning process finish bringing the texture down to fork shreddable.

Just thoughts. Good luck with your smoke!


Edit:

Another thought; instead of using nitrites for botulism control, how about a nice Carolina vinegar bbq sauce! Vinegar is a great preservative and frankly, pulled pork would be sorry stuff without a nice Carolina sauce! :drool5:

Eljay
10-11-2011, 1:02 PM
I've smoked pork shoulders as long as 17 hours and they're not too smokey (13-14 is more typical, just happened to have a big one once and that's how long it took). I just use a fairly neutral charcoal and add as many wood chunks as I want scattered throughout the charcoal. Occasionally one gets set on fire and it all works out in the end.

ZenDaddy
10-11-2011, 1:36 PM
Oversmoked is, like everything in barbecue, a subjective term. I think the meat becomes overpowered and starts to taste like burnt rubber if left in smoke too long. I prefer a very light smoke for about a third of the cooking time and then when my friends start to show up and I am almost ready to serve, I throw some more wood on just for effect. At that point it is all for show though, smoke and mirrors so to speak :)

ExAcHog
10-11-2011, 3:01 PM
:drool5:


My only concern with canning barbecue pork is that the long cooking times give the meat such a soft texture to begin with, I would be afraid that the canning process and subsequent time on the shelf would deliver a very mushy end product. I like my barbecue to have at least a little resistance to the teeth.

I think you might end up with something that you could spread on toast with a butter knife. Not that that is necessarily a bad thing, just not my thing when it comes to barbecue.

If I were canning barbecue pork, I would probably run a "short smoke" at a higher temp, closer to a roasting process in smoke, and then let the canning process finish bringing the texture down to fork shreddable.

Just thoughts. Good luck with your smoke!


Edit:

Another thought; instead of using nitrites for botulism control, how about a nice Carolina vinegar bbq sauce! Vinegar is a great preservative and frankly, pulled pork would be sorry stuff without a nice Carolina sauce! :drool5:

Good point...I'm now curious to find out how it holds up AFTER a year or two..As for me, I smoke at about 205 to 215 typically.

problemchild
10-11-2011, 5:53 PM
Well its in the canner now. If I have any jars that burp I will eat them as a tester.

Viagrow
10-12-2011, 9:51 AM
Is this meat intended for long term storage? My concern would be the meat possibly going rancid. I saw a video once of guy who canned fresh meat and pressure cooked it, the meat was edible almost 16 months out. The trick is to remove as much air in the container as possible. The removal of air was accomplished by adding a fat free broth to the top of the mason jar displacing the air. Maybe I'm off topic as I thought the goal was preservation.

problemchild
10-12-2011, 3:26 PM
Is this meat intended for long term storage? My concern would be the meat possibly going rancid. I saw a video once of guy who canned fresh meat and pressure cooked it, the meat was edible almost 16 months out. The trick is to remove as much air in the container as possible. The removal of air was accomplished by adding a fat free broth to the top of the mason jar displacing the air. Maybe I'm off topic as I thought the goal was preservation.

The canning process creates a vacuum in the jar.

problemchild
10-12-2011, 3:29 PM
Finished!

14lbs of meat turned into 12 wide mouth pint jars. I ended up just roasting the pork in a large pan to capture the juice for the jars. I was also worried about creating mush like someone else mentioned. I roasted for 6 hours at 220f and cut it up and hot packed the jars with boiling juice and salt.

I had one jar burp so I will test that jar in a few days to see how the meat is. All jars sealed though. Funny thing was the jar burped when the pressure was dropped at the end of the canning process.

http://www.michaelkdickson.com/webjunk/LMT/HVfood_canned/canned%20pork%20004.jpg

Viagrow
10-12-2011, 3:50 PM
That looks mighty tasty. Pretty much looks like what I saw in the video. That meat should last a good while.

ZenDaddy
10-13-2011, 7:10 AM
PC, that looks like luxury in a bottle. If shtf, Id wipe my *** with pine needle for a week to have a jar.

GlockBlocker
10-13-2011, 7:35 AM
My bbq website:
www.randyq.com
Hey Puropuro, great site! There's a offset in my future. You ever compete?

puropuro
10-13-2011, 7:55 AM
Hey Puropuro, great site! There's a offset in my future. You ever compete?

Thanks!
Don't wanna jack the thread, so I'll do a quick reply and we can take it to PM or another thread.

I know many of the well-known players, and I'm good enough to compete....but no, never quite got there. I did get realllllllly close though :)

Back to the OP, looks good!
Seriously consider a pinch of cure in each jar though. It's very cheap insurance against deadly and painful food poisoning.

Hamilton
10-13-2011, 9:38 AM
It's great that your giving canning a try!

The USDA has home canning information, including information about minimum cook times for meat, poultry, fruit and vegetables. I'll let you research the details if you're going to process another batch of BBQ.

The canning temperature recommended by the momskitchencooking website sound right, 500ml jars cook for 75 minutes at 10lbs pressure (Start the count when you reach the recommended pressure).

