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gunsmith
10-09-2011, 5:33 PM
This thread
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?p=7284564#post7284564

Got me thinking, in the early 2000's I had a friend with a daughter in High School, I looked in her history text about the 2A, all it said was a sentence or two about how it pertains to arming the national guard & does not pertain to individuals ( and whole chapters on the other nine amendments )

I no longer have access to high school text books, can you folks who do look and see what they are teaching our young folks? Please send a detailed report to this thread - including the publisher & date the book was published.

My plan is to start pressuring text book publishers ( who for the most part are extremist liberals in NYC ) to tell the truth about the 2A and stop lying to students and teachers alike.

Unless we address this the next generation will continue to be taught this unbearable rubbish.

BKinzey
10-09-2011, 5:46 PM
The State of Texas has the largest influence on what goes in school books. Your time will be better used if you find out who that committee is and contact them. The publishers themselves do not really control the content of the books. The state organizations which purchase the books do. Last I read the number of books the State of Texas purchases gives them the biggest influence.

duggan
10-09-2011, 6:04 PM
Well I wouldn't count on it showing up in any factual detail here in Cali any time soon. They will have to drop all the unimportant stuff like the 2A and what it really means, to make room for the chapters on The Toni awards or whatever they're gonna put in for gay history.

Paul S
10-09-2011, 6:26 PM
The problems with history texts for high school goes a lot deeper than the incorrect info on the 2nd amendment. Many text books slant the coverage of WW II to make it appear the U.S. was utterly barbaric in using the atom bombs to bring about Japan's surrender. Additionally, the number of casualties as a result are greatly inflated. It never occurs to the liberal history profs. who write these texts that had Japan not attacked the U.S. they probably never would have had to pay the price of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
And don't even get me started on the Law Enforcement / Corrections texts. :(

gunsmith
10-09-2011, 6:54 PM
OK, Texas then.

It was somewhat understandable that in 2003 that text books reflected the liberal collective rights theory but now scotus has made it clear - the 2A is the right of the people

Chosen_1
10-09-2011, 7:01 PM
I took US History last year and we did a whole 2 week unit on the 2A (although it was only found on the Constitution in the reference section of the book). My teacher is kind of a hippie so my buddies and I thought, "this would be interesting" but it turned out he supports RKBA, as long as your not a stupid person.

Probably a few people on this forum who wouldn't be able to buy a gun in his hypothetical country :eek:.

Teacher Sp Ed
10-09-2011, 7:04 PM
I will get a US History Book from my high school tomorrow. The book is compliant with the Curriculum Standards as adopted by the State of California. I will also look at the Common Core Standards which CA along with 48 other States have signed on to.

Technically these Common Core Standards will supersede state standards. For the past 10 years I have participated in text book review and selection in my District and am very familiar with the process of text book selection and the frequency.

7x57
10-09-2011, 7:08 PM
The problems with history texts for high school goes a lot deeper than the incorrect info on the 2nd amendment. Many text books slant the coverage of WW II to make it appear the U.S. was utterly barbaric in using the atom bombs to bring about Japan's surrender. Additionally, the number of casualties as a result are greatly inflated.


I suspect they probably suppress the Rape of Nanking, too. Do they?

7x57

Stonewalker
10-09-2011, 7:16 PM
I suspect they probably suppress the Rape of Nanking, too. Do they?

7x57

Or the fact that the Japanese killed 20 million Chinese civilians before and during WWII??? Nah.... doesn't belong in textbooks.

huntercf
10-09-2011, 8:06 PM
I just looked in my son's history book (8th grade) The 2A has 2 paragraphs dedicated to it, just like the other amendments. Its says "The Second Amendment deals with state militias and the right to bear arms." It does go on to say that the National Guard has replaced militias and states both sides: supporters & opponents of gun control and the debate continues today.

paul0660
10-09-2011, 8:25 PM
Check out unit 731 sometime. The Japanese......good losers, bad winners.

misterjake
10-09-2011, 8:50 PM
This thread
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?p=7284564#post7284564

Got me thinking, in the early 2000's I had a friend with a daughter in High School, I looked in her history text about the 2A, all it said was a sentence or two about how it pertains to arming the national guard & does not pertain to individuals ( and whole chapters on the other nine amendments )

I no longer have access to high school text books, can you folks who do look and see what they are teaching our young folks? Please send a detailed report to this thread - including the publisher & date the book was published.

My plan is to start pressuring text book publishers ( who for the most part are extremist liberals in NYC ) to tell the truth about the 2A and stop lying to students and teachers alike.

Unless we address this the next generation will continue to be taught this unbearable rubbish.