I worked in the canning industry for 20 years, as labor, and then as QC and production management. The standard is that the coolest place within the can, or jar must reach X temperature (say 220 Degrees F.) for X minutes. The proper cook time and temperatures are determined after extensively researching what works and what fails. In developing the tables for different products a dial thermometer, a stainless steel probe with a small round thermometer at the top, is pushed into the center of a large chunk of product as soon as the can is removed from the cooker. Samples are also extensively tested for harmful bugs by injecting samples with the bugs and seeing what it takes to kill the organisms. This is done many, even hundreds of times during before recommended times are established. The samples used in determining optimum cook times cover a the full range of variables possible, size of container, fill weight, type and viscosity of the fill liquid, size of the particles product chunks, the pH and salt content, and so on.

If you use a reliable source for determining you cook times and temperatures you won't need to add cure as another poster suggested. Though, I commend the suggestion for its sense of using caution.

Meat and most vegetables are low acid products and a spoiled container doesn't necessarily swell up, or even loose vacuum. Improperly canned meat can make you very ill even when canned with high levels of salt, sugar, vinegar, like BBQ sauce, or any other "preservative."

It's all about cook time and cook temperature. Find a reliable source of information and stick to the recommendations. BTW meat canning goes back to the early half of the nineteenth century, and just about every variation has been researched which is why the USDA or the NFPA (National Food Processors Association - Formerly the National Canners Association) standards are your best bet for reliable information.

problemchild
10-13-2011, 12:47 PM
I can at 15lbs for 75 minutes so I am way over the time/temp needed.


It's great that your giving canning a try!

The USDA has home canning information, including information about minimum cook times for meat, poultry, fruit and vegetables. I'll let you research the details if you're going to process another batch of BBQ.

The canning temperature recommended by the momskitchencooking website sound right, 500ml jars cook for 75 minutes at 10lbs pressure (Start the count when you reach the recommended pressure).

I worked in the canning industry for 20 years, as labor, and then as QC and production management. The standard is that the coolest place within the can, or jar must reach X temperature (say 220 Degrees F.) for X minutes. The proper cook time and temperatures are determined after extensively researching what works and what fails. In developing the tables for different products a dial thermometer, a stainless steel probe with a small round thermometer at the top, is pushed into the center of a large chunk of product as soon as the can is removed from the cooker. Samples are also extensively tested for harmful bugs by injecting samples with the bugs and seeing what it takes to kill the organisms. This is done many, even hundreds of times during before recommended times are established. The samples used in determining optimum cook times cover a the full range of variables possible, size of container, fill weight, type and viscosity of the fill liquid, size of the particles product chunks, the pH and salt content, and so on.

If you use a reliable source for determining you cook times and temperatures you won't need to add cure as another poster suggested. Though, I commend the suggestion for its sense of using caution.

Meat and most vegetables are low acid products and a spoiled container doesn't necessarily swell up, or even loose vacuum. Improperly canned meat can make you very ill even when canned with high levels of salt, sugar, vinegar, like BBQ sauce, or any other "preservative."

It's all about cook time and cook temperature. Find a reliable source of information and stick to the recommendations. BTW meat canning goes back to the early half of the nineteenth century, and just about every variation has been researched which is why the USDA or the NFPA (National Food Processors Association - Formerly the National Canners Association) standards are your best bet for reliable information.

bubbapug1
10-13-2011, 1:13 PM
220 F may be fine for high acid products, but low acid needs more temperature than that or botulism spores could still be intact, which really could ruin the whole survival aspect of canning your own meat.

thomashoward
10-13-2011, 1:25 PM
Is this meat intended for long term storage? My concern would be the meat possibly going rancid. I saw a video once of guy who canned fresh meat and pressure cooked it, the meat was edible almost 16 months out. The trick is to remove as much air in the container as possible. The removal of air was accomplished by adding a fat free broth to the top of the mason jar displacing the air. Maybe I'm off topic as I thought the goal was preservation.

My wife and I make homemade Mincemeat with deer meat like the old days. We have some jars 8 years old that still make great pie

problemchild
10-13-2011, 4:27 PM
Well I popped one of the lids off and cooked it for dinner. More than enough food for my wife and I. We put the pork on some rice and chowed down. Realy really good. I am very happy how it turned out. The texture is perfect and not to soft or hard. This would make a quick meal when/if shtf.

http://www.michaelkdickson.com/webjunk/LMT/HVfood_canned/canned%20pork%20001.jpg

http://www.michaelkdickson.com/webjunk/LMT/HVfood_canned/canned%20pork%20005.jpg

http://www.michaelkdickson.com/webjunk/LMT/HVfood_canned/canned%20pork%20008.jpg

Viagrow
10-14-2011, 10:25 AM
Over rice, damn that looks good. I can almost smell it just by looking at the picture...

Viagrow
10-14-2011, 10:29 AM
My wife and I make homemade Mincemeat with deer meat like the old days. We have some jars 8 years old that still make great pie


8 years out is remarkable. I can now justify this whole canning process to my wife. One look at problemchild's pulled pork over rice and my wife will be sold on canning.

problemchild
10-14-2011, 1:25 PM
8 years out is remarkable. I can now justify this whole canning process to my wife. One look at problemchild's pulled pork over rice and my wife will be sold on canning.

Better than eating some freeze dried squirrel and potatoes huh?