In my Government class we use "We The People" in regards to the 2nd Amendment from my memory it basically states that according to some people is a collective right and others a individual right. It basically paints both pictures however this was published before Heller and McDonald. I'm sure the newer edition will clarify it. :)

It's actually a pretty decent book, sparks up debate amongst students on various points of view.

wchutt
10-09-2011, 10:04 PM
In my Government class we use "We The People" in regards to the 2nd Amendment from my memory it basically states that according to some people is a collective right and others a individual right. It basically paints both pictures however this was published before Heller and McDonald. I'm sure the newer edition will clarify it. :)

It's actually a pretty decent book, sparks up debate amongst students on various points of view.
I, too, use We the People in my class. We also look at how the Bill of Rights applies to the federal government using Heller as an example, how rights have been incorporated using McDonald as an example. We further look at the purpose of the 14th Amendment and what Privileges and Immunities are, specifically the rights of US citizens to travel and to keep and bear arms. Finally, we look at the Slaughter House cases as an example of judicial activism that goes against the explicit meaning of the Constitution, and why incorporation came into practice.
The Cato Institute has an excellent short (10 minute) video by a guy named Alan Gura that does a good job explaining the P and I clause that your class may enjoy. :gura:

http://www.cato.org/multimedia/cato-video/alan-gura-discusses-privileges-or-immunities-constitution-day

gunsmith
10-09-2011, 10:09 PM
I just looked in my son's history book (8th grade) The 2A has 2 paragraphs dedicated to it, just like the other amendments. Its says "The Second Amendment deals with state militias and the right to bear arms." It does go on to say that the National Guard has replaced militias and states both sides: supporters & opponents of gun control and the debate continues today.

When was it published? before Heller or after? Who is the publisher if after.

ubet
10-10-2011, 2:27 AM
In my Government class we use "We The People" in regards to the 2nd Amendment from my memory it basically states that according to some people is a collective right and others a individual right. It basically paints both pictures however this was published before Heller and McDonald. I'm sure the newer edition will clarify it. :)

It's actually a pretty decent book, sparks up debate amongst students on various points of view.

I graduated high school in 2000, we had we the people then, yeah I would say it was a little pre heller mcdonald.

berg
10-10-2011, 9:27 AM
Current high school history textbooks: http://www.historytextbooks.org/adopted.htm

Search for topics within books: http://books.google.com/bkshp?hl=en&tab=pp

http://www.amazon.com/New-Used-Textbooks-Books/b/ref=sa_menu_tb8?ie=UTF8&node=465600

KWA-S
10-10-2011, 1:00 PM
I honestly don't expect textbooks to be too biased. Maintaining a centrist view helps them sell to wider audiences.

The question is, do the teachers cover it? My memories of US history, teachers covered mostly the Puritan and early settlements period, and focused a lot less on what happened during REAL US history. A little bit on the revolution, a lot more on the few wars that happened between then and the civil war, and a whole lot telling us about the oppression of blacks in southern states, both before and after the war. Not a single class ever talked about post 1900s history, and none really went too deep into the constitution and mostly glossed over the bill of rights.

Course, even if they did, are kids really inclined to learn this stuff? My experience is that they generally don't care, so long as they get an A. Also, the material might be a little too difficult conceptually for high schoolers to understand. Heck, most folks after high school STILL haven't learned that other people have rights that we must respect. Finally, I believe an appreciation for rights stems from the flexing thereof, instead of learned from books.

I did a bit of reading on my own on the weekends, textbooks had some really interesting stuff we never cover. WWII happening to be my personal favorite, funny that video games taught me more about it when I was a kid.

Lugiahua
10-10-2011, 1:26 PM
My history teacher back in high school was a hardcore NRA member, he actually used to live next to their HQ in VA.
He spent whole class explaining 2-A in the class, and talked about the weapon collection he had.

NorCalRedneck
10-10-2011, 2:32 PM
I just asked my 8yo brother (3rd grade) if he has learned about the Constitution yet. I wanted to see if they taught about the 2nd amendment. He said "What's the Constitution? We've been learning how to write cursive".

I would think third graders have learned at least a little about the Constitution, but I guess learning to write cursive, which 99.9% of the population will never use again, is more important.:facepalm:

oni.dori
10-11-2011, 2:21 AM
The State of Texas has the largest influence on what goes in school books. Your time will be better used if you find out who that committee is and contact them. The publishers themselves do not really control the content of the books. The state organizations which purchase the books do. Last I read the number of books the State of Texas purchases gives them the biggest influence.

Actually, New York does, since they spend more than anyone on educational and "teaching teachers" material than any other state, followed closely by California and Florida.
My credentials you ask? I worked for one of the biggest names in educational publishing for about 3 years before I got tired of the corporate BS.

Teacher Sp Ed
10-11-2011, 3:02 PM
This East Bay Area School District uses United States History, Modern America, Prentice Hall California Edition for regular US history and The American Promise, A History of The United States publisher Bedford St. Martin, for Honors classes.

The only reference to the 2A is in the Prentice Hall book on page 18 under paragraph called Bill of Rights, "the protected rights included freedom of speech, free exercise of religion, freedom of the press and assembly, the right to bear arms as part of "a well-regulated Militia" quotes theirs.

gunsandrockets
10-11-2011, 7:47 PM
I just asked my 8yo brother (3rd grade) if he has learned about the Constitution yet. I wanted to see if they taught about the 2nd amendment. He said "What's the Constitution? We've been learning how to write cursive".

I would think third graders have learned at least a little about the Constitution, but I guess learning to write cursive, which 99.9% of the population will never use again, is more important.:facepalm:


As I recall my school covered the U.S. Constitution during 7th grade social studies class. Ask your brother again in four years.